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Taratoa and the Code of Conduct: A story…
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Taratoa and the Code of Conduct: A story from the Battle of Gate Pā (2014)

by Debbie McCauley

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This children's picture book tells a story from the Battle of Gate Pā at Pukehinahina (29 April 1864) which was a pivotal point in the history of Tauranga Moana. It was illustrated by the author's 15-year-old daughter. In the early 1860s people around the world were reviewing methods of warfare and how to improve the way wounded soldiers from all sides were treated. Prior to the Battle of Gate Pā at Pukehinahina (29 April 1864), Tauranga Māori were pondering the same ideals as notable reformers Henry Dunant and Florence Nightingale. Māori gathered to discuss leader Rāwiri Puhirake's ideas about the treatment of wounded in a battle they knew was inevitable. Hēnare Taratoa, a mission educated lay preacher and teacher, was one of those warriors, and it is he who wrote the Code of Conduct. After the battle British were stunned, not only by their defeat at Gate Pā, but by Māori compassion. Māori chose not to mutilate or kill wounded soldiers, but instead gave water. Seven weeks later the British won the Battle of Te Ranga during which most Tauranga leaders, including Puhirake and Taratoa, were killed. This defeat led to Māori surrender and confiscation of land in Tauranga Moana. This bilingual book tells the story of Taratoa's Code of Conduct and the compassionate actions that resulted. Fact boxes and a timeline are included and add historical detail to Taratoa's story which is commemorated in a chapel at Lichfield Cathedral in England, as well as on a marble frieze at Tauranga's Mission Cemetery. ( )
  DebbieMcCauley | Dec 17, 2013 |
"Each double page spread has the creative non-fiction story told in English and Maori. Each page also has several other fact boxes and a central illustration... Social Studies teachers could use the book when studying peace keepers, and the history of New Zealand. Kura Kaupapa schools will find it a handy te reo resource".
 
"Debbie McCauley with her 15-year-old daughter have together done a marvellous job presenting the people involved in the battle of 29 April in 1864. And also placing the events along side those happening in the world during the same period... The detailed images throughout the book link well with the information and provide a plenty of background material for young readers. Of particular value is the fact that the book is bilingual. It will be a valuable addition to the classroom and I am sure will be enjoyed by many students throughout the country".
 
"An inspiring bilingual book which tells the story of the code of conduct written in 1864 before the Battle of Gate pa and the compassionate actions which resulted from it, including the treatment of captured or unarmed enemies and women and children".
 
"During the Land Wars of the 1860s in New Zealand, Henare Taratoa wrote a Code of Conduct before the Battle of Gate Pa at Pukehinahina (29 April 1864). This beautifully written bilingual book records the extraordinary story of compassion by Maori on the battlefield towards the defeated British".
 
"This important historical event, together with Taratoa's code of conduct towards enemy soldiers, is deserving of a book. The core bilingual narrative describing Taratoa's humanitarian efforts - his code predates the Geneva Convention - is simple and straightforward".
 
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In 1864 Tauranga Māori and British were about to fight each other at Pukehinahina. This would become known as the Battle of Gate Pā.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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"In the early 1860s people around the world were reviewing methods of warfare and improvements to how wounded soldiers from all sides were treated. Tauranga M?aori were among those pondering the same ideals as notable reformers Henry Dunant and Florence Nightingale. H?enare Taratoa penned a Code of Conduct prior to the Battle of Gate P?a at Pukehinahina (29 April 1864). After the battle the British were stunned, not only by their defeat, but by M?aori compassion. This bilingual book tells the story of Taratoa's Code of Conduct and the compassionate actions that resulted"--Back cover.

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