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March: Book One (2013)

by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin (Author), Nate Powell (Artist)

Other authors: Nate Powell (Designer), Chris Ross (Designer)

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: March (1)

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2,0601315,798 (4.45)231
This graphic novel trilogy is a first-hand account of Congressman John Lewis' lifelong struggle for civil and human rights, meditating in the modern age on the distance traveled since the days of Jim Crow and segregation. Rooted in Lewis' personal story, it also reflects on the highs and lows of the broader civil rights movement. Book one spans Lewis' youth in rural Alabama, his life-changing meeting with Martin Luther King, Jr., the birth of the Nashville Student Movement, and their battle to tear down segregation through nonviolent lunch counter sit-ins, building to a stunning climax on the steps of City Hall. Book two takes place after the Nashville sit-in campaign. His commitment to justice and nonviolence has taken him from an Alabama sharecropper's farm to the halls of Congress, from a segregated schoolroom to the 1963 March on Washington D.C., and from receiving beatings from state troopers, to receiving the Medal of Freedom awarded to him by Barack Obama, the first African-American president.… (more)
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» See also 231 mentions

English (129)  French (2)  All languages (131)
Showing 1-5 of 129 (next | show all)
This tells about the childhood of John Lewis, how he grew up and what started him on his path. It goes on to show how when he was older, groups practiced non-violence in sit-ins and marches. They didn't argue. They trained so they wouldn't have reactions. I never knew how much actually was behind the civil rights movements. This is a great read for kids and adults. Since it's a graphic novel and starts with him as a child, it's an idea why to share history with children. I recommend it. ( )
  ToniFGMAMTC | Feb 17, 2021 |
i'm so glad this series of books exists about john lewis' life. i am excited to learn about people other than martin luther king and malcolm x, as important as they were. i didn't know that john lewis came from such a religious background (i love how he preached to the chickens on his parents' farm), or that he had to basically go against his parents when focusing his fight on civil rights.

the black and white art is powerful, and poignant. i generally prefer to read more about something than a graphic depiction can give me, and while i know there is a lot more to this story, i got the whole picture here. i didn't feel like much context was missing, and the images are so powerful and resonant.

it's good for me to remember, as i get older, that it's so often the young ones who are able to fight the fight. who have the courage and strength, and also the new ideas. who aren't afraid to rattle the status quo or to take steps that seem big or risky in order to effect change and make things happen.

but what really strikes me about this book is the hope in how a small group of people really can change the world. the people who staged the sit-ins at lunch counters couldn't have numbered more than a few hundred at the most. and they were able to make a real, lasting difference. when i think about all that needs changing and how few people are willing to do the work, this book makes me think it's possible. because you don't need a huge groundswell. you just need a handful of dedicated people doing the right thing and showing the way.

i can't wait to read the other two books that follow this one. (i do wish the art, as good and powerful as it is, looked more - looked anything - like the people they represent.) ( )
  overlycriticalelisa | Feb 1, 2021 |
It took me way too long to figure out that "Bob" referred to John ROBERT Lewis. But it's a lovely reflection on his life growing up and joining the Civil Rights Movement. Told in flash back as he's about to head to Obama's inauguration which added a very nice touch. How far we've come...but how far we still have to go. (He spent some of his life helping get out the vote.) ( )
  Sarah220 | Jan 23, 2021 |
This was a vivid and moving account of some of Lewis's childhood and the lunch counter sit-in. It ended too soon, and I'm eager to read volume two. The book made me ashamed of my country (we're not so very much better on race than we were 50 years ago) and filled me with admiration for people like Lewis who took a stand that required real courage. ( )
  dllh | Jan 6, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 129 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
John Lewisprimary authorall editionscalculated
Aydin, AndrewAuthormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Powell, NateArtistmain authorall editionsconfirmed
Powell, NateDesignersecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ross, ChrisDesignersecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Walton, LeighPublicitysecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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March (1)
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To the past and future children of the movement.
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Can you swim? John?
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This graphic novel trilogy is a first-hand account of Congressman John Lewis' lifelong struggle for civil and human rights, meditating in the modern age on the distance traveled since the days of Jim Crow and segregation. Rooted in Lewis' personal story, it also reflects on the highs and lows of the broader civil rights movement. Book one spans Lewis' youth in rural Alabama, his life-changing meeting with Martin Luther King, Jr., the birth of the Nashville Student Movement, and their battle to tear down segregation through nonviolent lunch counter sit-ins, building to a stunning climax on the steps of City Hall. Book two takes place after the Nashville sit-in campaign. His commitment to justice and nonviolence has taken him from an Alabama sharecropper's farm to the halls of Congress, from a segregated schoolroom to the 1963 March on Washington D.C., and from receiving beatings from state troopers, to receiving the Medal of Freedom awarded to him by Barack Obama, the first African-American president.

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