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Guantanamo Boy by Anna Perera
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Guantanamo Boy

by Anna Perera

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Showing 1-5 of 15 (next | show all)
Khalid is a 15-year-old British boy of Asian descent. Born and raised in Rochester, computer-mad Khalid is unhappy that his parents are taking him to Pakistan for a family funeral. But like them he little suspects that making such a trip in early 2002 will have dangerous consequences. Kidnapped, held for several months and tortured in several of the notorious 'secret' CIA prisons, Khalid is eventually transported to Guantanamo Bay. There, along with the other orange-suited inmates, he is subjected to further interrogations, indignities and the mind-numbing routine of a life without meaningful human contact or affection. Losing his faith in humanity and nearly losing his mind altogether, Khalid is eventually given access to a lawyer, thanks to the efforts of his family and friends back home. More than two years after he was first kidnapped, Khalid is released and allowed to go home.
A really compelling novel. A little slow in a couple of scenes when Khalid is gradually loosing his mind in prison, but otherwise excellent. Ends on a positive note when Khalid returns to his old high school and talks about his experiences. The message is one of tolerance and acceptance of all people, no matter what they look like. ( )
  dalzan | Apr 22, 2013 |
A chilling and harrowing story of a young victim of a profound injustice brought about by paranoia, prejudice, and an appalling disregard for human rights. This novel left me angry and disgusted. It should be widely read and discussed. ( )
  Sullywriter | Apr 3, 2013 |
This was simpy a fantastic read. I read it cover to cover in one sitting.

This book is so far out of what I normally read. I don't read a lot of these 'issues' books written for teens. I feel they are usually over-done to say the least. This story is not in the same league as anything like those. This book is about an English-born Pakistani boy who leads the life of most normal English boys. He very rarely has seen the hate that is directed at Muslims or Pakistanis until he visits his own homeland, Pakistan.

Together with his parents he travels to Pakistan, where he is caught up in events which are really beyond his control and before he knows it he has been kidnapped by US forces believing him to be a terrorist and he eventually finds himself in Guantanamo Bay.

This is a harrowing tale, which had me completely engrossed in this young man's life. The emotions and trauma displayed by this young man have been portrayed so realisticly, I felt like I was experiencing them with him. I don't want to go into detail as it would be more than spoilers, they would ruin the storyline for people who want to read it.

I NEVER thought I would read anything like this, but it was so highly recommended by book reviewers here in NZ, I just had to find out what they thought was so wonderful.

This is NOT a tale of American bashing or pro-muslim (which I thought it would be at first). It is a true-to-life story(the authors' note says it is "inspired by real events".) that has certainly got me looking at things in a new way. This story is scary and wonderful, harrowing and moving and a book that I recommend to everyone.

I am a 44 year-old, white christian woman and yet I was moved to tears and to a stronger understanding of those people in this world who, though they might believe differently than me, want and desire the same things I do. A must read for everyone over the age of 14 no matter their race, creed, colour or religion. ( )
  HunebeeNZ2 | Apr 1, 2013 |
This was simpy a fantastic read. I read it cover to cover in one sitting.

This book is so far out of what I normally read. I don't read a lot of these 'issues' books written for teens. I feel they are usually over-done to say the least. This story is not in the same league as anything like those. This book is about an English-born Pakistani boy who leads the life of most normal English boys. He very rarely has seen the hate that is directed at Muslims or Pakistanis until he visits his own homeland, Pakistan.

Together with his parents he travels to Pakistan, where he is caught up in events which are really beyond his control and before he knows it he has been kidnapped by US forces believing him to be a terrorist and he eventually finds himself in Guantanamo Bay.

This is a harrowing tale, which had me completely engrossed in this young man's life. The emotions and trauma displayed by this young man have been portrayed so realisticly, I felt like I was experiencing them with him. I don't want to go into detail as it would be more than spoilers, they would ruin the storyline for people who want to read it.

I NEVER thought I would read anything like this, but it was so highly recommended by book reviewers here in NZ, I just had to find out what they thought was so wonderful.

This is NOT a tale of American bashing or pro-muslim (which I thought it would be at first). It is a true-to-life story(the authors' note says it is "inspired by real events".) that has certainly got me looking at things in a new way. This story is scary and wonderful, harrowing and moving and a book that I recommend to everyone.

I am a 44 year-old, white christian woman and yet I was moved to tears and to a stronger understanding of those people in this world who, though they might believe differently than me, want and desire the same things I do. A must read for everyone over the age of 14 no matter their race, creed, colour or religion. ( )
  HunebeeNZ2 | Mar 30, 2013 |
This was simpy a fantastic read. I read it cover to cover in one sitting.

This book is so far out of what I normally read. I don't read a lot of these 'issues' books written for teens. I feel they are usually over-done to say the least. This story is not in the same league as anything like those. This book is about an English-born Pakistani boy who leads the life of most normal English boys. He very rarely has seen the hate that is directed at Muslims or Pakistanis until he visits his own homeland, Pakistan.

Together with his parents he travels to Pakistan, where he is caught up in events which are really beyond his control and before he knows it he has been kidnapped by US forces believing him to be a terrorist and he eventually finds himself in Guantanamo Bay.

This is a harrowing tale, which had me completely engrossed in this young man's life. The emotions and trauma displayed by this young man have been portrayed so realisticly, I felt like I was experiencing them with him. I don't want to go into detail as it would be more than spoilers, they would ruin the storyline for people who want to read it.

I NEVER thought I would read anything like this, but it was so highly recommended by book reviewers here in NZ, I just had to find out what they thought was so wonderful.

This is NOT a tale of American bashing or pro-muslim (which I thought it would be at first). It is a true-to-life story(the authors' note says it is "inspired by real events".) that has certainly got me looking at things in a new way. This story is scary and wonderful, harrowing and moving and a book that I recommend to everyone.

I am a 44 year-old, white christian woman and yet I was moved to tears and to a stronger understanding of those people in this world who, though they might believe differently than me, want and desire the same things I do. A must read for everyone over the age of 14 no matter their race, creed, colour or religion. ( )
  HunebeeNZ2 | Mar 30, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 15 (next | show all)
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Khalid, a 15-year-old Muslim boy from Rochdale, is abducted from Pakistan while on holiday with his family. He is taken to Guantanamo Bay and held without charge, where his hopes and dreams are crushed under the cruellest of circumstances.

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