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At Knit's End: Meditations for Women Who Knit Too Much (2005)

by Stephanie Pearl-McPhee

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1,630158,205 (4.33)10
The Yarn Harlot takes time away from her knitting to offer observations, meditations, reflections, and rants to soothe and delight the knitter's unraveled soul. Like golfing, fishing, and gardening, knitting is an obsession. It's an activity fraught with guilt, frustration, over-optimism, sly deception, and compulsion, along with passionate moments of creative enlightenment. Not to mention heaps of yarn you really think you'll knit someday. Stephanie Pearl-McPhee totally understands. In this hilarious collection of tangled reflections, she offers ample reassurance for anyone who has ever wondered, Am I alone in my mania? Casting off with some of her favorite quotations, she muses on why it's impossible to knit too much, how many calories knitting burns (about 90 an hour, not counting the extra for retrieving your ball of yarn from under the couch), and when it's okay to stalk a man in the grocery store (not because he's good-looking, but because he's wearing an Aran sweater you want to know how to knit). The first step toward recovery is getting helpand having a good laugh at your compulsion. At Knit's End is a wicked and wickedly funny fix for any knitter.… (more)
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» See also 10 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 15 (next | show all)
I listened to this on audio, so that may be skewing my opinion. This may be a much better book if you don't read it cover-to-cover, but rather flip through it for an anecdote/"meditation" as desired. It had Pearl-McPhee's typical humor, but it was very repetitive. I could see it more as a daily calendar than as a book. ( )
  ssperson | Apr 3, 2021 |
Picked this up after reading all of the quotes about the book. It's a little frustrating that they're all just short snippets - but that's also part of the fun of it. ( )
  avonar | May 27, 2020 |
A fun book about the obsessions we can develop for yarn, yarn shops, the latest gadgets and all things knitting. Good for times when you only have time for 5 minutes to read or when you just need a pick me up. ( )
  justicefortibet | Aug 3, 2010 |
The following is my personal opinion; you don't have to share it.

I enjoy the Yarn Harlot's stories very much. . . in context. This book has a new tidbit on nearly every page, so I found there to be little flow or cohesiveness that made her other books so pleasurable to read. Additionally, much of the content seemed to be recycled from previous books. I am not a big fan of "quotes," so I didn't feel that those added much to the recycled anecdotes and thoughts.

I also question the use of the subtitle "Meditations for WOMEN who knit too much" (emphasis mine). We're all pretty aware that the knitting world is densely populated with women, but nothing about the content of this book struck me as particularly specific to women. I don't see a reason for the exclusion. Some of the stories do involve her husband and her motherhood experiences, but in my opinion, those seemed translatable to a female partner, or to fatherhood. (Obviously not all readers will be interested in opposite-sex relationships, or in parenthood--I'm merely venturing a guess as to why that subtitle was chosen.)

The book isn't all bad. Its physical size makes it easy to carry in a purse, knitting bag, or even a large pocket, and its format makes it easy to read a few pages and easily put it down again. It might be a fun little stocking stuffer for someone who doesn't own the Yarn Harlot's previous works, or who can't bear to put down the needles for long reads. Personally, though, I would recommend her other books over this one. ( )
2 vote LauraLittlePony | Nov 20, 2009 |
Its great to find a way to laugh at something you hold near and dear. This book is the equivalent of my husband's Uncle John's Bathroom Reader Series. I've placed it in my knitting basket beside my chair and pull it out for a wee bit of humour when the stitches get mussed and the prospect of a massive "frog" leaves me ready to swear off knitting forever... or at least until tomorrow.

If you find yourself bristling when someone tries to "make you smile" then this isn't the book for you. If you're the sort who stands in awe at the fact that "you're a grown up!?!" then you'll likely love this book! ( )
  VriesemaFamily | Mar 9, 2009 |
Showing 1-5 of 15 (next | show all)
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For Joe, Amanda, Megan, and Samantha, who have never said one word about all the yarn. I love them to distraction.
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In High Park, near my home in Toronto, there is a paved circle with a complex path painted on it, completely surrounded by trees and gardens.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Wikipedia in English (3)

The Yarn Harlot takes time away from her knitting to offer observations, meditations, reflections, and rants to soothe and delight the knitter's unraveled soul. Like golfing, fishing, and gardening, knitting is an obsession. It's an activity fraught with guilt, frustration, over-optimism, sly deception, and compulsion, along with passionate moments of creative enlightenment. Not to mention heaps of yarn you really think you'll knit someday. Stephanie Pearl-McPhee totally understands. In this hilarious collection of tangled reflections, she offers ample reassurance for anyone who has ever wondered, Am I alone in my mania? Casting off with some of her favorite quotations, she muses on why it's impossible to knit too much, how many calories knitting burns (about 90 an hour, not counting the extra for retrieving your ball of yarn from under the couch), and when it's okay to stalk a man in the grocery store (not because he's good-looking, but because he's wearing an Aran sweater you want to know how to knit). The first step toward recovery is getting helpand having a good laugh at your compulsion. At Knit's End is a wicked and wickedly funny fix for any knitter.

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HighBridge Audio

An edition of this book was published by HighBridge Audio.

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HighBridge

An edition of this book was published by HighBridge.

» Publisher information page

 

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