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Olympos (2005)

by Dan Simmons

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Ilium-Olympos (2)

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2,880424,808 (3.79)60
Beneath the gaze of the gods, the mighty armies of Greece and Troy met in fierce and glorious combat, scrupulously following the text set forth in Homer's timeless narrative. But that was before twenty-first-century scholar Thomas Hockenberry stirred the bloody brew, causing an enraged Achilles to join forces with his archenemy Hector and turn his murderous wrath on Zeus and the entire pantheon of divine manipulators; before the swift and terrible mechanical creatures that catered for centuries to the pitiful idle remnants of Earth's human race began massing in the millions, to exterminate rather than serve. And now all bets are off.… (more)
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» See also 60 mentions

English (40)  Dutch (1)  French (1)  All languages (42)
Showing 1-5 of 40 (next | show all)
Ilium and Olympos are hardly seperate books, so I have included my review for Ilium below since it applies just as much to Olympos as it did to Ilium.

You'd think, that after Ilium, the "magic" would be kind of gone. We have explored Ilium, Mars and Earth a bit, so Olympos should give us some answers. Except, Simmons doesn't seem to care for that at all and starts to throw all kinds of crazy at the reader in this one. If someone should tell me that they hated the book for doing this to them and then even at the end given them no real satisfaction, I would understand completely. However, it didn't bother me at all. I was content just being dragged through this ludicrous story and being left in just as much confusion as I was at the start. I don't really know why, but I feel that that's ok.

(Review for Ilium)

Clearly, Dan Simmons must be insane.

I read the back of the book, I read Simmons before, I should have been prepared.
Seriously though, I loved this book. I read the Iliad during my last year of high school, so a lot of it came back to me reading this, which was nice. I have no knowledge whatsoever about Shakespeare (or Proust) which made some of the more poetically inclined chapters a bit abstract to me. This is of course not Simmons fault, but it did make me feel that I missed out on a piece of the grander story. Also, it did genuinely make me want to know about the plays by Shakespeare, how about that.

There is something about Simmons writing that makes me lose any concept of "sensible". Simmons goes: "Trojan war on parralel universe earth and gods on Mars" and I go: "Okay, go on". Simmons goes: "Robots reflecting on Shakespeare and Proust on the moons of Jupiter" and I go: "Fine". Simmons goes: "Quantum Teleportation, Brane Holes, Little Green Men, Invisibility Hat" and I don't even blink an eye. Any other writer would have got me shouting at the book "Get it together man! This is just getting too much too fast, where in gods name are you going with this?", but for some reason Simmons makes me go: "Sure". This is some kind of magic I thourougly enjoy, and I will be reading much more of Dan Simmons from now on. ( )
  bramboomen | Oct 18, 2023 |
This is the second and final installment of a very ambitious work, which encompasses multiple story threads, time frames, galaxies and life forms. We have the Trojan War, overseen by Greek Gods located on Mars, moraveks dispatched from Jovian moons, Shakespearean characters in real life (Prospero and Caliban) and a far future Earth, inhabited by the remnants of the human race, but controlled by post-human constructs.

This book cannot be read “stand alone”, and if you have read and enjoyed the first book, I would definitely finish the job. This book is actually just a straight-line continuation of Ilium. In effect, they act as a single enormous book, which, given the fact that Simmons wrote it, could have been several hundred pages shorter without losing anything.

As I said, it is very ambitious, and at times perhaps excessively so. Some of the action is irretrievably silly and absurd, but not to the extent of making the work unreadable. I’m not sure I would recommend starting the first book, but once you are 800 pages in, it is probably advisable to continue. ( )
  santhony | Nov 7, 2022 |
REALLY liked this book, the sequel to Ilium. I liked how it had Proust's Remembrance of things past, and In search of lost time, Shakespeare, the Greek and Trojan war, Mars (my favorite planet after Earth), Machu Picchu, . . . Wow. Next is Hyperion. ( )
  burritapal | Oct 23, 2022 |
Rather weaker than its predecessor Ilium. ( )
  Audacity88 | May 7, 2022 |
Really struggled with this one, despite loving the first one in the series. Far too looooooooooooong. And a bit dull, with mostly unsympathetic characters. Nearly saved by a pretty good ending (...albeit one with numerous dangling threads - I assume there's going to be another sequel or make that 1 star).
  hierogrammate | Jan 31, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 40 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (6 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Dan Simmonsprimary authorall editionscalculated
Pariseau, KevinNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rostant, LarryCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ruddell, GaryCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Dedication
This novel is for Harold Bloom, who---in his refusal to collaborate in this Age of Resentment---has given me great pleasure.
First words
Helen of Troy awakes just before dawn to the sound of air raid sirens.
Quotations
Information from the Dutch Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Hoe had Homerus al die dingen kunnen weten?
Toen dit alles zich afspeelde was hij een kameel in Bactria!
LUCIANUS, De droom
...de werkelijke geschiedenis van de aarde is in laatste instantie een verhaal over medogenloze oorlogvoering.
Noch zijn medemensen, noch zijn goden, noch zijn hartstochten laten een mens met rust.
JOSEPH CONRAD, Notes on Lifes and Letters
Ach, schrijf niet langer over Troje
Waar de Dood zijn stempel achterliet -
En verwar niet koning Laios' woede
Met de vreugde die de vrijheid biedt:
Al spreekt een sfinx met nieuwe monden
Van de dood die Thebe nooit doorgrondde.

Een nieuw Athene zal verrijzen,
En schenkt het verre nageslacht
Zoals het zonlicht aan de hemel,
de bloeitijd van haar praal en pracht;
Of laat, als niets van schoonheid leeft,
Wat de aarde neemt, de hemel geeft.
PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY, Hellas
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Information from the Dutch Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
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Wikipedia in English (3)

Beneath the gaze of the gods, the mighty armies of Greece and Troy met in fierce and glorious combat, scrupulously following the text set forth in Homer's timeless narrative. But that was before twenty-first-century scholar Thomas Hockenberry stirred the bloody brew, causing an enraged Achilles to join forces with his archenemy Hector and turn his murderous wrath on Zeus and the entire pantheon of divine manipulators; before the swift and terrible mechanical creatures that catered for centuries to the pitiful idle remnants of Earth's human race began massing in the millions, to exterminate rather than serve. And now all bets are off.

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