HomeGroupsTalkExplore
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

No Longer at Ease (1960)

by Chinua Achebe

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: African Trilogy (2)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,3872211,715 (3.71)100
The story of a man whose foreign education has separated him from his African roots and made him parts of a ruling elite whose corruption he finds repugnant. More than thirty years after it was first written, this novel remains a brilliant statement on the challenges still facing African society.
  1. 10
    Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe (Limelite)
    Limelite: The prequel.
  2. 10
    Daniel by Henning Mankell (Limelite)
    Limelite: More exploitative in its exploration of African colonialism and set in the 19th C. Shares tone and literary quality.
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 100 mentions

English (19)  Galician (1)  Spanish (1)  Italian (1)  All languages (22)
Showing 1-5 of 19 (next | show all)
Set in 1950s Nigeria, two generations after his first book, Things Fall Apart. Where the first novel tracked the dismantling of culture and village life after the arrival of English missionaries, the second traces the adaptation to European ways of life and the systemic constraints for all individuals. ( )
  sfj2 | Jun 26, 2022 |
grandson of earlier character convicted of taking bribes after English education earns sr. govt. position
  ritaer | Aug 24, 2021 |
A classic story of moral struggle in an age of turbulent social change and the final book in Chinua Achebe’s The African Trilogy
  riselibrary_CSUC | Jun 6, 2020 |
NO LONGER AT EASE is a beautifully realized tug-of-war with a human being as the rope. Obi Okonkwo returns to Africa after being educated in England thinking that he pretty much knows who he is. The ease with which he defines himself is tested as soon as he gets off the boat and begins his new life. Obi is caught between white and black cultures, European and African mindsets, poverty versus affluence, family versus personal and even how a man deals with women. Author Chinua Achebe does not allow Obi to battle one conflict at a time but instead marvelously shows how there might be multiple issues pulling on either side of the rope at any given time. In the midst of Obi's battles, the novel deftly ribs everyone with a soft touch. Characters cannot help but reveal themselves. As they so often fall back on the clichés of their own cultures and natures, they reveal how limited their understanding of the world around them really is. Obi is blind to some of the things that might make his life easier (for someone facing financial worries, it never occurs to him to dismiss his driver or his houseboy) but the author allows us to see it if we will--nothing is forced at the reader. The world is presented and the reader has to realize what Obi does not on their own. While Achebe's previous book THINGS FALL APART deals with a community and culture being destroyed dramatically by advancing machines spewing black smoke and death, NO LONGER AT EASE shows a slower crumbling destruction without a clue what if anything might rise from the debris. While I liked the previous book better--probably because on a human level it was easier to follow a protagonist who truly knew who he was--I still enjoyed this one though I wish it had more to it. At a light 154 pages, I wished it had a little more heft to it. Would like to have known a little bit more about a lot of other characters and learned more about Obi's culture but it is the rope and what the rope feels like as it gets pulled that is emphasized and not those pulling on the rope. ( )
  KurtWombat | Sep 15, 2019 |
A look at the struggle between African and Western cultures in Nigeria right before Independence as told from an English educated Nigerian's life. ( )
  snash | Jan 27, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 19 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (2 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Chinua Achebeprimary authorall editionscalculated
Onobrakpeya, BruceIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
For three or four weeks Obi Okonkwo had been steeling himself against this moment.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

The story of a man whose foreign education has separated him from his African roots and made him parts of a ruling elite whose corruption he finds repugnant. More than thirty years after it was first written, this novel remains a brilliant statement on the challenges still facing African society.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.71)
0.5
1
1.5 3
2 18
2.5 2
3 44
3.5 15
4 83
4.5 4
5 37

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

Penguin Australia

An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

» Publisher information page

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 182,779,317 books! | Top bar: Always visible