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Star Wars Episode III: Revenge Of The Sith…
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Star Wars Episode III: Revenge Of The Sith

by Matthew Stover

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1,373278,679 (3.95)17
After years of fighting in a civil war, Anakin Skywalker begins his journey towards the Dark Side of the Force, putting his friendship with Obi Wan Kenobi and his marriage at risk.

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» See also 17 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 27 (next | show all)
Whoo this book is a WILD RIDE y'all. It has a very specific tone which took me back a little bit, but it works so well throughout and just like drives it home again and again. It was rough sometimes to read--not because it was bad but in fact because it was too good and Anakin's journey was so rough to follow emotionally. But I really cannot recommend it highly enough if you like Star Wars; it's really an incredible telling of a movie I know many people didn't like, and I think the insights in it really make so much more of it fall into place. ( )
  aijmiller | Oct 10, 2018 |
Simply the best. A tragedy worthy of shakespeare's talent and indeed written by an author who truly understands every dramatic facet of Star Wars. Whether or not you like the movie version, the novelization by Stover fixes the things that were weak and strengthens the things that were great. A grand and incredibly intimate books that deserves a hundred re-readings. ( )
  DanielRobledo | Jan 17, 2018 |
This is the heart wrenching story the movie tried to be but simply stumbled too many times to ever successfully accomplish.

I started this book and from the beginning felt just incredibly sad. I finished this book flat out sobbing.

Every time someone asked me what I was reading, I had to finish my sentence with: it's such a good book! Because, mostly, novelizations are pale shadows to their original movie counterparts. This one, however, this one takes a story about love and pain and anger and forms it into something tragic. It wipes away all the stumblings of the movie.

It treats Anakin Skywalker like the tragic fallen hero he always deserved to be; it treated Obi-Wan Kenobi like the benevolently shining light of the prequel series we always knew he was.

While it's the line from this book that is the most quoted, it really does so perfectly encapsulate everything that Star Wars is meant to be and everything this book succeeds at even when the movie struggled to make it to this point:
"Love can ignite the stars." ( )
  eaduncan | Sep 14, 2017 |
Revenge of the Sith is often considered to be the best of the prequel trilogy of Star Wars films, if only for the dramatic second half when Anakin Skywalker converts to the dark side of the force and carries out dreadful deeds at the behest of his new master, the Sith Lord, Darth Sidious, followed by the tragic ending involving him and Padme. However, I thought this book was the weakest of the three novelisations of the trilogy. The author seems less assured than those of the Phantom Menace and Attack of the Clones novelisations, the book was overwritten and the descriptions of lightsaber and spaceship dogfights seemed too lengthy and tedious here. It is 100 pages longer than its predecessors, but the really dramatic second half, one of the most gripping and tragic sequences in all the Star Wars films and books when Anakin goes bad, occupies only the last quarter of the book and feels a bit rushed. There is a lot of introspection about the Force, including one fight sequence when Obiwan feels the Force in everything around him, including the enemies he fights, which poses the question, how does he or any other Jedi knight ever suffer defeat or have to trouble about vanquishing the dark side, when they could just think them into defeat? So, overall, somewhat disappointing. ( )
  john257hopper | Jan 27, 2017 |
reading this and "Shatterpoint" by the same author were revelatory experiences. ( )
  bensdad00 | Jan 10, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 27 (next | show all)
Revenge of the Sith is a rare gem among movie novelizations: one which not only tells the story and expands on it, can not only be appreciated without seeing the movie, but is better than the movie. Even if you hated Episode III, you should read the novelization. It just might restore your faith in the Prequel Trilogy.
 
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The author respectfully dedicates this adaptation to George Lucas with gratitude for the dreams of generations to come, for twenty-eight years, and counting...thank you, sir.
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