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Kindertransport by Olga Levy Drucker
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Kindertransport (1992)

by Olga Levy Drucker

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197890,333 (3.91)19
  1. 00
    Good Night, Mr. Tom by Michelle Magorian (labfs39)
    labfs39: In both books, a child is sent to the English countryside for safety during WWII, and both deal with the relationships between child and caregiver. In Good night, Mr. Tom, the child is escaping the Blitz bombing in London; whereas in Kindertransport, the child is escaping Nazi Germany.… (more)
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» See also 19 mentions

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Every time Tisha b'Av rolls around, I seek out a meaningful, poignant book I can read while my fellow congregants and I drone on mindlessly with the Kinnot, while also passing their perfunctory inspections to make sure the material is on their nosyface level. This book fit the bill very well, and gave me a good, brief background on the Kindertransport, which is important for me to know about, because my wife's grandfather survived through this means. The book is written with a child's wonder, in the author's old age, which makes sense, because the POV of such traumas usually remain fixed in time, and told as such. Books like these are important, for they take the fuzzy, overwhelming, giant death statistics, and turn them into singular, human stories, which is known as the reason for Anne Frank's diary success. Turns out the author was one of the relatively lucky ones, in a world of abject horror. ( )
  MartinBodek | Oct 21, 2015 |
Every time Tisha b'Av rolls around, I seek out a meaningful, poignant book I can read while my fellow congregants and I drone on mindlessly with the Kinnot, while also passing their perfunctory inspections to make sure the material is on their nosyface level. This book fit the bill very well, and gave me a good, brief background on the Kindertransport, which is important for me to know about, because my wife's grandfather survived through this means. The book is written with a child's wonder, in the author's old age, which makes sense, because the POV of such traumas usually remain fixed in time, and told as such. Books like these are important, for they take the fuzzy, overwhelming, giant death statistics, and turn them into singular, human stories, which is known as the reason for Anne Frank's diary success. Turns out the author was one of the relatively lucky ones, in a world of abject horror. ( )
  MartinBodek | Oct 21, 2015 |
Prior to the beginning of World War II, a heroic effort was made to transport as many Jewish children as possible out of Germany. these efforts rescued over 10,000 Jewish children. Ollie's mother made arrangements for her eleven year old daughter to join the kindertransport and reach safety in England. Unable to speak English, Ollie is shuffled from home to home until at the age of 16 she leaves school to work for a family of seven. This is a touching memoir, which brings Ollie and her existence to life. Although her circumstances weren't perfect, she was able to survive and even thrive in a new country. ( )
  JanaRose1 | Mar 19, 2011 |
A good, but sometimes sad holocaust story. Agood read for girls who enjoy historical realistic fiction ( )
  jebu0203 | Feb 1, 2011 |
Autobiography of 11 y.o. girl sent to England in 1938 alone and reunited with parents 1945.
  Folkshul | Jan 15, 2011 |
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All survivors have a story, and there are as many stories as there are individuals who do the telling. To all those who lived to tell their story, and to all who did not - and to all my German-Jewish ancestors who tried for so many generations to carry on their daily lives in freedom and peace - I dedicate my story.
Purdue Jewish Studies Program
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0805042512, Paperback)

Mama and I climbed aboard. I waved to Papa until he was only a tiny speck in the distance. The train turned the curve, and he was gone.

The powerful autobiographical account of a young girls' struggle as a Jewish refugee in England from 1939-1945.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:00:43 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

The author describes the circumstances in Germany after Hitler came to power that led to the evacuation of many Jewish children to England and her experiences as a young girl in England during World War II.

» see all 2 descriptions

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