HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Noah's Compass by Anne Tyler
Loading...

Noah's Compass (2009)

by Anne Tyler

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,409827,774 (3.34)82

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 82 mentions

English (78)  Finnish (2)  Spanish (1)  Italian (1)  All languages (82)
Showing 1-5 of 78 (next | show all)
Not Tyler's best book, but still a pleasant read. Nothing surprising in it--pretty much exactly what I expected when I opened the book. ( )
  GaylaBassham | May 27, 2018 |
Anne Tyler is one of my favorite authors. Her novels are always well-written and once again, she takes ordinary people and places them in ordinary situations, many of which (both the people and the situations) are not exciting or interesting. But that's what life is like!!

Liam, a 61-year-old philosopher, has been downsized out of his job as a 5th-grade teacher, a job he settled for instead of philosophy. He's divorced, lives alone, and moves to a cheaper apartment. Ms. Tyler takes us through his experiences and how he deals with them. Some of his days are just plain boring and, while this is not a fast-paced novel, it moved quickly for me. I enjoyed some of the characters, mainly an ex-wife and a teen daughter. Liam's affair with Eunice was touching, up to a point!! The ending was unsatisfactory for me but I realize that life doesn't always turn out the way I want it to. ( )
  pegmcdaniel | Jul 10, 2017 |
set anywhere, older man (61), robbery loses memory of it, finds Eunice can remember — then he realizes he wasn't there when he was

Liam Pennywell, who set out to be a philosopher and ended up teaching fifth grade, never much liked the job at that run-down private school, so early retirement doesn't bother him. But he is troubled by his inability to remember anything about the first night that he moved into his new, spare, and efficient condominium on the outskirts of Baltimore. All he knows when he wakes up the next day in the hospital is that his head is sore and bandaged.
  christinejoseph | Jul 5, 2017 |
I enjoy Anne Tyler's novels. They always seem to deal with the lessons we learn through the rather mundane events of which our lives are assembled.

At the end of Noah's Compass, I felt conflicted between wanting secrets revealed and wanting a happily-ever-after for Liam and wanting those things to remain elusive, as they so often are in real life. I find the presence of that conflict satisfying. I am glad Tyler didn't stoop to cheap drama.

This novel is well suited for audiobook format. ( )
1 vote ImperfectCJ | Jun 20, 2017 |
Not Tyler's best book, but still a pleasant read. Nothing surprising in it--pretty much exactly what I expected when I opened the book. ( )
  gayla.bassham | Nov 7, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 78 (next | show all)
Liam’s story is animated by all the homey little details of ordinary life that make Ms. Tyler’s narratives feel so intimate and recognizable, as if we were flipping through an album of snapshots belonging to a relative or neighbor. But his story also turns out to be slighter than Ms. Tyler’s best work, tipping over into the sentimentality she is prone to and eschewing the ambition of her last novel, “Digging to America.” Whereas that book opened out into a commodious meditation on identity and belonging — what it means to be part of a family, a culture, a country — this one devolves into a predictable and highly contrived tale of one man’s late midlife crisis.
 
Liam’s disengagement is a symptom of depression. And while novels are populated by the luckless and lovelorn, depressed people are not very funny, even when they do funny things.
 
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
In the sixty-first year of his life, Liam Pennywell lost his job.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Rakastettu tarinankertoja kuvaa koskettavasti ja tarkkanäköisesti rakkauden voimaa ja anteeksiantoa. Hiljainen ja muiden tahtoon alistuva Liam joutuu ennenaikaiselle eläkkeelle luokanopettajan virastaan. Huonontuneen rahatilanteen pakottamana hän muuttaa pienempään asuntoon, mutta joutuu heti ensimmäisenä yönä murtovarkaan mukiloimaksi. Aivotärähdyksen saanut Liam ei muista yön tapahtumista mitään. Hän saa kuitenkin avuntarjouksen neurologin vastaanotolla tapaamaltaan nuorelta naiselta. Eunice antaa yllättävän sytykkeen Liamin hiipuneeseen elämään. Samalla Liam joutuu pohtimaan suhdettaan menneisyydessä tekemiinsä valintoihin.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0307272400, Hardcover)

From the incomparable Anne Tyler, a wise, gently humorous, and deeply compassionate novel about a schoolteacher, who has been forced to retire at sixty-one, coming to terms with the final phase of his life.

Liam Pennywell, who set out to be a philosopher and ended up teaching fifth grade, never much liked the job at that run-down private school, so early retirement doesn’t bother him. But he is troubled by his inability to remember anything about the first night that he moved into his new, spare, and efficient condominium on the outskirts of Baltimore. All he knows when he wakes up the next day in the hospital is that his head is sore and bandaged.

His effort to recover the moments of his life that have been stolen from him leads him on an unexpected detour. What he needs is someone who can do the remembering for him. What he gets is—well, something quite different.

We all know a Liam. In fact, there may be a little of Liam in each of us. Which is why Anne Tyler’s lovely novel resonates so deeply.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:10:31 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

From the incomparable Anne Tyler, a wise, gently humorous, and deeply compassionate novel about a schoolteacher, who has been forced to retire at sixty-one, coming to terms with the final phase of his life.

» see all 9 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.34)
0.5 1
1 9
1.5 3
2 47
2.5 18
3 130
3.5 53
4 126
4.5 9
5 31

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 127,959,233 books! | Top bar: Always visible