Picture of author.
19+ Works 2,852 Members 15 Reviews 1 Favorited

About the Author

Michael Wilcock was director of pastoral studies at Trinity College, Bristol, and then minister of St. Nicholas Church, Durham. He has also written the volumes on Luke, 1 2 Chronicles, Psalms, and Revelation in the Bible Speaks Today series of commentaries.
Image credit: via InterVarsity Press

Works by Michael Wilcock

Associated Works

The New Bible Commentary (1953) — Contributor, some editions — 1,906 copies

Tagged

Common Knowledge

Gender
male

Members

Reviews

A personal classic for the amillenarist, idealistic reading of Revelation which I favour. Read it in translation several years ago, skimmed the original for Sunday school a few years ago, now fully read the original for domestic study. Still merited a leisurely read with full reference to all the Old Testament related texts.

Just wish IVP would reset the text. Seems like a photocopy from a badly printed original.
 
Flagged
leandrod | 5 other reviews | Oct 4, 2017 |
 
Flagged
leandrod | 5 other reviews | Oct 4, 2017 |
Really good commentary on Luke's gospel
 
Flagged
cbinstead | 2 other reviews | Apr 9, 2014 |
Another commentary of a very misunderstood book of the bible: the book of Judges. The book of Judges is actually a collection of stories, with heroes and villains, that occurred in ancient Israel between the settlement of the land under Joshua and the establishment of the monarchy under King Saul: a period of between three to four hundred years. The book is described as having a cyclical pattern, with the Israelites rejecting God, God sending foreign nations to oppress them, the Israelites crying out for release, and then God sending a 'judge' (or more like hero) to rescue the people. However, it is not so much cyclical, but rather it is a continuing downward spiral where everybody does what they see right in their own eyes and the rejection of an objective moral law.
As mentioned, this is a book of heroes and villains, however while the villains are, well, villainous, the heroes are anything but. If anything, they are flawed, and in Samson's case, more of an anti-hero than a hero (what indeed is he doing going into the capital city of his people's enemies simply to visit a prostitute?).
In any case, as with the other commentaries, this book does a good job of exploring the book of Judges and how this book, written probably 3000 years ago, still applies to us today.
… (more)
½
 
Flagged
David.Alfred.Sarkies | 1 other review | Feb 22, 2014 |

You May Also Like

Statistics

Works
19
Also by
1
Members
2,852
Popularity
#8,996
Rating
3.8
Reviews
15
ISBNs
56
Languages
7
Favorited
1

Charts & Graphs