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Le pterodactyle rose et autres dinosaures (1986)

by Robert T. Bakker

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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6231128,842 (4.15)11
For over a century, dinosaurs have been thought of as plodding, dim-witted giant lizards too awkward and ill equipped to survive wholescale environmental change. Bakker offers startling new evidence destined to forever alter the perception of the much-maligned monsters, depicting them as never before imagined: hot-blooded, amazingly agile, & surprisingly intelligent.… (more)
  1. 10
    The Princeton Field Guide to Dinosaurs by Gregory S. Paul (alaskayo)
    alaskayo: I love this Bakker book and see it as a fun classic in the field, but despite this: It's horribly, horribly dated, and most of Bakker's famous hypotheses are now seen as bogus (and in many cases stolen) grabs for attention by fellow paleontologists, among whom he's more than a bit shunned. This Greg Paul book is the best I can think of that covers ever-changing modern paleo theory when it comes to our favorite Mesozoic critters. Paul is also among the most impressive dinosaur artists around!… (more)
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Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
Interesting. Well written and engaging. The book was first published in 1986 so might be a bit outdated, but still provides some fascinating details about dinosaurs that weren't in the general dinosaur books. ( )
  ElentarriLT | Mar 24, 2020 |
When I was a kid back in the 1970s, dinosaurs were tail-dragging beasts that lumbered across a swampy landscape with spewing volcanoes in the distance. They were invariably gray or green, cold-blooded, and they were most certainly dead. In the late 80s that view changed, and shortly thereafter the movie Jurassic Park showed us some fearsome and fast-moving bird-like monsters that dined on lawyers. I like the newer version much better!

Apparently, this was the book that challenged the old view and presented dinosaurs in a much different light. Bakker presents a very compelling case (at least for a non-paleontologist like myself) that they were warm-blooded and very likely the ancestors of modern day birds. He does this by looking at bone structures and where muscles attached, wear and tear on teeth, and footprints (among many other things), and while I'm not a paleontologist, I still found it very understandable. The book is heavily illustrated (by the author) which helps, too. And although the book was written thirty years ago, and much of his argument seems to have already become accepted, I found it a very enjoyable book. ( )
  J.Green | Nov 22, 2016 |
Bakker was the first to propose dinosaurs were warm blooded. ( )
  ShelleyAlberta | Jun 4, 2016 |
Bakker makes compelling arguments concerning ideas such as dinosaurs being warm blooded and covered in feathers which were controversial in the 80's but have largely been accepted today. A good read. ( )
  dswaddell | Feb 20, 2015 |
This book opened my eyes to a new way of thinking about dinosaurs. Highly recommended even now that Bakker's theories have gained more traction and no longer seem as radical as when he wrote this book. ( )
  tnilsson | Jan 25, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Robert T. Bakkerprimary authorall editionscalculated
Brood, KristerFaktagranskaresecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Malmsjö, KarinTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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To a dear friend, Professor Bernhard Kummel of Harvard University. Bernie grabbed me by the lapels back in 1974 and said, "Kid, you can't go on being an enfant terrible forever. You gotta write a book." So Bernie, here's your book.
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I remember the very first time the thought struck me!
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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For over a century, dinosaurs have been thought of as plodding, dim-witted giant lizards too awkward and ill equipped to survive wholescale environmental change. Bakker offers startling new evidence destined to forever alter the perception of the much-maligned monsters, depicting them as never before imagined: hot-blooded, amazingly agile, & surprisingly intelligent.

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For over a century, dinosaurs have been thought of as plodding, dim-witted giant lizards too awkward and ill-equipped to survive the ravages of environmental change. Bakker offers startling new evidence destined to forever alter the perception of the much-maligned monsters, depicting them as never before imagined: hot-blooded, amazingly agile, and surprisingly intelligent. Illustrations.
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