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Founding Mothers: The Women Who Raised Our…
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Founding Mothers: The Women Who Raised Our Nation

by Cokie Roberts

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1,525427,447 (3.51)53
  1. 00
    America's Women: 400 Years of Dolls, Drudges, Helpmates, and Heroines by Gail Collins (AnnaClaire)
    AnnaClaire: Though it covers much more material, I found America's Women to be much better written.
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» See also 53 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 42 (next | show all)
I've had my eye on this book for a while and since a good friend just loaned it to me I'm looking forward to reading it. (Thanks, Kathy!)
  tkcs | Feb 23, 2019 |
This book was just what was needed to pull me out of a reading slump. Founding Mothers: The Women Who Raised Our Nation by Cokie Roberts is an account of the women who supported and helped shape the development of the democratic government in the United States. While I initially thought that this would yield minimal new information considering how heavily this period of time was covered during my schooldays I discovered just how wrong (and ignorant) I was especially in regards to the women. I realized that it had never occurred to me to wonder just how long the absences of these women's husbands were during the creation of the Declaration of Independence, Constitution (including the Articles of the Confederation), and the U.S. government as a whole. Not to mention how absolutely strong-willed and informed these women were about the affairs of state (which was beneficial as they passed on the latest news to their husbands through extensive letter writing). Best couple award goes to George and Martha Washington who were the most well-adjusted and steadfast couple of the lot. Martha went everywhere George went including Valley Forge where she was instrumental in keeping the morale of the men up (and getting them to stay at all) as well as organizing other women into organized sewing groups to keep the troops clothed. Favorite woman of the many discussed was hands down Abigail Adams who not only had the keenest mind but also the sharpest tongue. She had no problem telling John where to go and letting him know that just because he was away didn't mean that the romance in their relationship needed to suffer. In fact, theirs was the most strained relationship of all as John was in high demand and for the majority of their marriage they were separated as he worked tirelessly in his work as a member of the Continental Congress and then later as the Vice President. If you, like me, love reading about confident women and relish learning new things about a slice of history you thought you had thoroughly mapped then I must point you in the direction of Founding Mothers. 10/10

PS Benjamin Franklin was the worst. ( )
  AliceaP | Nov 26, 2018 |
This was a nice read about the women of the founding generation. I had gone into this book expecting that it would be set up in a way that would provide the reader with a number of short biographies of the wives and mothers of the period. Instead, it was set up chronologically, which at first glance makes sense. However, it made for more difficult reading as the narrative seemed to be all over the place. We would have three paragraphs about one woman, and in the next paragraph, there would be a sudden switch to a new woman. For me personally, it made for choppy reading.

I offer that criticism with love however as I did enjoy many parts of the book. There were many nuggets sprinkled in throughout the story that had me smiling, and I did not have a problem with the random sidebars of the author who wrote as if she was a friend of these women. Recommended for the popular reader, but not for a more serious historical scholar. ( )
  msaucier818 | Apr 9, 2018 |
The book is about the different ladies from 1765-1815. It talks about how they all helped throughout revolutionary war and the starting of the American people. This would be helpful in teaching students about the war. It would also help with young girls showing them that they're were more than men that helped in the revolution.
  LeanneWorth | Nov 14, 2017 |
his is a collection of short (one-two paragraph) biographies of important women from the Revolutionary War. Robert’s include the obvious (Martha Washington, Abigail Adams) but I was pleased that she also included Mercy Otis Warren, Eliza Lucas Pinckney, and other less well-known women. The volume contains lively illustrations by Diane Goode and excellent resources for further learning.
I would be careful of considering this historically accurate. Roberts tells the most popular version of the life and stories of these women. These stories often overlook some of the more unpleasant truths about our founding mothers. This book is a good starting point but should not be the sole or absolute source for information on these extraordinary women. Worth owning for any child, but particularly excellent for young girls. ( )
  empress8411 | Dec 27, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 42 (next | show all)
''Founding Mothers'' is essentially a series of entertaining mini-biographies and engaging vignettes.
 
In addition to telling wonderful stories, Roberts also presents a very readable, serviceable account of politics—male and female—in early America. If only our standard history textbooks were written with such flair!
 
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To my own Founding Mothers: The women in my family, particularly my mother, who told the stories that we call history. And, especially, to the religious of the Society of the Sacred Heart, the RSCJ's, who took girls seriously—a radical notion in the 1950s.
First words
Chapter One
Before 1775:
The Road to Revolution

Deborah Read Franklin

Stirrings of Discontent

When you hear of a family with two brothers who fought heroically in the Revolutionary War, served their state in high office, and emerged as key figures in the new American nation, don't you immediately think, "They must have had a remarkable mother"?
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Companion volume to Ladies of Liberty.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 006009026X, Paperback)

From #1 New York Times bestselling author Cokie Roberts comes New York Times bestseller Founding Mothers, an intimate and illuminating look at the fervently patriotic and passionate women whose tireless pursuits on behalf of their families–and their country–proved just as crucial to the forging of a new nation as the rebellion that established it.

While much has been written about the men who signed the Declaration of Independence, battled the British, and framed the Constitution, the wives, mothers, sisters and daughters they left behind have been little noticed by history. #1 New York Times bestselling author Cokie Roberts brings us women who fought the Revolution as valiantly as the men, often defending their very doorsteps. Drawing upon personal correspondence, private journals, and even favoured recipes, Roberts reveals the often surprising stories of these fascinating women, bringing to life the everyday trials and extraordinary triumphs of individuals like Abigail Adams, Mercy Otis Warren, Deborah Read Franklin, Eliza Pinckney, Catherine Littlefield Green, Esther DeBerdt Reed and Martha Washington–proving that without our exemplary women, the new country might have never survived.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:19:06 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

Cokie Roberts's number one New York Times bestseller, We Are Our Mothers' Daughters, examined the nature of women's roles throughout history and led USA Today to praise her as a "custodian of time-honored values." Her second bestseller, From This Day Forward, written with her husband, Steve Roberts, described American marriages throughout history, including the romance of John and Abigail Adams. Now Roberts returns with Founding Mothers, an intimate and illuminating look at the fervently patriotic and passionate women whose tireless pursuits on behalf of their families -- and their country -- proved just as crucial to the forging of a new nation as the rebellion that established it. While much has been written about the men who signed the Declaration of Independence, battled the British, and framed the Constitution, the wives, mothers, sisters, and daughters they left behind have been little noticed by history. Roberts brings us the women who fought the Revolution as valiantly as the men, often defending their very doorsteps. While the men went off to war or to Congress, the women managed their businesses, raised their children, provided them with political advice, and made it possible for the men to do what they did. The behind-the-scenes influence of these women -- and their sometimes very public activities -- was intelligent and pervasive. Drawing upon personal correspondence, private journals, and even favored recipes, Roberts reveals the often surprising stories of these fascinating women, bringing to life the everyday trials and extraordinary triumphs of individuals like Abigail Adams, Mercy Otis Warren, Deborah Read Franklin, Eliza Pinckney, Catherine Littlefield Green, Esther DeBerdt Reed, and Martha Washington -- proving that without our exemplary women, the new country might never have survived. Social history at its best, Founding Mothers unveils the drive, determination, creative insight, and passion of the other patriots, the women who raised our nation. Roberts proves beyond a doubt that like every generation of American women that has followed, the founding mothers used the unique gifts of their gender -- courage, pluck, sadness, joy, energy, grace, sensitivity, and humor -- to do what women do best, put one foot in front of the other in remarkable circumstances and carry on.… (more)

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