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Migraine by Oliver Sacks
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Migraine (1985)

by Oliver Sacks

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Showing 4 of 4
Published in 1971, revised in 1991, in 2014 this technical in-depth treatment of the state of knowledge on migraines is terribly out of date. Perhaps it would be interesting as history of medicine or in a "Look what they thought in 1971!" kind of way.
  WildMaggie | Feb 1, 2014 |
This is Sacks' first book, and it shows. He still has to find his style.

There are two problems with this book. The first one is a profusion of medical terminology (brachycardia, ptosis, myoclonus...). This is also a problem in Awakenings (his next book), but Awakenings doesn't suffer from the second problem: case histories instead of persons. In Awakenings and all later books, the person always shines through the case history. His other books are about how persons deal with (medical) afflictions, this book is about the migraine itself in the first place, and the persons who have the migraine are almost inconsequential.

Only read this if you are very interested in migraine, or extremely interested in Oliver Sacks. ( )
  wester | May 9, 2012 |
If you are looking for a book that defines migraine in an almost textbook like manner, citing case studies, historical data, and the like, this very comprehensive tome does that and more. This is an extremely thorough covering of migraine in all of its forms, severity and duration.

Published in 1970 with revisions in 1985 and 1992, due to the updates in medications and other techniques in recent years (I'm thinking particularly of a heart surgery that has been utilized and also botox), it is definitely time for another update to be more complete.

Despite this, I found it to be extremely helpful personally as someone who has suffered from migraines for over 25 years to see not only the type of migraines I was experiencing, but also why I had such difficulty pinpointing the cause. ( )
  KinnicChick | Sep 1, 2010 |
Showing 4 of 4
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» Add other authors (7 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Sacks, Oliverprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Gooddy, WilliamForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Siegel, Ralph M.Contributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Socrates, in Plato, would prescribe no Physick for Charmides' headache till first he had eased his troublesome mind; body and soul must be cured together, as head and eyes...
—Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy
Whoever...sees in illness a vital expression of the organism, will no longer see it as an enemy. In the moment that I realise that the disease is a creation of the patient, it becomes for me the same sort of thing as his manner of walking, his mode of speech, his facial expression, the movements of his hands, the drawings he has made, the house he has built, the business he settled, or the way his thoughts go: a significant symbol of the powers that rule him, and that I try to influence when I deem it right.
—George Groddeck
Dedication
In memory of my parents
First words
Our first problem arises from the word migraine, which implies the existence of a (hemicranial) headache as a defining characteristic.
Quotations
Freud reminds us that "...the ego is first and foremost a a body-ego...the mental projection of the surface of the body." The sense of "self" appears to be based, fundamentally, on a continuous inference from the stability of body-image, the stability of outward perceptions, and the stability of time -perception. Feelings of ego-dissolution readily and promptly occur if there is serious disorder or instability of body-image, external perception, or time-perception, and all of these, as we have seen, may occur during the course of a migraine aura.
Among the strangest and most intense symptoms of migraine aura, and the most difficult of description or analysis, are the occurrence of feelings of sudden familiarity or certitude (déjà vu), or its opposite, feelings of sudden strangeness and unfamiliarity (jamais vu). Such states are experience, momentarily and occasionally, by everyone; their occurrence in migraine auras (as in epileptic auras, psychoses, etc.) is marked by their overwhelming intensity and relatively long duration. These states are sometimes associated with a multitude of other feelings: the thought that time has stopped, or is mysteriously recapitulating itself; the feeling that one is dreaming, or momentarily transported to another world; feelings of intense nostalgia, in déjà vu, sometimes associated with an uprush of long-forgotten memories; feelings of clairvoyance, in déjà vu; or of the world or oneself being newly-minted, in jamais vu; and in all cases, the feeling that consciousness has been doubled.
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Book description
Geschreven door cc n van de grote klinische auteurs van tic twintigste eeuw, moet Migraine gelezen worden om zowel de briljante inzichten in het functioneren van de hersenen als om de manier waarop migraine besproken
Deze nieuwe editie van Oliver Sacks1 bekende standaardwerk Migraine - waarin hij op opmerkelijke wijze inzicht biedt in beleving, diagnose en therapie - is aanzienlijk uitgebreid en verrijkt met aanvullende case histories, nieuwe onderzoeksgegevens en praktische informatie over de behandeling van migraine. In een nieuw hoofdstuk, dat een kleur katern bevat met afbeeldingen van schilderijen die gemaakt zijn dooi' migrainepatiënten, bespreekt Oliver Sacks de overeenkomsten tussen visuele hallucinaties - of aura's - die vaak aan een migraine voorafgaan en de hallucinaties die voorkomen bij het gebruik van bepaalde medicijnen of bij een delirium. Oliver Sacks beschrijft de thallucinatorische constanten' tussen deze verschillende visuele hallucinaties en hij verklaart wat dit onthult over de werking van onze hersenen. Nog een belangrijke toevoeging aan de eerdere editie is het overzicht van de recente ontwikkelingen in de behandeling van migraine, waaronder zowel de vele nieuwe medicijnen die de afgelopen twintig jaar zijn ontwikkeld als de alternatieve behandelingen worden genoemd. Alleen Oliver Sacks, met zijn grenzeloze nieuwsgierigheid en rijke verbeelding, kan zo'n alomvattend boek over een van de oudste bezoekingen van de mensheid schrijven.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 037570406X, Paperback)

The many manifestations of migraine can vary dramatically from one patient to another, even within the same patient at different times. Among the most compelling and perplexing of these symptoms are the strange visual hallucinations and distortions of space, time, and body image which migraineurs sometimes experience. Portrayals of these uncanny states have found their way into many works of art, from the heavenly visions of Hildegard von Bingen to Alice in Wonderland. Dr. Oliver Sacks argues that migraine cannot be understood simply as an illness, but must be viewed as a complex condition with a unique role to play in each individual's life.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:15:55 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

The many manifestations of migraine can vary dramatically from one patient to another, even within the same patient at different times. Among the most compelling and perplexing of these symptoms are the strange visual hallucinations and distortions of space, time, and body image which migraineurs sometimes experience. Portrayals of these uncanny states have found their way into many works of art, from the heavenly visions of Hildegard von Bingen to Alice in Wonderland. Renowned neurologist Dr. Oliver Sacks argues that migraine cannot be understood simply as an illness, but must be viewed as a complex condition with a unique role to play in each individual's life.--From publisher description.… (more)

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