HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth by…
Loading...

How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth (1982)

by Gordon D. Fee, Douglas K. Stuart

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4,018251,914 (3.96)23
Your Guide to Understanding the BibleUnderstanding the Bible isn't for the few, the gifted, the scholarly. The Bible is accessible. It's meant to be read and comprehended by everyone from armchair readers to seminary students. A few essential insights into the Bible can clear up a lot of misconceptions and help you grasp the meaning of Scripture and its application to your 21st-century life. More than half a million people have turned to How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth to inform their reading of the Bible. This third edition features substantial revisions that keep pace with current scholarship, resources, and culture. Changes include:*Updated language*A new authors' preface*Several chapters rewritten for better readability*Updated list of recommended commentaries and resourcesCovering everything from translational concerns to different genres of biblical writing, How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth is used all around the world. In clear, simple language, it helps you accurately understand the different parts of the Bible--their meaning for ancient audiences and their implications for you today--so you can uncover the inexhaustible worth that is in God's Word.… (more)
  1. 10
    Holy Bible - Evangelical Heritage Version (EHV) by Inc. Wartburg Project (divinepeacelutheran)
    divinepeacelutheran: My go-to version of the Bible. No additions or deletions. Easy to read.
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 23 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 24 (next | show all)
The Bible contains portions written in different genres of literature. This book explores the nuances of these various genres and the immense implications they have on proper interpretation of texts. This is an invaluable study for anyone who is serious about understanding what the biblical authors were trying to say.
  HCC_ResourceLibrary | Jan 12, 2019 |
An introduction at a very pracctical level of the skills Bible users can and should use to uncover the teachings the Bible has to offer to contemporary readers. ( )
  FriendshipFLibrary | Feb 23, 2018 |
Understanding the Bible isn’t for the few, the gifted, the scholarly. The Bible is accessible. It’s meant to be read and comprehended by everyone from armchair readers to seminary students. A few essential insights into the Bible can clear up a lot of misconceptions and help you grasp the meaning of Scripture and its application to your twenty-first-century life.

More than three quarters of a million people have turned to How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth to inform their reading of the Bible. This fourth edition features revisions that keep pace with current scholarship, resources, and culture. Changes include:

Updated language for better readability
Scripture references now appear only in brackets at the end of a sentence or paragraph, helping you read the Bible as you would read any book—without the numbers
A new authors’ preface
Redesigned and updated diagrams
Updated list of recommended commentaries and resources

Covering everything from translational concerns to different genres of biblical writing, How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth is used all around the world. In clear, simple language, it helps you accurately understand the different parts of the Bible—their meaning for ancient audiences and their implications for you today—so you can uncover the inexhaustible worth that is in God’s Word.
  OCMCCP | Jan 9, 2018 |
How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth is a work that speaks to the method by which one interprets the Holy Scriptures. Gordon D. Fee and Douglas Stuart have produced this work to address the interpretative method by discussing what is typically understood to be the dynamic interface between exegesis and hermeneutics. In the understanding of the authors exegesis is the “careful, systematic study of the Scripture to discover the original, intended meaning” (27), and hermeneutics, which does point to the whole field of interpretation, is used in the narrower sense “of seeking the contemporary relevance of ancient texts” (33). Therefore, the purpose of the authors is to give the reader the tools to not only understand the context and original setting in which the Scriptures were produced, but to also to take that understanding and make them applicable to the modern reader.

The body of the work is comprised of discussions that point to the methods and tools by which an individual may understand the original historical context and apply that understanding to the lives of contemporary Christians. Each discussion is held within the framework of a specific genre of writing; i.e., epistle, narrative, history, divine bibliography, parables, or wisdom. The point that is begin made by Fee and Stuart by using this general outline is to highlight the fact that when we understand the type of literature, or style of writing, used by the authors when relating the thoughts of God, we have a head start on a better understanding of what is being related. There are specific considerations that should be considered when looking at a style of writing that help when understanding the basic message being relayed. The style and shape of a personal letter has a different thrust than prophetic literature; narrative is to be understood in a more literal fashion than the parables – even though parables are a form of narrative. Consideration of genre helps with the initial exegesis as described by the authors. Further, within each specific genre are considerations that relate to those categories. For instance – the use of parallelism in Hebrew poetry, or the use of figurative language when reading and understanding the parables.

One appreciates that the authors lay out their understanding of the words exegesis and hermeneutics, but one should also be aware that where Fee and Stuart place the exegetical process necessarily before the hermeneutical process while other authors in the past have appeared to reverse that order so that hermeneutics takes on the role of understanding what the Scriptures tell us and exegesis is the process by which contemporary understanding is achieved and meaning is drawn from the text. Also, even though understanding the basic genres used by the Biblical writers has become a foundational consideration in interpretation, the genres covered can overlap at many points in the Biblical record. There are prophetic portions in the divine bibliography, just as there are parables built into the Old Testament narrative – a point that Fee and Stuart do recognize.
Overall, How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth would be a fine addition to the library of both amateur and professional biblical scholars. Well written and easy to read, the work provides a worthwhile reference for interpretative considerations.

Some quotes from the work:

“Let it be said at the outset – and repeated throughout – that the aim of good interpretation is not uniqueness, one is not trying to discover what no one else has ever seen before” (21).

“The basic rule: a text cannot mean what it never could have meant to the author or readers” (34). This rule, of course, does not always help one to find out what a given passage means, but it does help to set limits as to what it cannot mean” (77).

“If one wishes to use a Biblical precedent to justify some present action, one is on safer ground if the principle of the action is taught elsewhere, where it is the primary intent so to teach” (130).

“Because many of Jesus’ imperative are set in the context of expounding the Old Testament law and because to many people they seem to present an impossible ideal, a variety of hermeneutical ploys have been offered to ‘get around’ them as normative authority for the church” (149).

“To read any of the psalms well, you need to appreciate symbolic language (metaphor and simile) for what it is intended to evoke and then to ‘translate’ it into the reality it is pointing to” (216).

“Furthermore, we can still hear as God’s word – indeed, must hear – that discipleship goes the way of the cross, that God has not promised us freedom from suffering and death but triumph through it. … Thus Revelation is God’s word of comfort and encouragement to Christians who suffer, especially believers who suffer at the hand of the state, precisely because they are Christians” (271). ( )
  SDCrawford | Dec 20, 2016 |
Good overview of the topic of interpreting Scripture. They lay out the fundamentals well in pretty accessible language. ( )
1 vote HGButchWalker | Sep 21, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 24 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (3 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Gordon D. Feeprimary authorall editionscalculated
Stuart, Douglas K.main authorall editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
For our parents
Donald and Grace Fee
and
Streeter and Merle Stuart
from whom we learned
our love for the Word

First words
In our lighter moments we toyed with the idea of calling this book Not Just Another Book on How to Understand the Bible.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.96)
0.5
1 3
1.5 1
2 9
2.5 1
3 61
3.5 12
4 96
4.5 7
5 84

Zondervan

An edition of this book was published by Zondervan.

» Publisher information page

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 138,200,083 books! | Top bar: Always visible