HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Undaunted Courage: Meriwether Lewis, Thomas…
Loading...

Undaunted Courage: Meriwether Lewis, Thomas Jefferson, and the Opening of… (1996)

by Stephen E. Ambrose

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
5,533611,202 (4.09)123
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 123 mentions

English (59)  German (2)  All languages (61)
Showing 1-5 of 59 (next | show all)
I'm not sure how I'd rate this book. In the beginning I was bored and actually had a hard time getting into it. I know that was there to give you an insight on how he became the person he was up to the expedition but for me I just didn't care. When they finally got on their way I pulled out my map and followed along which was the whole point of me reading this book. Then as they encountered different tribes and his remarks or his manipulative ways or how he just assumed he knew more then the Indians did instead of listening to them. Also, when he had two valuable resoursces for translation and he didnt use them he made me mad and he just became an unlikable person to me and I found myself wishing they wouldn't of succeeded. When they were done with the expedition I wanted to stop reading but I was curious as to what could have driven him to suicide.
So this is why I am having a hard time rating it. I didn't just read a book and then I was done. I read a book that took me not just on an expedition but brought Lewis to a level I could sympathize with, get mad at and upset with. I also felt some empathy for Lewis and could even relate to him a little. With all that I still found myself saying.. "Man! I wish I was done with this book!" ( )
1 vote Wapil | Mar 23, 2019 |
I'm not sure how I'd rate this book. In the beginning I was bored and actually had a hard time getting into it. I know that was there to give you an insight on how he became the person he was up to the expedition but for me I just didn't care. When they finally got on their way I pulled out my map and followed along which was the whole point of me reading this book. Then as they encountered different tribes and his remarks or his manipulative ways or how he just assumed he knew more then the Indians did instead of listening to them. Also, when he had two valuable resoursces for translation and he didnt use them he made me mad and he just became an unlikable person to me and I found myself wishing they wouldn't of succeeded. When they were done with the expedition I wanted to stop reading but I was curious as to what could have driven him to suicide.
So this is why I am having a hard time rating it. I didn't just read a book and then I was done. I read a book that took me not just on an expedition but brought Lewis to a level I could sympathize with, get mad at and upset with. I also felt some empathy for Lewis and could even relate to him a little. With all that I still found myself saying.. "Man! I wish I was done with this book!" ( )
  Wapil | Mar 23, 2019 |
It seems as much a biography of Merriwether Lewis as it was a story of the expedition. Some parts are in great detail and other parts of the trip seem to be glossed over. ( )
  ffifield | Oct 7, 2018 |
Changed the way I thought about writing history--and a hell of a story. One of those books that, the day you finish it, you'll bother everyone you know about reading it. ( )
  Stubb | Aug 28, 2018 |
This book really focuses on Lewis. It does place him on a broad tapestry. I learned, for example, that Aaron Burr wanted to turn trans-Appalachia into a separate country. There was quite a bit of discussion of the Federalists vs the Republicans. My US history is pretty shaky so it was very nice to learn a lot of this. Still, the focus stays centered on Lewis.

I am planning a bike ride that will go through the Bitterroot Valley in Montana. The geography is pretty complicated up there. I can't say that this book helped me get it straightened out... The Bitterroot Mountains are on the west side of the continental divide. The book doesn't make any mistakes about that, but doesn't get it crisp and clear either. It sort of marches right through the complexity. But that got me staring at various maps and scratching my head. It's complex terrain up there!

It's a great fun read, a delightful way to learn some history. ( )
1 vote kukulaj | Feb 10, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 59 (next | show all)
- conveyed with passionate enthusiasm by Mr. Ambrose and sprinkled liberally with some of the most famous and vivid passages from the travelers' journals.
 

» Add other authors (3 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Ambrose, Stephen E.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
Whitener, BarrettReadersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
"Of courage undaunted, possessing a firmness & perseverance of purpose which nothing but impossibilities could divert from it's [sic] direction, careful as a father of those committed to his charge, yet steady in the maintenance of order & discipline, intimate with the Indian character, customs & principles, habituated to the hunting life, guarded by exact observation of the vegetables & animals of his own country, against losing tine in the description of objects already possessed, honest, disinterested, liberal, of sound understanding and a fidelity to truth so scrupulous that whatever he should report would be as certain as if seen by ourselves, with all these qualifications as if selected and implanted by nature in one body, for this express purpose, I could have no hesitation in confiding the enterprise to him."

    
—Thomas Jefferson

      
on Meriwether Lewis
Dedication
For Bob Tubbs
First words
From the west-facing window of the room in which Meriwether Lewis was born on August 8, 1774, one could look out at Rockfish Gap, in the Blue Ridge Mountains, an opening to the West that invited exploration.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
ISBNs 0671574434 and 0743508084: abridged audiobook read by Cotter Smith. Do not combine the abridged audiobook with the book since they are not the same work.
Audiobook - Unknown if part 1, part 2, or the entire book combined.
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Book description
Haiku summary
Found no direct water way
But ate dog courageously
Jefferson ate none
(John_Vaughan)

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0684826976, Paperback)

A biography of Meriwether Lewis that relies heavily on the journals of both Lewis and Clark, this book is also backed up by the author's personal travels along Lewis and Clark's route to the Pacific. Ambrose is not content to simply chronicle the events of the "Corps of Discovery" as the explorers called their ventures. He often pauses to assess the military leadership of Lewis and Clark, how they negotiated with various native peoples and what they reported to Jefferson. Though the expedition failed to find Jefferson's hoped for water route to the Pacific, it fired interest among fur traders and other Americans, changing the face of the West forever.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:08:21 -0400)

(see all 8 descriptions)

Chronicles the experiences of Meriwether Lewis, the man chosen by President Jefferson to lead a voyage from the Missouri River to the Pacific Ocean, discusses the experiences of those who took part in the expedition, and tells of the leading political, scientific, and military figures involved in the mapping of the American West.… (more)

» see all 10 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.09)
0.5
1 6
1.5 2
2 20
2.5 9
3 131
3.5 35
4 326
4.5 52
5 273

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 134,738,021 books! | Top bar: Always visible