HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Ice Limit by Douglas Preston
Loading...

The Ice Limit (2000)

by Douglas Preston, Lincoln Child

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,598247,145 (3.62)31
The largest known meteorite has been discovered, entombed in the earth for millions of years on a frigid, desolate island off the southern tip of Chile. At four thousand tons, this treasure seems impossible to move. New York billionaire Palmer Lloyd is determined to have this incredible find for his new museum. Stocking a cargo ship with the finest scientists and engineers, he builds a flawless expedition. But from the first approach to the meteorite, people begin to die. A frightening truth is about to unfold: The men and women of the Rolvaag are not taking this ancient, enigmatic object anywhere. It is taking them.… (more)
Recently added byfaircruelty, Bink42, fosterfam, private library, LFLWilmot, BMPerrin, EmilyW916, ballphoenix

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 31 mentions

English (20)  Spanish (2)  German (1)  Dutch (1)  All languages (24)
Showing 1-5 of 20 (next | show all)
The largest known meteorite has been discovered, entombed in the earth for millions of years on a frigid, desolate island off the southern tip of Chile. At four thousand tons, this treasure seems impossible to move. New York billionaire Palmer Lloyd is determined to have this incredible find for his new museum. Stocking a cargo ship with the finest scientists and engineers, he builds a flawless expedition. But from the first approach to the meteorite, people begin to die.

I was caught up in this story right from the beginning. It’s an adventure with many difficulties to overcome, and suspense, tension and excitement throughout. The meteorite is the mystery here and there’s a big twist at the end. I liked the main characters and thoroughly enjoyed this story. ( )
  gaylebutz | Sep 7, 2019 |
Lloyd (this is his last name) is a super-rich guy who decides he wants to bring a giant meteorite back to the US to his museum from a small island off the coast of Chile, so he brings together a group of people to do so. Plenty of bumps and bruises along the way (apparently, people died, too!).

Sorry for the poor summary. Was listening to the audio and as soon as it was introduced and I hear the narrator (Scott Brick), I thought “oh no”. He has a very nice voice, but it’s also very monotone and I tend not to pay much attention as he narrates. So, I missed much of what was happening (including anyone dying!). I hated that they referred to pretty much everyone in the book by their last name. Because of this (and my lack of attention), when I was paying attention, I couldn’t even remember who the lone female character was. Oh, look! As I read a summary, apparently there were 2 women characters! Who knew!? If only the authors had referred to them by their first names, I’m sure I, at least, would have caught that! The book was loosely based on a real giant meteorite, apparently. ( )
  LibraryCin | Oct 2, 2017 |
I just plain flat out enjoy the writing of Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child, whether it be a Pendergast novel or a standalone thriller. When I'm in need of high-quality distraction, I know where to go. Well, I was in need, and The Ice Limit filled the bill.

The authors really gave me a feel for the weather and seas around Cape Horn-- and made me wonder how on earth those earliest of explorers ever made it through sailing their tiny wooden ships. I also found the logistics of transporting the huge meteorite fascinating, from digging it out of the ground to getting it aboard the oil tanker to beginning the journey home. Of course, there's a nasty villain threatening their very existence during the last half of the book, but his behavior is almost secondary to the weird goings-on surrounding the meteorite.

Thrillers aren't usually known for their characterization, but there were two characters in this book to whom I reacted. The most interesting was McFarlane, the meteorite hunter because his character did grow and change. I had a less favorable reaction to Glinn, the man in charge of the operation. I became very tired of him never explaining what he was doing. Yes, he was brilliant at his job, but when a magician pulls an endless number of rabbits out of his hat, he becomes boring.

On the whole, this book moves swiftly, and the story is engrossing. It also ends on a doozy of a cliffhanger. For those who can't stand unresolved issues, Beyond the Ice Limit became available this year. I think I'm going to have to find out what's going on with that meteorite! ( )
  cathyskye | Nov 23, 2016 |
I read this book years ago and, other than recalling I liked it, remembered little to nothing about it. Except the last few words. And they were a stunner.

I decided to read it again because Preston and Child recently published the a sequel: Beyond the Ice Limit.

The story tells of a very wealthy man who wishes to create a museum like none other. He hears of a strange discovery off the coast of Chile and learns it's the largest meteorite even found. He enlists the help of Eli Glenn and his company, Effective Engineering Solutions (EES), to unearth the meteorite, get it onto a converted oil tanker, and bring it back to New York where the new museum is located. What follows is an amazing story of triumph, failure, and adventure. I've waited a LONG time to see what happens. In a few moments, I'll begin finding out... ( )
  Jarratt | Jun 29, 2016 |
In reading some of the other reviews of this book, it seems that there's little "gray" in the feelings people have about it.

They either find it great fun and adventure or useless tripe. I choose to align with the first group!

"The Ice Limit" is a novel set along the lines of what fans of Preston and Child have come to expect...good characterization, great gadgets, and "off-the-wall" plots. They certainly cover all three bases in this book! The 400 pages in this novel seem to fly by due to solid writing and some rather short chapters.
When the world's 7th richest man decides that he wants to add to his eclectic collection of world's "greatest and biggest", the reader is set forth on an adventure of grand proportions. What he seeks is a red meteorite weighing in at 250,000 tons. Money becomes no object in this billionaire's quest, so he hires the best experts and scientists and biggest ship that money can buy. Greed is the motivating factor for most of these people, except for archi-geologist Sam McFarlane who wants to study the meteorite for science's sake and Ship Captain Sally Britton, both of whom are seeking to put troubled pasts behind them.

Weather and the Chilean Navy play big roles in the success and/or failure of this venture. Without giving away too much of the plot, let me suffice to say that there are twists and turns every few pages with an ending that certainly leaves the door open for the sequel published some 15 years later.

For those of you who like the novels of Cussler, Crichton, James Rollins, Robert Darnton, or a good "Indiana Jones-type yarn", you won't go wrong with "The Ice Limit". While perhaps not as good as the authors' eariler hits, "Relic" and "Reliquary", this book stands on it's own merits and would make a great motion picture. ( )
  coachtim30 | Jun 20, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 20 (next | show all)
From this popular team comes another solid thriller.

Billionaire Palmer Lloyd's hobby is buying up rare artifacts; the current object of his desire is the world's largest meteorite, buried on an island off the coast of Chile. Eli Glinn is the head of the high-tech engineering firm Palmer hires to figure out a way to bring the meteorite home to the U.S. Sam McFarlane is the down-and-out meteorite hunter, the expert whose own theory about the origins of the meteorite, if proven to be true, could spell disaster for everyone involved.

It is no accident that this fits the description of a big-budget feature film. After all, Preston and Child have a history of writing novels that read like movies in prose form, with exciting stories, plenty of interesting characters (here we also have a boat captain who's a recovering alcoholic), and visually arresting set pieces.

Most of the novel's action takes place either on Rolvaag, a huge tanker rebuilt to carry the enormous meteorite, or on Isla Desolacion, where Palmer's group tries to uncover, and move, the meteorite without losing too many lives in the process; both locations are perfect for the big screen. The characterizations here are rather deeper than those found in most of the team's previous thrillers--the players are more like people and less like stick figures--but, as always, the action is what keeps readers turning the pages.

The authors' fans will appreciate their new novel, as will fans of such writers as Michael Crichton and Clive Cussler.
 

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Preston, Douglasprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Child, Lincolnmain authorall editionsconfirmed
Accornero, FrancoCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Information from the Italian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
Lincoln Child dedicates this book to his daughter, Veronica
Douglas Preston dedicates this book to Walter Winings Nelson, artist, photographer, and partner in adventure.
First words
The valley that had no name ran between barren hills, a long mottled floor of gray and green covered with soldier moss, lichens, and carpha grasses.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Published in German as Ice Ship
Publisher's editors
Information from the Italian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Blurbers
Publisher series
Information from the Italian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.62)
0.5 1
1 6
1.5 2
2 24
2.5 7
3 125
3.5 28
4 132
4.5 10
5 65

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 138,923,856 books! | Top bar: Always visible