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The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes Volume 1-2…
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The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes Volume 1-2

by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Leslie S. Klinger (Editor)

Other authors: Patricia J. Chui (Contributor), John le Carré (Introduction), Sidney Paget (Illustrator)

Series: New Annotated Sherlock Holmes (omnibus 1, 2)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
7631118,458 (4.56)20
Recently added byJamesJoist, private library, wdripp, fairy.bookmother, spoonmoonhollow, ralphmullenax
  1. 10
    The Casebook of Solar Pons by August Derleth (uncultured)
    uncultured: This series, written by Holmes afficianado August Derleth, is bar none the absolute closest thing to resurrecting Arthur Conan Doyle and setting him to work. At first it seems like a cheap parody--Holmes' brother Mycroft has become Bancroft, Dr. Watson is now Dr. Parker, etc...but once that frightened governess pops through the door you'll see just how well Mr. Derleth has done in weaving. Pons even has his own fan club. The stories take place in the 1920's, but aside from using automobiles are essentially the same foggy gaslit things that made Watson & Co. so endearing. Derleth wrote six books of stories and has been succeeded by the very capable Basil Copper. My personal favorite is The Casebook of Solar Pons, with a haunted library, a deadly archers' club, forged books, and more...… (more)
  2. 01
    Regarding Sherlock Holmes: The Adventures of Solar Pons by August Derleth (Michael.Rimmer)
    Michael.Rimmer: Holmesian pastiches written by August Derleth after Doyle said he would write no more stories about the Master Detective.
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English (11)  Swedish (1)  All languages (12)
Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
not a good place to start
( )
  Kaethe | Oct 17, 2016 |
I guess I’m reviewing the footnotes here. The original Holmes stories get 5 stars from me. This edition is a mixed bag. If you’ve never read the Sherlock Holmes stories I would strongly recommend that you NOT start here. Go get one of the cheap collections from Barnes and Noble instead.

First, the good; There are a lot of footnotes, and many of them are very interesting and useful. The original stories contain a lot of slang and contemporary references to turn-of -the-century England that I didn’t understand when I first read them.

The bad; A good portion of the notes made me crazy after a while. They are obviously written for a certain type of fan, and I’m not it. The notes are all written in the style of treating everything as if it were real and Watson were the author. I’ve read books were this was amusing, in this case it was confusing and annoying. There was also no attempt to differentiate in the notes between scholarly notes, pastiches, or other works. I wasn’t sure how to take much of the information I was reading.

1. What I loved about the stories was the world they created, fully formed. A good portion of the notes are spent trying to match what sometimes seemed like every minor character, shop, and chair mentioned to the real world. I found this pretty ridiculous. Doyle mentions real places and people often. When he he names a fictional church I can see mentioning that it doesn’t really exist, but paragraphs of people debating which church is the “real” one (even though none of them actually fit the description) are pretty pointless. There is a LOT of this. And constant referencing events in the stories and how they don’t line up to our history or the publishing dates of the Doyle stories. “Watson mentions many other stories, but this was only the second one published!” I started to wonder if the writers understood the concept of fiction.

This seems in stark opposition to;

2. Making up all kinds of crazy back stories. Seemingly every person and event had notes with someone’s conjecture as to what could have “really” happened. “Holmes stopped to buy a newspaper, perhaps the paperboy was really Oscar WIlde in disguise, teaming with Dr. Moriarty to hide the identity of Jack the Ripper, who was really Mycroft.” Nothing was more annoying than this. It seemed like a third of the notes were of this type. I’m not exaggerating much in the ridiculousness of the theories, only my description was much shorter and less convoluted. Everyone with a similar last name had a back story about how they were secretly related, yet when there were police officers named Jones in two different stories that seemed to have different mannerisms, it seemed to baffle writers how this could be, or how there could be two people named Jones on the London police force. Nearly every story had a “Holmes/Mycroft/Watson was actually the killer” theory. I nearly threw the book a few times.

Maybe I wasn’t getting it, but there were several points where I thought the writers must have been morons. I suspect it was the way the notes were presented seemingly without context. There would be debates about something that seemed perfectly clear to me. And many instances of passages reading something like “Holmes walked across the street to get an Egg McMuffin” would be followed by various theories about why he walked across the street, ending with “perhaps he wanted an Egg McMuffin”.

The problem is there are as much notes as original text. I was constantly looking to the notes and then finding a large portion of them to be pointless and annoying. But an equally large number are very interesting, and you never know which one you’re getting. Much of it just worked to suck all the fun and charm out of the stories for me. I’m hesitant to read the other volumes now.
( )
1 vote bongo_x | Apr 6, 2013 |
Currently enjoying rereading this series with much discussion over at http://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/521299-sherlock-holmes ( )
  Murphy-Jacobs | Mar 30, 2013 |
The "New Annotated Sherlock Holmes" first volume contains all of the short stories originally published in "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes" and "The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes." These stories comprise the initial run of Holmes' tales, ending with the climactic "The Final Problem," in which Holmes confronts Professor Moriarty. Holmes' tales work best in short story format, and this collection is an absolute delight.

I'm not a particular fan of detection fiction, nor of mystery novels. Reading these Holmes' stories illustrated to me why that is - Doyle sets the script for detective fiction which everyone else follows, but nobody has topped. It is similar, in some respects, to the influence of Tolkien on the fantasy genre. While Tolkien breathed commercial life into it, his influence was so great that it stifled the creativity of future fantasy authors. The same could be said of Doyle's Sherlock Holmes. The influence is very clearly seen on recent television. Modern mystery shows (ranging from the excellent to the abhorrent) like Psych, House, the Mentalist and CSI all draw on the Holmes' formula to varying degrees. This is all to say, that whether you have an interest in the genre before picking up this volume or not, I think there is a good chance you will be as enthralled as I was.

Most of the stories follow a fairly standard formula. Holmes' partner and friend, Dr. Watson, recalls a case in which Holmes displayed his particular acuity at reasoning to solve some crime. A desperate and befuddled victim describe some bizarre scenario, and Watson and Holmes look into it. To everyone's astonishment, Holmes' solves the case, recounting in the end how he managed to pick up clues missed by his compatriots and reason to the actual events. There are deviations in many of the stories, but the general framework quickly becomes rather comfortable for the reader. Watson is an affable and enjoyable narrator. Holmes can be cold at times, and Watson's humor is a nice counterpoint. He's also an able contributor to the stories themselves, even if he is not quite up to Holmes' superhuman abilities.

It's Holmes, rather obviously, who is the most interesting character. In some of the stories, he seems to act simply as a reasoning machine. When Watson finds him, he is hard at work on some scientific pursuit, and once the case is on, he relentlessly pursues it to its conclusion. Yet, many of the other stories show a more complicated and interesting character. While justice is on his mind, he also pursues these cases because he is so fundamentally bored. It's not simply boredom with the events of the day, but that he finds life itself a dreary chore when not intellectually stimulated. On one hand, this seems somewhat odd. It has always seemed to me that the deeper one's appreciation for the complexities of the world, the more fascinating (and less boring) the world becomes. Is it that Holmes' is simply not interested in scientific pursuits, or that he is so intelligent that he has passed even this point? I think not. The first is clearly false, given his interest in chemistry, and we are often introduced to the limits of Holmes' abilities. So what is the cause of Holmes' ennui? It hardly seems to be a crisis in faith, or an existential crisis about the absurdity of the world as it is. I rather enjoyed wrestling with this characteristic, particularly since it seems so foreign to Watson, the narrator. Watson is consistently impressed, engaged and interested in the events he reports upon. It makes him unable to really bring himself to bear on Holmes' own personality, which creates ample opportunities for the reader to dive in.

As one would expect with any volume of short stories, the quality can be a bit uneven. Some of the stories are simply fantastic, particularly "The Red Headed League," "The Boscombe Valley Mystery," "The Copper Beeches," "The Naval Treaty" and "The Final Problem" while others don't quite come off. For example, "The Stock Broker's Clerk" is quite similar to another, earlier story, and the "Five Orange Pips" has a setup that does payoff in terms of details about the secret organization or a plausible explanation of their behavior. Also of interest is the rather progressive ending to "The Yellow Face," which deals with interracial marriage. Nevertheless, the level of quality is generally quite high across the entire volume. Doyle is an able stylist, the mysteries are generally interesting, and the tales are frequently exciting reads.

This edition is also worth saying a few words about. It is designed for "Sherlockian" scholars. These fans of the novels operate under the fiction that the novels are literally true, and that Holmes was a real person whose exploits were recorded by the quite real Watson. The annotations in the volume are in this vein, and typically provide substantive background information which can be used by these fans to examine the plausibility of some of the stories and of Holmes' inferences. As someone who is not interested in this approach to the texts, I found the notes to be a bit hit or miss. Some gave considerable background information about the era in which the stories take place, which generally contribute to the text. Others, however, concern the truth of obscure details of the story (such as train schedules) which were of no interest to me. It is quite obvious that Holmes' inferences are often abduction run amok (there are other plausible explanations of the data), but I simply leave that aside as part of a suspension of disbelief. For those reading the stories like me, rather than like the Sherlockian Scholars the volume is aimed at, these notes can be safely skipped over. The volume also contains a large number of excellent illustrations collected from various sources. A few superflous (to this audience) footnotes aside, this is a wonderful edition of these excellent stories. ( )
  jeff.maynes | Mar 7, 2012 |
This will be in the 'currently reading' section forever... I'm three pages into the first story and there have been something like 12 footnotes already! ( )
  BooksForDinner | Oct 3, 2011 |
Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Sir Arthur Conan Doyleprimary authorall editionscalculated
Klinger, Leslie S.Editormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Chui, Patricia J.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
le Carré, JohnIntroductionsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Paget, SidneyIllustratorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed

Contains

The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes: The Short Stories, Volume 1 by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes: The Short Stories, Volume 2 by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

A Scandal in Bohemia [short story] by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Red-Headed League [short story] by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

A Case of Identity [short story] by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Boscombe Valley Mystery [short story] by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

Case of the Five Orange Pips [short story] by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Speckled Band by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Engineer's Thumb (The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, #9) by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Noble Bachelor by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Beryl Coronet by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Copper Beeches [short story] by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Man with the Twisted Lip [short story] by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle

Silver Blaze by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Yellow Face by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Stockbroker's Clerk (The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, #3) by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Gloria Scott by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

Sherlock Holmes - The Musgrave Ritual by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Reigate Squire (The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, #6) by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Cardboard Box [short story] by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Crooked Man (The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, #7) by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Resident Patient (The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, #8) by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Greek Interpreter (The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, #9) by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Naval Treaty by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Final Problem: Another Case for Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

I cinque misteri di Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Musgrave Ritual (indirect)

The Return of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle

The Adventure of the Abbey Grange by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Empty House by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Norwood Builder by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Dancing Men [short story] by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Priory School by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of Black Peter by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Six Napoleons by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Three Students by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Golden Pince-Nez by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Missing Three-Quarter by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Second Stain by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

His Last Bow by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Plans [Short Story] by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Red Circle by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Devil's Foot by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

His Last Bow (single story) by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Dying Detective by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle

The Adventure of the Mazarin Stone by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Problem of Thor Bridge by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Creeping Man by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire [short story] by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Three Garridebs by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Illustrious Client [short story] by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

Sherlock Holmes: The Adventure of Three Gables by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

Sherlock Holmes and the Blanched Soldier by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Lion's Mane by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Retired Colourman by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of the Veiled Lodger by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

The Adventure of Shoscombe Old Place by Arthur Conan Doyle (indirect)

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Individual volumes should not be combined with the complete set or different volumes of the same set. This edition has extensive notes by Leslie S. Klinger and should not be combined with non-annotated editions nor with editions annotated by others.
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Volume 1 contains "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes" and "The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes."

Volume 2 contains "The Return of Sherlock Holmes," "His Last Bow," and "The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes."
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0393059162, Hardcover)

A cause for international celebration—the most important Sherlock Holmes publication in four decades.

This monumental edition promises to be the most important new contribution to Sherlock Holmes literature since William Baring-Gould's 1967 classic work. In this boxed set, Leslie Klinger, a leading world authority, reassembles Arthur Conan Doyle's 56 classic short stories in the order in which they appeared in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century book editions. Inside, readers will find a cornucopia of insights: beginners will benefit from Klinger's insightful biographies of Holmes, Watson, and Conan Doyle; history lovers will revel in the wealth of Victorian literary and cultural details; Sherlockian fanatics will puzzle over tantalizing new theories; art lovers will thrill to the 800-plus illustrations, which make this the most lavishly illustrated edition of the Holmes tales ever produced. The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes illuminates the timeless genius of Arthur Conan Doyle for an entirely new generation of readers. Two-color text throughout; 800+ illustrations

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:20:34 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

Collects Doyle's short stories that star Sherlock Holmes, each of which is annotated to provide literary and cultural details about Victorian society, and also includes biographies of Holmes, Dr. Watson, and the author himself.

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W.W. Norton

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