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March: Book One by John Lewis
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March: Book One (2013)

by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin (Author), Nate Powell (Artist)

Other authors: Nate Powell (Designer), Chris Ross (Designer)

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: March (1)

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1,6221136,982 (4.44)217
This graphic novel trilogy is a first-hand account of Congressman John Lewis' lifelong struggle for civil and human rights, meditating in the modern age on the distance traveled since the days of Jim Crow and segregation. Rooted in Lewis' personal story, it also reflects on the highs and lows of the broader civil rights movement. Book one spans Lewis' youth in rural Alabama, his life-changing meeting with Martin Luther King, Jr., the birth of the Nashville Student Movement, and their battle to tear down segregation through nonviolent lunch counter sit-ins, building to a stunning climax on the steps of City Hall. Book two takes place after the Nashville sit-in campaign. His commitment to justice and nonviolence has taken him from an Alabama sharecropper's farm to the halls of Congress, from a segregated schoolroom to the 1963 March on Washington D.C., and from receiving beatings from state troopers, to receiving the Medal of Freedom awarded to him by Barack Obama, the first African-American president.… (more)

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» See also 217 mentions

English (112)  French (1)  All languages (113)
Showing 1-5 of 112 (next | show all)
Total cliche, but I read this over the MLK Day long weekend, prompted in part by the President-Elect foolishly and thin-skinnedly attacking John Lewis. But I had been meaning to read this for a while...

Anyway, it's an important story well told. For me it filled in some gaps in knowledge (from across the pond our curriculum about this era pretty much stops at MLK and Malcolm X), and made a lot of the background feel more real. There's something about the pettiness of the colour line that's been really getting to me lately--all these things that would have been so easy for whites to concede and make black peoples' lives materially so much harder--and this book captures that well. It also humanises some of the key figures who I'm use to hearing discussed in a rather hagiographic way; of course John Lewis himself the most of all, and I love the digression about him preaching to the chickens. ( )
  eldang | Sep 18, 2019 |
Total cliche, but I read this over the MLK Day long weekend, prompted in part by the President-Elect foolishly and thin-skinnedly attacking John Lewis. But I had been meaning to read this for a while...

Anyway, it's an important story well told. For me it filled in some gaps in knowledge (from across the pond our curriculum about this era pretty much stops at MLK and Malcolm X), and made a lot of the background feel more real. There's something about the pettiness of the colour line that's been really getting to me lately--all these things that would have been so easy for whites to concede and make black peoples' lives materially so much harder--and this book captures that well. It also humanises some of the key figures who I'm use to hearing discussed in a rather hagiographic way; of course John Lewis himself the most of all, and I love the digression about him preaching to the chickens. ( )
  eldang | Aug 11, 2019 |
I'm a big fan of graphic novels, but I've just begun to realize how powerful nonfiction graphic novels can be. Book 1 of [March] starts the conversation about how desegregation began. The idea of nonviolence to promote desegregation was an amazing plan promoted by Dr. Martin Luther King and several organizations in the 1950s. It began with sit-ins at lunch counters with both black and white individuals who actually took instruction in how to be effectively nonviolent. John Lewis, now a congressman from Georgia was just a young man when these began, but he made involvement in desegregation a big part of his life.

This graphic novel was in black and white (significant, maybe?) and was drawn in great detail, giving many facts about what actually happened. The only thing in this book that made me crazy were the mumbling people whose dialogues were too small and obscure for me to actually read. Maybe that was on purpose to signify what people said behind the backs of others, but for my aging eyes, I found it frustrating! This story is so important that I need to continue it in Book Two.

I follow congressman Lewis on social media to hear what he has to say about our current political situation. It is very helpful for me to learn so much more about his past and his very significant role in the Civil Rights movement in the US by reading this book. ( )
  SqueakyChu | Jul 9, 2019 |
Powerful. As Georgia Congressman John Lewis prepares for Barack Obama's inauguration on January 20, 2009, a black woman and her two sons find him in his office, and he tells them the beginning of his personal history, from raising chickens on his family farm, to his aspirations to go to school to be a minister, to his involvement in the nonviolent protest movement and sit-ins in Nashville, Tennessee.
Volume 1 of 3. ( )
  JennyArch | Jul 1, 2019 |
I saw this book on my library's e-books/download website and thought it was interesting so I borrowed it.

It is a graphic novel about the Civil Rights movement and what John Lewis dealt with as a child and college student....He is talking to a mom and her two kids about this part of history.

I really did enjoy reading it and having pictures to go along with it. I am not a big graphic novel or comic fan, but from time to time, I will find one that I will pick up and read (I think this is my 2nd or 3rd)...I will try to remember to look for the other books after this.

This is one book that I may try to find in a 'hard copy' in order to put it on my shelves.

If you or someone else you know like graphic novels, and want a little history thrown in....Then this is perfect.... ( )
  RamblingBookNerd | Jun 5, 2019 |
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» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
John Lewisprimary authorall editionscalculated
Aydin, AndrewAuthormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Powell, NateArtistmain authorall editionsconfirmed
Powell, NateDesignersecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ross, ChrisDesignersecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Walton, LeighPublicitysecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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To the past and future children of the movement.
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Can you swim? John?
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