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Finders Keepers

by Stephen King

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Bill Hodges Trilogy (2)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
2,8551593,476 (3.96)1 / 127
"A masterful, intensely suspenseful novel about a reader whose obsession with a reclusive writer goes far too far--a book about the power of storytelling, starring the same trio of unlikely and winning heroes King introduced in Mr. Mercedes" -- ""Wake up, genius." So begins King's instantly riveting story about a vengeful reader. The genius is John Rothstein, an iconic author who created a famous character, Jimmy Gold, but who hasn't published a book for decades. Morris Bellamy is livid, not just because Rothstein has stopped providing books, but because the nonconformist Jimmy Gold has sold out for a career in advertising. Morris kills Rothstein and empties his safe of cash, yes, but the real treasure is a trove of notebooks containing at least one more Gold novel. Morris hides the money and the notebooks, and then he is locked away for another crime. Decades later, a boy named Pete Saubers finds the treasure, and now it is Pete and his family that Bill Hodges, Holly Gibney, and Jerome Robinson must rescue from the ever-more deranged and vengeful Morris when he's released from prison after thirty-five years" --… (more)
  1. 30
    Mr. Mercedes by Stephen King (sturlington, Anonymous user)
    sturlington: Finders Keepers is the sequel to Mr. Mercedes
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» See also 127 mentions

English (152)  Italian (2)  Danish (2)  French (1)  German (1)  All languages (158)
Showing 1-5 of 152 (next | show all)
King has done it again.. Can't wait for the next one! ( )
  Absolution13 | Oct 6, 2020 |
Good book but found it lacking a full 5 star rating. ( )
  gac53 | Sep 29, 2020 |
Many years ago I wrote a review of ”The Cycle of the Werewolf”. I noted how the illustrations in that book were a perfect metaphor for a lot of King's work. There were full colour, graphic images and contrasting small, subtle, black and white sketches - I found the subtle sketches were more evocative and chilling than the more blatant, bloody colour images. King often referred to the use of the "gross-out" as a tool in his stories. I always felt they were the less effective parts of his books, like the colour plates in “Cycle of the Werewolf”. But on saying all of that - the "de-gloving" in “Gerald's Game” was perhaps, the best and most memorable part of that book (and for me the most memorable image in all of King's work).

I can see why Mr. King is so prolific: this apparently off-the-cuff book is more appealing than most authors' carefully finessed prose. I don't usually read horror (too squeamish). Can we categorise King’s fiction in anyway? Not really. Low brow, high-brow? I suspect Mr. King knows this and is being facetious with his fiction. “La donna è mobile” isn't really "high culture" by itself. It's an intentional earworm to be whistled and played on barrel organs in the streets, and which reflects the lightweight insouciance of the Duke of Mantua. Then again it's also filled with dramatic irony, as the womaniser who accuses women of fickleness will have his life saved by the self-sacrifice of the steadfast and virtuous Gilda, even after she knows his true character. So there you have it, Rigoletto is both high and low culture; it's both sublime tragedy and the Harry Enfield music. Whereas the Rolling Stones are just a bunch of overpaid wrinkly old twats. I just had to get that off my chest. ;)

King used to compare his books to Big Macs...he wasn't wrong mostly. ( )
  antao | Aug 20, 2020 |
A bit quicker paced than the first book (I thought), it was a solid read. Not from King's fright night side, more of a thriller with a few foreshadows for the next book. Fun but quick read. ( )
  kodermike | Jul 31, 2020 |
Told in three parts Finders Keepers deals with a reader gone crazy, a desperate teenage boy, and Bill Hodges, Jerome, and Holly to the rescue.

Part one was really slow and I found myself getting tired while reading. Long story short we follow two of the characters during part one. Morris Bellamy and Pete Saunders. Both of them are lovers of John Rothstein's Jimmy Gold series. However, Morris becomes obsessed when he doesn't like the way Rothstein ended his series (sound familiar?) and he and two other people break into Rothstein's home. Morris uses Rothstein's hidden money as a lure to his two conspirators. However, Morris real goal is to punish Rothstein for ruining Jimmy Gold.

I was the least surprised reader when Morris killed Rothstein (not spoiling it's in the book summary) and then steals Rothstein's unpublished works and money. Morris is arrested for a separate crime, however, he managed to bury Rothstein's money and works in a trunk near his childhood home.

We segue into Pete's backstory with his family having to deal with the fallout from his father left crippled from the actions of the Mercedes Killer. It was interesting to read another character's perspective of that event that largeyly filled book one in this trilogy. Pete finds Morris's hidden trunk and uses that money to help out his family. Unfortunately, Morris is out for revenge against whomever stole his hidden treasure.

Bill Hodges and company show up in part two. Bill is running his own company with Holly. Jerome is off at college though the three of them are still close.

Morris unlike the Mercedes Killer was very shallowly written. I swear apparently to make a mass murderer (Mercedes Killer) and a killer and rapist (Morris) you must have a horrible mother. I could see why Morris becomes obsessed with the character of Jimmy Gold. However, everything that follows just makes him an unhinged unsympathetic character. And his actions that follows really doesn't make sense. Why go around threatening and killing anyone after you just got of jail? At least let him go about doing things intelligently.

Pete I could see why he came to love Rothstein's books. However, he really does win the TSTL title in this book. Everything he does makes things worse and when he is offered help turns it down because he thinks he can make it better (hint he doesn't).

Bill, Holly, and Jerome are treated as tertiary characters in this book. Bill has become obsessed with the Mercedes Killer and his possible faking his brain injury. There are so many clues King leaves in this book it's pretty apparent how book three is going to go. And that's my whole problem. This book is 100% filler. Calling it book two of the Bill Hodges trilogy is disengious. Morris and Pete were not enough to carry this book.

It doesn't help the pacing was really bad throughout. I know that if this had not been a Stephen King book I would have stopped reading this book after part one.

I found the ending to just kind of happen. I found myself wholly uninterested in book three and can say that I plan on skipping it.

ETA: I totally read the third book. ( )
  ObsidianBlue | Jul 1, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 152 (next | show all)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Stephen Kingprimary authorall editionscalculated
Rekiaro, IlkkaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
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Epigraph
"It is by going down into the abyss that we recover the treasures of life." Joseph Campbell
"Shit don't mean shit." Jimmy Gold
Dedication
Thinking of John D. MacDonald
First words
"Wake up, genius."
Quotations
For readers, one of life’s most electrifying discoveries is that they are readers—not just capable of doing it (which Morris already knew), but in love with it. Hopelessly. Head over heels. The first book that does that is never forgotten, and each page seems to bring a fresh revelation, one that burns and exalts: Yes! That’s how it is! Yes! I saw that, too! And, of course, That’s what I think! That’s what I FEEL!
A good novelist does not lead his characters, he follows them. A good novelist does not create events, he watches them happen and then writes down what he sees.
No. I was going to say his work changed my life, but that’s not right. I don’t think a teenager has much of a life to change. I just turned eighteen last month. I guess what I mean is his work changed my heart.
Shit don't mean shit.
His chief interest was in reading fiction, then trying to analyze what he had read, fitting it into a larger pattern.
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Information from the French Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
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"A masterful, intensely suspenseful novel about a reader whose obsession with a reclusive writer goes far too far--a book about the power of storytelling, starring the same trio of unlikely and winning heroes King introduced in Mr. Mercedes" -- ""Wake up, genius." So begins King's instantly riveting story about a vengeful reader. The genius is John Rothstein, an iconic author who created a famous character, Jimmy Gold, but who hasn't published a book for decades. Morris Bellamy is livid, not just because Rothstein has stopped providing books, but because the nonconformist Jimmy Gold has sold out for a career in advertising. Morris kills Rothstein and empties his safe of cash, yes, but the real treasure is a trove of notebooks containing at least one more Gold novel. Morris hides the money and the notebooks, and then he is locked away for another crime. Decades later, a boy named Pete Saubers finds the treasure, and now it is Pete and his family that Bill Hodges, Holly Gibney, and Jerome Robinson must rescue from the ever-more deranged and vengeful Morris when he's released from prison after thirty-five years" --

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Book description
"Wake up, genius." So begins King's instantly riveting story about a vengeful reader. The genius is John Rothstein, an iconic author who created a famously beloved character, Jimmy Gold, but who hasn't published a book for decades. Morris Bellamy is livid, not just because Rothstein has stopped providing books, but because the non-conformist Jimmy Gold sold out for a career in advertising. Morris kills Rothstein and empties his safe of cash, yes, but the real treasure is a trove of notebooks containing at least one more Gold novel.

Morris hides the money and the notebooks, and then he is locked away in a high-security prison for a different crime. Decades later, a young teen named Pete Saubers, whose father was injured in the Mr. Mercedes killings, finds the treasure, and now it is Pete and his family whom Bill Hodges, Holly Gibney, and Jerome Robinson must rescue from the ever-more-deranged and vengeful Morris when he is released from prison after thirty-five years - and wants his money and his notebooks back.
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