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W Is for Wasted by Sue Grafton
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W Is for Wasted

by Sue Grafton

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: The Kinsey Millhone Alphabet Mysteries (23)

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» See also 60 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 63 (next | show all)
Always love Sue Grafton and Kinsey Millhone... perhaps me in another life? I think I could be a misfit PI who manages to get into just enough trouble without getting killed. I love the continuation of relationships across the books and look forward to seeing if the "new found dysfunctional family" shows up in future ones! And then there's Dietz... ( )
  asawyer | May 7, 2018 |
Kinsey follows the murder of a homeless man. Solid plot, with interesting side issues that come together at the end. Good read. ( )
  addunn3 | May 1, 2018 |
Another solid installment in the Kinsey Millhone series. I really enjoy the stories where we get to see parts of Kinsey’s past, where unknown family members come to light. What makes these stories such a treat to read (for me) is the detailed 1980’s California setting and Kinsey’s personal code of ethics, which leads Kinsey to involve herself in cases that other PI’s would probably turn a blind eye to. This story has a sadder atmosphere to it as the issues on tap in this installment are the plight of the homeless, the challenges (and perils) of navigating tricky family relationships and the ethics when running a human drug development clinical trial. Grafton continues to provide her signature escalation to a suspenseful (and for me, unpredictable) plot climax, while pulling two seemingly divergent storylines together into a cohesive unit. Yes, I was a little saddened that Kinsey’s love life continues to be on the skids but it was still great to see her three exes all back in this story, along with her wonderful landlord Henry Pitt and his hypochondriac brother William. ( )
  lkernagh | Aug 20, 2017 |
(11) Nearing the end I guess of the alphabet series and the adventures of Kinsey Millhone. I think I am reading these now just for completeness sake, not for any pressing desire for the stories. In this one, Kinsey discovers more long-lost family members through connections with two dead men. A private eye she used to work with, and a drunk homeless man that names her executer of his will. The overall theme is a crooked scientific experiment involving a bad pharmaceutical. It is a long, drawn out story.

This was something like 600pgs. Much to long for a Kinsey Millhone book. It rehashed the same territory many times and was really not ever an interesting 'whodunnit.' As always, Kinsey is easy reading and engaging enough that you follow the story and want to know its conclusion. But overall, forgettable. The best part was a new pet cat named, Ed.

I will finish the series. My feeling is that it might end with a whimper - after all there are only 3 books left and Kinsey is much the same person she started out as. A mediocre installment. ( )
  jhowell | Mar 4, 2017 |
I've been a fan of this series since they began. I love Kinsey's witty observations, her penchant for fast food, and all her other quirks. I even like how the series is set in the 80's, which requires old-fashioned detective work. Her landlord, Henry, and Kinsey's other colorful friends, are delightful.

This book has two victims, a homeless man and a rather shifty private investigator. At first glance the deaths seem unrelated but as Kinsey investigates, it becomes clear the two are connected. A second plot revolves around Kinsey's newly found kin. I enjoyed the story, but at nearly 500 pages the book is overly (and unnecessarily) long. Some of the detail borders on the ridiculous (the salad spinner and the details of parking in a parking garage come to mind).

This isn't the best in the series and it isn't the worst. It seems Sue Grafton is tying up some loose ends and preparing for an end to the series. Understandable, but in the process Kinsey has lost her edge and is not quite as interesting a character. But still, I'll keep reading to the end and hope the next installment brings back the Kinsey we know and love. ( )
  janb37 | Feb 13, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 63 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (4 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Grafton, SueAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ordóñez, VictoriaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
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For Margo and Jeff Barbakow and
Terri and Steve Bass.

Friends forever...and that's what it's all about.
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Two dead men changed the course of my life that fall.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0399158987, Hardcover)

Of the #1 New York Times–bestselling Kinsey Millhone series, NPR said, “Makes me wish there were more than 26 letters.”

Two dead bodies changed the course of my life that fall. One of them I knew and the other I’d never laid eyes on until I saw him in the morgue.

The first was a local PI of suspect reputation. He’d been gunned down near the beach at Santa Teresa. It looked like a robbery gone bad. The other was on the beach six weeks later. He’d been sleeping rough. Probably homeless. No identification. A slip of paper with Millhone’s name and number was in his pants pocket. The coroner asked her to come to the morgue to see if she could ID him.

Two seemingly unrelated deaths, one a murder, the other apparently of natural causes.

But as Kinsey digs deeper into the mystery of the John Doe, some very strange linkages begin to emerge. And before long at least one aspect is solved as Kinsey literally finds the key to his identity. “And just like that,” she says, “the lid to Pandora’s box flew open. It would take me another day before I understood how many imps had been freed, but for the moment, I was inordinately pleased with myself.”

In this multilayered tale, the surfaces seem clear, but the underpinnings are full of betrayals, misunderstandings, and outright murderous fraud. And Kinsey, through no fault of her own, is thoroughly compromised.

W is for . . . wanderer . . . worthless . . . wronged . . .

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:05:11 -0400)

" Of the #1 New York Times-bestselling Kinsey Millhone series, NPR said, "Makes me wish there were more than 26 letters." Two dead bodies changed the course of my life that fall. One of them I knew and the other I'd never laid eyes on until I saw him in the morgue. The first was a local PI of suspect reputation. He'd been gunned down near the beach at Santa Teresa. It looked like a robbery gone bad. The other was on the beach six weeks later. He'd been sleeping rough. Probably homeless. No identification. A slip of paper with Millhone's name and number was in his pants pocket. The coroner asked her to come to the morgue to see if she could ID him. Two seemingly unrelated deaths, one a murder, the other apparently of natural causes. But as Kinsey digs deeper into the mystery of the John Doe, some very strange linkages begin to emerge. And before long at least one aspect is solved as Kinsey literally finds the key to his identity. "And just like that," she says, "the lid to Pandora's box flew open. It would take me another day before I understood how many imps had been freed, but for the moment, I was inordinately pleased with myself." In this multilayered tale, the surfaces seem clear, but the underpinnings are full of betrayals, misunderstandings, and outright murderous fraud. And Kinsey, through no fault of her own, is thoroughly compromised. W is for. wanderer. worthless. wronged. W is for wasted"-- "A novel in Sue Grafton's bestselling alphabet series featuring Kinsey Milhone" /… (more)

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