HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Oxford Guide to Arthurian Literature and…
Loading...

The Oxford Guide to Arthurian Literature and Legend (Oxford Quick…

by Alan Lupack

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1792100,670 (4.27)1
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 1 mention

Showing 2 of 2
In the late sixties studying the significance of the Arthurian legends become surprisingly mainstream both in academic circles and in popular culture, spawning a library fit for a modern-day Tower of Babel. Alan Lupack’s Guide is the kind of vademecum that many students yearned for in those early days.

This massive survey (nearly 500 pages in the 2007 paperback edition) aims to introduce the general reader to a study of the Arthurian legends. As well as a general bibliography of basic resources for such a study, each of its seven chapters concludes with its own more detailed bibliography. These seven chapters deal with historical approaches to Arthur from early literature through to historical novels, followed by the romance tradition inaugurated by Chrétien de Troyes. Then come specified chapters on Malory, the Holy Grail, Gawain, Merlin and, last but not least, Tristan and Isolt. As well as an indispensable index, the author includes a cross-referencing dictionary of Arthurian people, places and things, ranging from Accolon to Yvain.

Lupack’s approach is typically North American in its thoroughness: wide-ranging research, spot-on synopses and punchy summaries. For all its encyclopaedic coverage I would still have liked a more personal response at times, the sort of response that indicates what drives an academic to root around in all those obscure corners of the Arthurian mythos and which occasionally surfaces, as in his Afterword: “The stories of Arthur and the knights and ladies of his court are so enduring because their themes are universal... In its great variety of tales and characters, the Arthurian legend seems a perfect medium for expressing concerns that are both personal and global, ideals as well as fears, aspirations as well as anxieties.”

Authoritative but also fascinating, and perfect for dipping into as well as for reference, this Oxford Guide to Arthurian Literature and Legend surely is to the Arthurian enthusiast as the Roman Virgil was to the medieval Dante. Whether this leads you to purgatory, hell or paradise is another matter however; for me, this took me into that wonderful limbo that libraries encapsulate, where one reference draws you to another, and another, and so on till you risk losing track of time.

http://wp.me/p2oNj1-mq ( )
  ed.pendragon | Apr 28, 2013 |
More for reference than something to read right through. Very useful, pretty thorough listings of Arthuriana from the beginning to very recently, including historical fiction like Bernard Cornwell's trilogy. I checked it on a couple of things other books leave out, and it had them, so I'm pretty impressed.

Might be a good place to get recommendations, too. The contents is pretty thorough, should work to narrow it down, and it has a brief introduction to/discussion of pretty much everything it mentions. ( )
  shanaqui | Apr 9, 2013 |
Showing 2 of 2
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Introduction
*
A legend with its origins in the Middle Ages and its focus on a king and the nobles of his court might seem to have little relevance to the modern world, especially to western Europe and North American were democratic values and ideals prevail.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 019921509X, Paperback)

The Oxford Guide to Arthurian Literature and Legend is both a critical history of the Arthurian tradition and a reference guide to Arthurian works, names, characters, symbols, and places. Seven essays offer a comprehensive survey of the legends in all of their manifestations, from their origins in medieval literature to their adaptation in modern literature, arts, film, and popular culture. It also demonstrates the tremendous continuity of the legends by examining the ways that they have been reinterpreted over the years. The indispensable reference on the subject, it also contains encyclopedic entries, bibliographies, and a comprehensive index. The extensive chapter-by-chapter bibliographies, which are subdivided by topic, augment the general bibliography of Arthurian resources.
Comprehensive in its analysis and hypertextual in its approach, the Oxford Guide to Arthurian Literature and Legend is an essential reference book for Arthurian scholars, medievalists, and for those interested in cultural studies of myth and legend.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:12:17 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

The Oxford Guide to Arthurian Literature and Legend is both a critical history of the Arthurian tradition and a reference guide to Arthurian works, names, and symbols. It offers a comprehensive survey of the legends in all of their manifestations, from their origins to their adaptation in modern literature, arts, film and popular culture. Not only does it analyse familiar Arthurian characters and themes, it also demonstrates the tremendous continuity of the legends by examining the ways that they have been reinterpreted over the years. This indispensable guide contains seven essays that trace the development of the Arthurian legend, encyclopedic entries, bibliographies and a comprehensive index. The essays explore the chronicle and romance traditions, the influence of Malory, the Grail legend, the figures of Gawain and Merlin, and the story of Tristan and Isolt. The entries offer quick and easy reference and extensive bibliographies augment the general bibliography of Arthurian resources.… (more)

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.27)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
4 8
4.5
5 3

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 137,317,571 books! | Top bar: Always visible