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Red Storm Rising by Tom Clancy
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Red Storm Rising

by Tom Clancy, Larry Bond

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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5,485491,260 (3.94)80
When Moslem fundamentalists destroy a key Soviet oil complex, the Russians initiate a plan of diplomatic trickery for their seizure of Persian Gulf oil.
Recently added byrena75, libraryganesh, egwedpyreu, Raef66, navygirl29, private library
  1. 52
    Red Army by Ralph Peters (Anonymous user)
    Anonymous user: Published in the same period as "Red Storm Rising", "Red Army" depicts a Warsaw Pact invasion of Western Germany seen entirely from the viewpoint of the Soviet soldiers. A riveting and insightful story written by an US Intelligence officer.
  2. 00
    The Hunt for Red October by Tom Clancy (jpjr)
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» See also 80 mentions

English (48)  Spanish (1)  All languages (49)
Showing 1-5 of 48 (next | show all)
I first read this book in 1988 when the Iron Curtain was firmly in place and thoughts of a war between the USSR and the USA seemed like a possibility. To add interest, I read it while living in Germany and my father had just returned from a deployment in Iceland where he flew a P3 Orion (the planes that hunted the subs in the book). In thought it would be boring... All that war stuff. But Mr Clancy has a way of making technology interesting Anna humanizing both the good guys abs the bad guys. Reading it more than thirty years later I still found it griping, though the technology is woefully outdated. The basis for the crisis seems every bit as likely today as it did thirty years ago. ( )
  tjsjohanna | Nov 20, 2019 |
Re-read after many years, the reason why I enlisted in the Navy and volunteered for submarines. Held up fairly well, still a good read. ( )
  kcshankd | May 25, 2019 |
Far from being Clancy's best work, he gets too bogged down in acronyms & technojargon. This is completely unrelated to any of his Jack Ryan books.

A former CIA analyst I met years ago told me that at the time this was written, Clancy disclosed some classified information in the text just to show that he had high-level sources & could do it . Subsequently, he went into hiding for a while, until things cooled down, and he patched things up with the feds.

The guy who told me the story might have just been a blowhard for all I know. It made for an interesting story though, LOL. In a way, the story seems to fit since this book is so different from Clancy's other books. I'm used to reading acronyms & military jargon in his novels, but it was excessive in this, his second novel. Red October wasn't nearly as bad in that regard, and neither were his subsequent books. ( )
  Adam_Z | Mar 19, 2018 |
A great cold war adventure of a world that "Could have been". The book lists several weapon systems that were planned but never introduced, and ultimately suffers from a lack of detail and action during the actual combat but is overall a hell'va read for those who still wonder what the Cold War going hot would look like. ( )
  Teufle | Sep 24, 2017 |
If you've ever wondered what the cold war of the 1980's period turning into world war 3 would be like, this is the book for you.
The Hunt for Red October was a far easier film to make than this, which is probably why even now this is one Clancy story that has not made it to the movies.
Watch the military technology at the command of NATO and the old USSR collide. ( )
  AdrianGHilder | Feb 22, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 48 (next | show all)
Although the writing is unduly prolix, especially in its loving treatment of submarine warfare, the story is well told. The many readers of Mr. Clancy's first book will enjoy ''Red Storm Rising.'' His is an oddly comforting version of World War III.
 

» Add other authors (11 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Tom Clancyprimary authorall editionscalculated
Bond, Larrymain authorall editionsconfirmed
Abraham, F. MurrayNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bruning, FransTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Isaka, KiyoshiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Prichard, MichaelNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ratzkin, LawrenceCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sabbagh, JeanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Smit, JanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Spinelli, PieroTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Watkins, France-MarieTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
From time immemorial, the purpose of a navy has been to influence, and sometimes decide, issues on land. This was so with the Greeks of antiquity; Romans, who created a navy to defeat Carthage; the Spanish, whose armada tried and failed to conquer England; and, most eminently, in the Atlantic and Pacific during two world wars. The sea has always given man in expensive transport and ease of communication over long distances. It has also provided concealment, because being over the horizon meant being out of sight and effectively beyond reach. The sea has supplied mobility, capability, and support throughout Western history, and those failing in the sea-power test -notably Alexander, Napoleon and Hitler - also failed the longevity one. - Edward L. Beach, in Keepers of the Sea
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They moved swiftly, silently, with purpose, under a crystalline, star-filled night in western Siberia.
Quotations
The Badger pilots were a little too relaxed, now that the most dangerous part of their mission was behind them. They didn’t spot the four American fighters until they were less than a mile away, their robin’s-egg-blue paint blending them in perfectly with the clear morning sky. Buns selected her cannon for the first pass and triggered two hundred rounds into the cockpit of a Badger. The twin –engine bomber went instantly out of control and rolled over like a dead whale. One. The major howled with delight, pulled the Eagle up into a five-g loop, then over to dive on the next target. The Soviets were alerted now, and the second Badger attempted to dive away. It had not the slightest chance. Nakamura fired her Sidewinder from a range of less than a mile and watched the missile trace all the way into the Badger’s left –side engine, and blast the wing right off the airplane. Two. Another
Badger was three miles ahead. Patience, she told herself. You have a big speed advantage. She nearly forgot that the Russian bomber had tail guns. A Soviet sergeant reminded her of it, missing, but scaring the hell out of her. The Eagle jerked in a six-g turn to the left and closed on a parallel course before turning in. the next burst from her cannon exploded the Badger in midair, and she had to dive to avoid the wreckage. The engagement lasted all of ninety seconds, and she was wringing wet with perspiration. “Butch, where are you?” “I got one! Buns, I got one!” The Eagle pulled up alongside. Nakamura looked around. Suddenly the sky was clear. Where had they all gone? “Navy Hawk-One, this is Golf, do you read, over?” “Roger, Golf.” “Okay, Navy.
We just smoked four, repeat four, Badgers for you.” “Make that five, Buns!” the other element leader called in.
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Although Larry's (Bond) name does not appear on the title page, this book is as much his as mine. We never did figure out the division of labor, but what Larry and I accomplished was to complete a book as co-authors when our only contract was a handshake-and have a whole lot of fun doing it! It is for the reader to decide how successful we have been.--Author's Note. Bond is co-holder of the 1986 copyright.
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