HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

March: Book One (2013)

by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, Nate Powell (Illustrator)

Other authors: Nate Powell (Designer), Chris Ross (Designer)

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: March (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,9141604,716 (4.46)244
History. African American Nonfiction. Young Adult Nonfiction. HTML:

Congressman John Lewis (GA-5) is an American icon, one of the key figures of the civil rights movement. His commitment to justice and nonviolence has taken him from an Alabama sharecropper's farm to the halls of Congress, from a segregated schoolroom to the 1963 March on Washington, and from receiving beatings from state troopers to receiving the Medal of Freedom from the first African-American president.Now, to share his remarkable story with new generations, Lewis presents March, a graphic novel trilogy, in collaboration with co-writer Andrew Aydin and New York Times best-selling artist Nate Powell (winner of the Eisner Award and LA Times Book Prize finalist for Swallow Me Whole).March is a vivid first-hand account of John Lewis' lifelong struggle for civil and human rights, meditating in the modern age on the distance traveled since the days of Jim Crow and segregation. Rooted in Lewis' personal story, it also reflects on the highs and lows of the broader civil rights movement.Book One spans John Lewis' youth in rural Alabama, his life-changing meeting with Martin Luther King, Jr., the birth of the Nashville Student Movement, and their battle to tear down segregation through nonviolent lunch counter sit-ins, building to a stunning climax on the steps of City Hall.Many years ago, John Lewis and other student activists drew inspiration from the 1958 comic book Martin Luther King and the Montgomery Story. Now, his own comics bring those days to life for a new audience, testifying to a movement whose echoes will be heard for generations.

.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 244 mentions

English (158)  French (2)  All languages (160)
Showing 1-5 of 158 (next | show all)
I am ashamed at what I don’t really know/understand about the Civil Rights movement.

Starting here with John Lewis’ graphic novel trio ( )
  hmonkeyreads | Jan 25, 2024 |
What is most important about the March series is that it goes into specifics not just the important events leading up to the Civil Rights Act of 1964, but the strategy and internal conflict within the various organizations that made up the civil rights movement. Here we have the backstory of how John Lewis joined the movement, and the early victories in desegregating lunch counters in Nashville, where Lewis went to divinity school.

Training in principles of non-violence was essential to the success of the movement. This is a point that is increasingly important in today's civil rights activism - people need to be educated not just in the ideas behind the movement, but the strategy that can best effect structural change. ( )
  jonbrammer | Jul 1, 2023 |
I forgot to add this one from finishing back in July......the start of my realization of how much I have to learn about America, my country, in the 1950s and 1960s.... ( )
  msgabbythelibrarian | Jun 11, 2023 |
The first of a three volume series, March: Book One sets the stage for those who wish to learn more about John Lewis, one of the powerhouses of the Civil Rights Movement and long-time U.S. Representative. Flashing back and forth between the present-day and the start of his political leanings, this book does a great job of introducing readers to the Civil Rights movement in a way that is both informative and empowering. The authors are adept at showcasing the systemic racism present in the country and how hard it was (and continues to be) to fight the good fight. The drawings are incredibly well-done, with lots of zooming into facial expression to really capture the feelings of that moment. ( )
  annamora7 | Apr 13, 2023 |
For the Read Harder Challenge. ( )
  AnneMarie2463 | Mar 31, 2023 |
Showing 1-5 of 158 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Lewis, Johnprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Aydin, Andrewmain authorall editionsconfirmed
Powell, NateIllustratormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Powell, NateDesignersecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ross, ChrisDesignersecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Walton, LeighPublicitysecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

Belongs to Series

March (1)

Is contained in

Awards

Notable Lists

You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Epigraph
Dedication
To the past and future children of the movement.
First words
Can you swim? John?
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

History. African American Nonfiction. Young Adult Nonfiction. HTML:

Congressman John Lewis (GA-5) is an American icon, one of the key figures of the civil rights movement. His commitment to justice and nonviolence has taken him from an Alabama sharecropper's farm to the halls of Congress, from a segregated schoolroom to the 1963 March on Washington, and from receiving beatings from state troopers to receiving the Medal of Freedom from the first African-American president.Now, to share his remarkable story with new generations, Lewis presents March, a graphic novel trilogy, in collaboration with co-writer Andrew Aydin and New York Times best-selling artist Nate Powell (winner of the Eisner Award and LA Times Book Prize finalist for Swallow Me Whole).March is a vivid first-hand account of John Lewis' lifelong struggle for civil and human rights, meditating in the modern age on the distance traveled since the days of Jim Crow and segregation. Rooted in Lewis' personal story, it also reflects on the highs and lows of the broader civil rights movement.Book One spans John Lewis' youth in rural Alabama, his life-changing meeting with Martin Luther King, Jr., the birth of the Nashville Student Movement, and their battle to tear down segregation through nonviolent lunch counter sit-ins, building to a stunning climax on the steps of City Hall.Many years ago, John Lewis and other student activists drew inspiration from the 1958 comic book Martin Luther King and the Montgomery Story. Now, his own comics bring those days to life for a new audience, testifying to a movement whose echoes will be heard for generations.

.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Current Discussions

None

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (4.46)
0.5
1
1.5
2 4
2.5 3
3 48
3.5 12
4 209
4.5 45
5 355

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 201,641,561 books! | Top bar: Always visible