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The Saucier's Apprentice: One Long Strange…
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The Saucier's Apprentice: One Long Strange Trip through the Great Cooking…

by Bob Spitz

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Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
Got a great artichoke recipe out of it. ( )
  euroclewis | Jun 8, 2016 |
A delicious tour of European cooking schools undertaken by a man recovering from personal disasters. The tone is perfect, and the descriptions are yummy. Don't read this one on an empty stomach. A fun time. ( )
  mikerr | Apr 22, 2010 |
Bob is unhappy. Bob is having a midlife crisis. His wife is divorcing him. His new girlfriend doesn't seem to want him, either. What's a guy to do?--Embark on tour of cooking schools in France and Italy, that's what!

Bob Spitz' memoir of touring France and Italy to learn how to cook just doesn't hold up. It's not just the whiny, pretentious writing style, although that doesn't make the going any easier. I'll even forgive the never-ending self-analysis and introspection - after all, the guy is going through a divorce. I don't know, however, how he managed to wangle positions in so many great kitchens (was it his reputation as a writer of a famous Beatles biography?). I don't know why, even after he admitted he was no great cook, he expected to get to do more than prep vegetables in the corner - although apparently several great chefs took pity on him and gave him some private cooking lessons. But despite it all, nothing satisfied him, and he bounced around from place to place, giving the reader a quick glimpse of cooking schools and great kitchens before he packed his bags and moved on.

In the end, I realized I didn't like the book because I didn't like the author very much. Apparently, by his own admission, not very many other people he met liked him either, yet he always seem mystified at his reception. I couldn't help thinking, as I closed the cover, that he might have done better to spend his trip money on a good therapist. ( )
  OliviainNJ | Aug 30, 2009 |
I came to like this book only after reading the whole book. The journey of cooking through Europe was a realistic one and not always pretty if you are eager as Bob was and serious about learning. Recipes added are highly useful in spite of encountering some very rich ingredients in France especially. ( )
  ellabellie | Jan 11, 2009 |
A few good scenes but very whiny. ( )
  ntgntg | Oct 15, 2008 |
Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
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For Becky Aikman, who brings all the right ingredients
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It's a wonder any of us survived those Friday-night dinners.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0393060594, Hardcover)

The education of a barbarian in the temples of haute cuisine.

In the blink of an eye, Bob Spitz turned fifty, finished an eight-year book project and a fourteen-year marriage that left him nearly destitute, had his heart stolen and broken on the rebound, and sought salvation the only way he knew how. He fled to Europe, where he hopscotched among the finest cooking schools in pursuit of his dream. The urge to cook like a virtuoso, to unravel the mysteries of the process, had become an obsession.

Spitz hit the fabled cooking-school circuit in a series of idyllic European villages, and The Saucier's Apprentice is a chronicle of his exploits. Combining an outrageous travelogue with gastronomic lore, hands-on cooking instruction, hot-tempered chefs, local personalities, and a batch of memorable recipes, Spitz's odyssey recounts the transformation of a professional writer—and lifelong kitchen amateur—into a world-class cook.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:25:06 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

"In the blink of an eye, Bob Spitz turned fifty, finished an eight-year book project and a fourteen-year marriage that left him nearly destitute, had his heart stolen and broken on the rebound, and sought salvation the only way he knew how. He fled to Europe, where he hopscotched among the finest cooking schools in pursuit of his dream. The urge to cook like a virtuoso, to unravel the mysteries of the process, was too tantalizing to resist." "Spitz hit the fabled cooking-school circuit in a series of idyllic European villages, and The Saucier's Apprentice is a chronicle of his exploits. From Burgundy to Paris, Gascony to Provence, Tuscany to the Amalfi Coast, he worked alongside the masters of haute cuisine in their kitchens, prying their secrets from them. Around each corner, the relentless search for the perfect meal, the perfect relationship.""Combining an outrageous travelogue with gastronomic lore, hands-on cooking instruction, hot-tempered chefs, local personalities, and a batch of memorable recipes, Spitz's odyssey recounts the transformation of a professional writer - and lifelong kitchen amateur - into a world-class cook."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

» see all 2 descriptions

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W.W. Norton

2 editions of this book were published by W.W. Norton.

Editions: 0393060594, 0393335380

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