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Riders of the Purple Sage by Zane Grey
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Riders of the Purple Sage (1912)

by Zane Grey

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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1,308479,171 (3.43)127
  1. 10
    A Study in Scarlet by Arthur Conan Doyle (TineOliver)
    TineOliver: Both books deal with views on Mormonism by outsiders at the beginning of the 20th Century. This recommendation is only for those who are interested in this aspect as the novels cover different genres.
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» See also 127 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 46 (next | show all)
Digital audiobook read by John Bolen.

From the book jacket: Cottonwoods, Utah, 1871. A woman stands accused. A man, sentenced to whipping. In … rides … Lassiter, a notorious gunman who’s come to avenge his sister’s death. It doesn’t take Lassiter long to see that this once-peaceful Mormon community is controlled by the corrupt Deacon Tull – a powerful elder who’s trying to take the woman’s land by forcing her to marry him, branding her foreman a dangerous “outsider.” Lassiter vows to help them. But when the ranch is attacked by horse thieves, cattle rustlers, and a mysterious Masked Rider, he realizes they’re up against something bigger, and more brutal, than the land itself…

My reactions
I hardly know what to write about this classic of the Western genre. It’s full of adventure, violence, strong men and women, tenderness, brutality and an abiding sense of justice. And, of course, there is the landscape, which Grey paints so vividly it is practically a character.

Yes, the storyline and dialogue are a bit melodramatic. But Grey’s story still captured this reader’s imagination with its sense of drama, almost non-stop action, and bold characters. I was reminded of the many western movies I watched with my Daddy in the ‘50s and ‘60s. They were exciting and the good guys always won. Clearly those movies (and other books of the genre) had Grey’s strong foundation on which to build. I’m glad I finally read it.

The digital audio available through my library’s Overdrive system was read by John Bolen. I was not a great fan of his delivery, which seemed overly dramatic to me. I might have enjoyed this better had I read the text. ( )
  BookConcierge | Jun 7, 2019 |
Though a reader's patience will well be tested by Jane Withersteen,
Zane Grey's lush descriptions of Utah's wilderness carry the rather slow moving plot to a bunch of rip roaring endings.

"...and clouds of yellow dust drifted under the cottonwoods out over the sage."

"...a sharp clip-crop of iron shod hoofs deadened and died away." ( )
  m.belljackson | Aug 3, 2018 |
This was my first experience with a classic western by Zane Grey ... and my last if I have anything to say about it. I'm just not into westerns. I don't have much else to say other than it's not my thing - I don't like the environment, the 'cowboy' perspective, etc. etc. I tried. ( )
  justagirlwithabook | Aug 1, 2018 |
Riders of the Purple Sage by Zane Grey
Recall a band by this name and love their music. This book starts out with a few men who tend to Jane Withersteen's horses that she's raising and selling after training them.
In Utal the Mormoms rule the land and they want her land and round up men to steal her horses. Before she knows it a little come Fay comes to stay with her because the woman taking care of her has died.
There are many trouble and upheavals during this book involving many different sets of people. Liked the scenery because it is so descriptive from the daybreak to the full sun and at dusk-the purple sage is always being described.
Love how they band together and make a run for it. Learned so much about this area-even gold! Great Book. ( )
  jbarr5 | Mar 27, 2018 |
In several instances the characters act in an overly theatrical fashion that made me think of the exaggerated affect of characters in silent movies. Relatedly, there are also some plot devices that are cloying, going overboard playing on the reader's sympathies. There are a few undeveloped characters that are bumped off like the expendable crew on Star Trek. Who were they? Some of the scenes went on long after they had served their purpose.

In spite of all these problems there was a strong plot line that maintained my interest. In addition, the main character's struggle to break free from the dysfunctional obedience of a stern religious upbringing was interesting. I also liked the description of the Utah landscape. ( )
  bkinetic | Jan 22, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 46 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (10 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Zane Greyprimary authorall editionscalculated
Bramhall, MarkNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mitchell, Lee ClarkIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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A sharp clip-clop of iron-shod hoofs deadened and died away, and clouds of yellow dust drifted from under the cottonwoods out over the sage.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0812966120, Paperback)

Told by a master storyteller who, according to critic Russell Nye, “combined adventure, action, violence, crisis, conflict, sentimentalism, and sex in an extremely shrewd mixture,” Riders of the Purple Sage is a classic of the Western genre. It is the story of Lassiter, a gunslinging avenger in black, who shows up in a remote Utah town just in time to save the young and beautiful rancher Jane Withersteen from having to marry a Mormon elder against her will. Lassiter is on his own quest, one that ends when he discovers a secret grave on Jane’s grounds. “[Zane Grey’s] popularity was neither accidental nor undeserved,” wrote Nye. “Few popular novelists have possessed such a grasp of what the public wanted and few have developed Grey’s skill at supplying it.”

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:12:37 -0400)

(see all 8 descriptions)

Set in Utah during the nineteenth century, tells the story of a Mormon woman caught between the persecution of religious zealots and several 'Gentile' gunmen seeking to lend her a helping hand.

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Penguin Australia

An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

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Tantor Media

2 editions of this book were published by Tantor Media.

Editions: 1400100623, 1400109175

Recorded Books

An edition of this book was published by Recorded Books.

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