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Whose justice? Which rationality? (1988)

by Alasdair MacIntyre

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520444,995 (4.04)7
Is there any cause or war worth risking one's life for? How can we determine which actions are vices and which virtues? MacIntyre, professor of philosophy at Vanderbilt University, unravels these and other such questions by linking the concept of justice to what he calls practical rationality. He rejects the grab-what-you-can, utilitarian yardstick adopted by moral relativists. Instead, he argues that four wholly different, incompatible ideas of justice put forth by Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas and Hume have helped shape our modern individualistic world. In his unorthodox view, each person seeks the good through an ongoing dialogue with one of these traditions or within Jewish, non-Western or other historical traditions. This weighty sequel to After Virtue (1981) is certain to stir debate.… (more)
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Showing 3 of 3
Whose Justice? Which Rationality?, the sequel to After Virtue, is a persuasive argument of there not being rationality that is not the rationality of some tradition. MacIntyre examines the problems presented by the existence of rival traditions of inquiry in the cases of four major philosophers: Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, and Hume. ( )
  jerrikobly | May 17, 2013 |
A history of Western ideas about rationality and justice. So, "WHOSE ideas about justice are we contemplating (and forcibly pushing out for others to them to deal with, or else!)?" ( )
  vegetarian | Dec 21, 2012 |
When we talk about "Justice" or "reason" we assume that people know what we mean. This is not always true, of course, because we have differing concepts of justice and rationality, which MacIntyre skillfully lays out in this book. This is not so much a sequel to After Virtue as much as it is a Prequel.

MacIntyre has a very easy to read style, which is helpful, because the concepts he tackles are very complicated. ( )
  Arctic-Stranger | Nov 23, 2007 |
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Is there any cause or war worth risking one's life for? How can we determine which actions are vices and which virtues? MacIntyre, professor of philosophy at Vanderbilt University, unravels these and other such questions by linking the concept of justice to what he calls practical rationality. He rejects the grab-what-you-can, utilitarian yardstick adopted by moral relativists. Instead, he argues that four wholly different, incompatible ideas of justice put forth by Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas and Hume have helped shape our modern individualistic world. In his unorthodox view, each person seeks the good through an ongoing dialogue with one of these traditions or within Jewish, non-Western or other historical traditions. This weighty sequel to After Virtue (1981) is certain to stir debate.

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