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As Eve Said To the Serpent by Rebecca Solnit

As Eve Said To the Serpent (2001)

by Rebecca Solnit

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Solnit is one of the most interesting American essayists of the moment - more explosive, more playful, more erudite and more alive than the dull McSweeny's crew. Here she shows how the absences and presences in landscape art reveal and conceal interrelated cultural rules about gender and the environment. ( )
1 vote deliriumslibrarian | Apr 22, 2006 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0820324930, Paperback)

To Rebecca Solnit, the word "landscape" implies not only literal places, but also the ground on which we invent our lives and confront our innermost troubles and desires. The organic world, to Solnit, gives rise to the social, political, and philosophical landscapes we inhabit. As Eve Said to the Serpent skillfully weaves the natural world with the realm of art--its history, techniques, and criticism--to offer a remarkable compendium of Solnit's research and ruminations.

The nineteen pieces in this book range from the intellectual formality of traditional art criticism to highly personal, lyrical meditations. All are distinguished by Solnit's vivid, original style that blends imaginative associations with penetrating insights. These thoughts produce quirky, intelligent, and wryly humorous content as Solnit ranges across disciplines to explore nuclear test sites, the meaning of national borders, deserts, clouds, and caves--as well as ideas of the feminine and the sublime as they relate to our physical and psychological terrains.

Sixty images throughout the book display the work of the contemporary artists under discussion, including landscape photographers, performance artists, sculptors, and installation artists. Alongside her text, Solnit's gallery of images provides a vivid excursion into new ways of perceiving landscape, bodies, and art. Animals and the human body appear together with space and terra firma as Solnit reconfigures the blurred lines that define nature.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:12:03 -0400)

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