Picture of author.

Charles Berlitz (1914–2003)

Author of The Bermuda Triangle

80+ Works 4,000 Members 49 Reviews 3 Favorited

About the Author

Disambiguation Notice:

The language books and the books on mysterious phenomena are by the same author.

Series

Works by Charles Berlitz

The Bermuda Triangle (1974) 921 copies
Native Tongues (1982) 300 copies
The Mystery of Atlantis (1969) 227 copies
The Roswell Incident (1980) 195 copies
Without a Trace (1977) 159 copies
The Dragon's Triangle (1989) 115 copies
German Step-by-Step (1979) 112 copies
Spanish Step-by-Step (1990) 106 copies
Doomsday, 1999 A.D. (1981) 89 copies
Italian Step-by-Step (1979) 82 copies
Passport to French (1600) 48 copies
Irish (Language/30) (1986) 46 copies
Passport to Japanese (1985) 44 copies
Passport to Italian (1972) 38 copies
Passport to Spanish (1974) 37 copies
The Philadelphia Experiment [1984 film] (1984) — Writer — 36 copies
Passport to German (1974) 29 copies
Passport to Chinese (1988) 10 copies
Learn Spanish (1995) 9 copies
Inglês Passo a Passo (1985) 8 copies
Busn To Busn In Germn (1994) 6 copies
Espanhol Passo a Passo (1997) 5 copies
300 fenómenos extraños (1992) 2 copies
Learn Italian (1995) 2 copies
Atlantida 1 copy
Forsvundet (1978) 1 copy

Associated Works

Tagged

Common Knowledge

Canonical name
Berlitz, Charles
Legal name
Berlitz, Charles Frambach
Birthdate
1914-11-20
Date of death
2003-12-18
Gender
male
Nationality
USA
Birthplace
New York, New York, USA
Place of death
Tamarac, Florida, USA
Places of residence
New York, New York, USA
Tamarac, Florida, USA
Education
Yale University
Occupations
linguist
publisher
Relationships
Berlitz, M. D. (grandfather)
Organizations
United States Army
The Berlitz School of Language
Disambiguation notice
The language books and the books on mysterious phenomena are by the same author.

Members

Reviews

Original reading, mid- to late-1990s. Original review when I got LibraryThing in 2006ish (misspelling of weird and all):

A fun weave of half-baked theories and quarter-baked research. Was the US cooking up some wierd stuff? Sure. Did it include invisibility? Probably not. Did Moore and Berlitz have to engage in sloppy scholarship? No.

Second reading in 2023. New review:

To me it appears Moore did the lion's share of research and writing, and Berlitz was tacked on for publicity and sales. Moore appears to have been duped by some folks (on a newspaper clipping that appears to not exist), he is too credulous on Carl Allen, and he bounces around too much to make a proper case. The story of Jessup is the most interesting: his book on U.F.O.s, the annotations (by Allen only?), and the Varo Edition. But Moore is too credulous here too. Better research can now be found on the internet. To rehash my original review: did the U.S. try to make a ship invisible? Most likely not. Was it degaussing blown up by urban legend? Probably. A good book? Not really, but foundational for dozens of others in its ilk of government, conspiracy, ufology, etc.… (more)
½
 
Flagged
tuckerresearch | 1 other review | Nov 30, 2023 |
These types of books intrigued me as a young teen, when, with the remains of my weekly allowance, I could afford cheap Avon and Fawcett paperbacks. Thus I got things like Zecharia Sitchin and Charles Berlitz. This is some more of Berlitz's hackwork. In 1991, you really couldn't check these things. Now, with the internet, you can. I checked up on one, a Frenchman who served his 100 year sentence and was released. Well, no such person appears to have ever existed and it looks like Berlitz plagiarized the story from Ripley's Believe It or Not (not just taken, pretty much plagiarized). This book also has direct repeats of some of the same stories in his similar books: World of Strange Phenomena and World of the Odd and the Awesome. Like he didn't have enough material (this one is shorter in length). A good walk down memory lane, and some interesting stuff.… (more)
½
 
Flagged
tuckerresearch | Mar 22, 2022 |
An extremely interesting nonfiction book about the strange disappearances in and around the Bermuda Triangle, this brief (208 pages) hardcover that I purchased at a library book sale discusses known disappearances and other anomalies (such as maelstroms or whirlpools) within a region of the Atlantic Ocean that the U.S. Navy doesn't officially recognize. Several theories explain the strong magnetic forces at work, including the idea that it is one portal to Hell (the Sea of Japan is said to be the other); that the Triangle is a prime area of alien abduction; and that the forces may be signals from a long-lost, superior civilization (e.g., Atlantis).

Dr. Berlitz discusses all of these theories and more in an easy-to-understand manner, as well as the geological origin of the region. I found all the stories of the disappearances fascinating, especially when one considers that the Florida Keys and much of the Caribbean Sea, a cruise destination, is within it.
… (more)
 
Flagged
Jimbookbuff1963 | 15 other reviews | Jun 5, 2021 |

Lists

Awards

You May Also Like

Associated Authors

Statistics

Works
80
Also by
3
Members
4,000
Popularity
#6,311
Rating
3.1
Reviews
49
ISBNs
336
Languages
23
Favorited
3

Charts & Graphs