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Map of Ireland: A Novel

by Stephanie Grant

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853258,531 (3.53)None
In 1974, the first year of busing in Boston, Massachusetts, seventeen-year-old Ann Ahern's lesbianism, which has isolated her from other white students, draws her to her African French teacher and leads her to insights into Blacks' struggles in the post-Civil Rights era.
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This book sat on my to-read list for many, many years, but when it came time to read it, I came away rather disappointed. The characters didn't grab me, the writing wasn't strong, and the plot was kind of disjointed. I really would have loved to see a more deeper exploration of Ann's character and the world she was inadvertently thrust into, but I felt like so much was just glossed over. ( )
  majesdane | Jan 8, 2019 |
This is a story set in 1974 South Boston, aka "Southie," when the city began busing children to desegregate the schools. It is told by its protagonist, Ann, a resident of Southie, who is also a lesbian. Stephanie Grant weaves a very believable tale about racism, homosexuality, conflict, and change. For Ann, It begins with a crush on a black French teacher, who's come to the newly desegrated high school. From there her life changes dramatically, and irrevocably. A good read. Just one detail of this story I'd like to correct--when Ann travels to the Cape from Southie, she drives over the Bourne Bridge. Not likely, from Boston; more likely the Sagamore (all the other geographical details are in place, so it's odd this one is wrong). ( )
  fromthecomfychair | Jan 14, 2010 |
Ann Ahern has a crush on her French teacher. It doesn't disturb her that Mademoiselle Eugenie is a woman, but it does disturb her that she's Black. It's 1974, and Boston is still struggling with the Civil Rights movement, instituting busing between neighborhoods to desegregate the schools. Ann's Catholic Irish-American community of Southie protests the busing vehemently, and Ann finds herself caught between her mother's hatred and her love/hate relationship with the new Black girls at school. Ann soon learns that she might need to leave Southie in order to get true perspective, and finds herself having to redefine many of her thoughts and beliefs, her very self and the language that she uses to describe her feelings. This portrait of recent United States history will have leave you thinking about what it takes to become who you really want to be. ( )
  becker | Feb 2, 2009 |
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Mademoiselle Eugénie was the blackest person I'd ever seen.
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In 1974, the first year of busing in Boston, Massachusetts, seventeen-year-old Ann Ahern's lesbianism, which has isolated her from other white students, draws her to her African French teacher and leads her to insights into Blacks' struggles in the post-Civil Rights era.

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