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Roman Diary: The Journal of Iliona of Mytilini Who Was Captured and Sold…

by Richard Platt

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235499,954 (4.5)1
When Iliona's ship is boarded by pirates, she ends up in Rome as a slave. Separated from her brother, Apollo, Iliona is soon at the whim of her owners, and the chance of regaining freedom seems like a distant dream. Iliona's life as a slave isn't as bad as she feared: her new family provides clothing, food, and even schooling, and best of all, she is free to explore the wonders of Rome.… (more)
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The wellresearched ctional diary of a Greek girl traveling to Egypt and sold into slavery when pirates attack her ship.
  NCSS | Jul 23, 2021 |
I thoroughly enjoyed reading The Journal of Iliona, a historical fiction book that follows the life of a young girl separated her brother and sold into slavery in Ancient Rome. Although her situation is tragic, Iliona's outlook on life is inspiring to the readers. The book discusses the state of affairs in Rome at this time, the innovations that are arising and ultimately the freedom that Iliona achieves. At the end of the book, their is an excerpt with more information about the ancient world as well as a glossary and index that contribute to the story. ( )
  MargaretStrahan | Sep 25, 2018 |
Although this is a picture book, it is not appropriate for very young readers. The illustrations are brutal and the context may be considered a bit dark, however this is an excellent resource to direct older students to that are interested in ancient history. The illustrations are beautiful and the perspective is unique. ( )
  kblackmar1 | Sep 11, 2016 |
By telling the tale through a slave girl who is about the same age as the targeted reader, Richard Platt forces his readers to explore the Ancient Roman way of life for members of all socio-economic classes. I especially appreciated how Platt delivers information all the while maintaining the main character’s identity and sustaining the storyline. This is evident when the main character writes, “they cleaned our hair with fine-toothed combs to remove the lice and gave us new garments to wear. I could not help but enjoy this, until one of my companions snapped, “Idiot! Can’t you see that they are preparing us for sale again?”” As Platt explains that the Ancient Romans pampered their slaves before they were auctioned off, he also builds a sense of reality and connection with the character by adding personality and the naiveté of the pre-teen main character. Platt repeatedly mixes facts with the main character’s personal tale, which is also evident when her mistress explains that their household occasionally does not receive water from the aqueducts because the pipes run for more than 60,000 paces, and therefore are prone to leak. I also enjoyed the illustrations; they supported the text and served as groundwork for imagining Rome circa AD 107. I think this book is very effective in what it aims to do. I would definitely recommend it. ( )
2 vote Amy_Ko | Sep 30, 2015 |
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When Iliona's ship is boarded by pirates, she ends up in Rome as a slave. Separated from her brother, Apollo, Iliona is soon at the whim of her owners, and the chance of regaining freedom seems like a distant dream. Iliona's life as a slave isn't as bad as she feared: her new family provides clothing, food, and even schooling, and best of all, she is free to explore the wonders of Rome.

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Candlewick Press

An edition of this book was published by Candlewick Press.

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