HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

People Who Eat Darkness: The True Story of a…
Loading...

People Who Eat Darkness: The True Story of a Young Woman Who Vanished from…

by Richard Lloyd Parry

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3422232,058 (3.87)20
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 20 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 22 (next | show all)
Fascinating look inside the Japanese criminal court system. As a former crime/courts reporter, I connected with many of Parry's observations in covering a high-profile missing person/murder case -- the intense pressure on victims' families in how their grief should appear in public, for example, and the frustrating attempts to understand someone accused of horrifying acts. ( )
  katherinesayre | Oct 22, 2013 |
Such a thoughtful approach to such a sensational case. ( )
  allison.sivak | Jul 9, 2013 |
Murder in a foreign land and the strange culture of Japan. Better than Truman Capote’s IN COLD BLOOD? PEOPLE WHO EAT DARKNESS is on an entirely different level where the facts are the facts and the ambience is weaved from the tightly drawn threads of two societies. My complete review is available at my book review blog, http://www.tgblogger.com/?p=1533#more-1533 ( )
  LynBarTri | Jun 30, 2013 |
Like so many books there was too much detail that didn't move the story forward. It was a bizarre and compelling true crime story well told by a journalist for the Times of London who headed the bureau in Tokyo. At times it was eerie. It is well worth a detour if true crime is your think. I happen to like journalistic writing which this is. ( )
  SigmundFraud | Jun 23, 2013 |
I was dimly aware of the Lucie Blackman case, having seen headlines about it over the years, but I hadn't realized just how sordid the whole story was, and how much evil and pathos was involved. Parry became intimately familiar with the victim, her family and her friends and got as close to the killer as was possible. He also does a good job describing Japanese police procedures and the Japanese courts system, which is vastly different from Western models. This book reinforced my resolve to never, never set foot in Japan.

I have read a lot of crime stories, but Joji Obara seriously creeped me out and I would not be at all surprised if he was responsible for more deaths than the authorities are aware of. If you like detailed case studies of violent crime, this is for you. ( )
  meggyweg | Jun 14, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 22 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
For Mum and Dad
First words
Lucie wakes up late, as usual.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0374230595, Paperback)

Lucie Blackman—tall, blond, twenty-one years old—stepped out into the vastness of Tokyo in the summer of 2000, and disappeared forever. The following winter, her dismembered remains were found buried in a seaside cave.
 
Richard Lloyd Parry, an award-winning foreign correspondent, covered Lucie’s disappearance and followed the massive search for her, the long investigation, and the even longer trial. Over ten years, he earned the trust of her family and friends, won unique access to the Japanese detectives and Japan’s convoluted legal system, and delved deep into the mind of the man accused of the crime, Joji Obara, described by the judge as “unprecedented and extremely evil.”

The result is a book at once thrilling and revelatory, “In Cold Blood for our times” (Chris Cleave, author of Incendiary and Little Bee).
 
The People Who Eat Darkness is one of Publishers Weekly's Top 10 Best Books of 2012

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:39:23 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

Richard Lloyd Parry, an award-winning foreign correspondent, chronicles the 2000 disappearance, massive search, long investigation, and the even longer murder trial behind the gruesome murder case of Lucie Blackman in Japan.

» see all 4 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
257 wanted3 pay2 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.87)
0.5
1 2
1.5 1
2 3
2.5 2
3 23
3.5 5
4 34
4.5 15
5 22

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 91,652,970 books! | Top bar: Always visible