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Not For Profit: Why Democracy Needs the…
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Not For Profit: Why Democracy Needs the Humanities (The Public Square) (2010)

by Martha C. Nussbaum

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A reformist protest against the dystopian future of education portended by the increasing emphasis on "practical" results at all levels. Reads like a column in the New York Times. It draws heavily on the educational philosophy of Rabindranath Tagore, in addition to Rousseau, Dewey, and others. ( )
  dmac7 | Jun 14, 2013 |
It's pathetic that we live in a society that so little values the humanities that scholars like Nussbaum feel compelled to defend them. Nussbaum's defense of the value of the humanities is informed, intelligent, thoughtful, and obvious. She could have summed up her arguments in a lengthy essay rather than a book but the points she repeats are worth repeating. ( )
  Sullywriter | Apr 3, 2013 |
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[An] impassioned (if somewhat preachy) argument in favor of study of the humanities. She suggests, contra the critics, that “the liberal arts portion of college and university education in the United States now supports democratic citizenship better than it did fifty years ago.” Her concern is with the diminishing place given to the liberal arts in many institutions: their marginalization by technocratic and business-oriented demands
 
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Voor Lois Goutman, Marthr Melchior, Marion Stearns en al mijnleraren aan de Baldwin School
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Dans ce manifeste original et argumenté, Martha Nussbaum montre comment les humanités nous font accéder à la culture des émotions , à l'imagination narrative . Ce n'est pas à coup de débat d'idées abstraites que s'imposeront l'égalité et la liberté ... C'est en formant , par le biais des émotions démocratiques , le citoyen du 21eme siècle .
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0691140642, Hardcover)

In this short and powerful book, celebrated philosopher Martha Nussbaum makes a passionate case for the importance of the liberal arts at all levels of education.

Historically, the humanities have been central to education because they have rightly been seen as essential for creating competent democratic citizens. But recently, Nussbaum argues, thinking about the aims of education has gone disturbingly awry both in the United States and abroad. Anxiously focused on national economic growth, we increasingly treat education as though its primary goal were to teach students to be economically productive rather than to think critically and become knowledgeable and empathetic citizens. This shortsighted focus on profitable skills has eroded our ability to criticize authority, reduced our sympathy with the marginalized and different, and damaged our competence to deal with complex global problems. And the loss of these basic capacities jeopardizes the health of democracies and the hope of a decent world.

In response to this dire situation, Nussbaum argues that we must resist efforts to reduce education to a tool of the gross national product. Rather, we must work to reconnect education to the humanities in order to give students the capacity to be true democratic citizens of their countries and the world.

Drawing on the stories of troubling--and hopeful--educational developments from around the world, Nussbaum offers a manifesto that should be a rallying cry for anyone who cares about the deepest purposes of education.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:25:08 -0400)

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"Philosopher Martha Nussbaum makes a passionate case for the importance of the liberal arts at all levels of education. Nussbaum argues that we must resist efforts to reduce education to a tool of the gross national product. Rather, we must work to reconnect education to the humanities in order to give students the capacity to be true democratic citizens of their countries and the world"--Jacket.… (more)

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