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Bird Box by Josh Malerman
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Bird Box

by Josh Malerman

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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1,1911209,977 (3.87)100
Recently added byRKKing, Kathryn250, GlennD1990, private library, sawcat, ocgreg34, rena75, MissSarahLou
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English (117)  German (1)  Italian (1)  All languages (119)
Showing 1-5 of 117 (next | show all)
I loved this book. So well-written, riveting, and completely terrifying. I still have questions and would love a sequel. ( )
  sprainedbrain | Dec 1, 2018 |
You can't look outside, you have to keep the blindfolds over your eyes. If you don't you will go mad and die. This is the life Malorie knows now, follow these rules and she and her children will be safe.

I sometime struggle with books set in times after a disaster of some sort whether it's the bomb, plague, or the unkown. This book intrigued me after seeing the trailer for the film version. I have to say that I quite enjoyed it.

The story follows Malorie before the problem, during the early part and four years later. I found the story very easy to read and fled through it. For me there was plenty of tension building and a lot of a claustrophobic feeling due to the circumstances.

My only niggle is that I didn't get to really understand what the thing was that created the 'problem' and as a reader didn't get to know what the creatures were. However for me it was the characters that mattered and how they bonded and coped with the new world they were facing.

I wouldn't say that this story was a horror and it wasn't scary but it was more about the unknown and what was going to happen next and to who. I quite enjoyed this book for what it was and maybe it's a good starting point for somebody to delve into dystopian fiction. ( )
  tina1969 | Nov 30, 2018 |
Quick reading horror story. Apocalyptic, psychological, yet written in a simple style. Emotive, but of course not literature. ( )
  keithostertag | Nov 28, 2018 |
I'm...conflicted. I really like the concept and I think the author does a good job of building tension, with regards to the unseen and the unknown. I love that we don't ever see the creatures, since a lesser book would have made it a shocking reveal and ruined the terror of your imagination. I think the last few sequences in the boat are very good like the close encounter with the creature, I loved that.

But I don't think the author excels at the interpersonal tension. The characterization fell flat for me, and since it's such a close quarters, intimate book, this is a glaring flaw. I feel like I know nothing about Malorie, beyond her desperate need for survival (which I suppose you could argue is the point, since she herself doesn't know who she is beyond that). But I also don't feel like I know any of the other survivors in the house well, except for maybe Tom. In a weird way, it was almost like Tom was the main character? Or the focal point, the center of the book? And even he wasn't really that compelling.

I don't know. I'm super super into the idea of a mother desperately clawing for the survival of her two small children, and I didn't get a story about motherhood. I'm also into the idea of a group fracturing hopelessly under the stress of a horrible situation (I just read Haunting of Hill House for goodness sake) and while I technically got that, I didn't really. I couldn't feel the tension in the way I would have if I knew more about and cared about the characters. It's boring that the one Aggressive Man is ultimately their downfall, since I was able to clock Don as the problem child almost as soon as he was introduced.

So ultimately what I got was an interesting idea that wasn't executed as well as I would have hoped. I think it does succeed at some things, but it certainly fell short of the masterpiece I've seen it described as. ( )
2 vote courtney.osteen | Nov 7, 2018 |
I'm...conflicted. I really like the concept and I think the author does a good job of building tension, with regards to the unseen and the unknown. I love that we don't ever see the creatures, since a lesser book would have made it a shocking reveal and ruined the terror of your imagination. I think the last few sequences in the boat are very good like the close encounter with the creature, I loved that.

But I don't think the author excels at the interpersonal tension. The characterization fell flat for me, and since it's such a close quarters, intimate book, this is a glaring flaw. I feel like I know nothing about Malorie, beyond her desperate need for survival (which I suppose you could argue is the point, since she herself doesn't know who she is beyond that). But I also don't feel like I know any of the other survivors in the house well, except for maybe Tom. In a weird way, it was almost like Tom was the main character? Or the focal point, the center of the book? And even he wasn't really that compelling.

I don't know. I'm super super into the idea of a mother desperately clawing for the survival of her two small children, and I didn't get a story about motherhood. I'm also into the idea of a group fracturing hopelessly under the stress of a horrible situation (I just read Haunting of Hill House for goodness sake) and while I technically got that, I didn't really. I couldn't feel the tension in the way I would have if I knew more about and cared about the characters. It's boring that the one Aggressive Man is ultimately their downfall, since I was able to clock Don as the problem child almost as soon as he was introduced.

So ultimately what I got was an interesting idea that wasn't executed as well as I would have hoped. I think it does succeed at some things, but it certainly fell short of the masterpiece I've seen it described as. ( )
  courtney.osteen | Nov 7, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 117 (next | show all)
Malerman overreaches a bit in his debut, which could use as much attention to the cast as to the mood, but the mood is chillingly effective.
added by zapzap | editA.V. Club, Tasha Robinson (May 14, 2014)
 

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Josh Malermanprimary authorall editionscalculated
Antón, MiguelTraductorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bortolussi, Stefanosecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Campbell, CassandraNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Chong, Suet YeeDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
De Vries, Eriksecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Guillot, SébastienÜbersetzersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
HarperAudioPublishersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kinzel, FredÜbersetzersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Limited, HarperCollins PublishersPublishersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mangold, KatharineNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Malorie stands in the kitchen, thinking.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0062259652, Hardcover)

Most people ignored the outrageous reports on the news. But they became too frequent, they became too real. And soon, they began happening down the street. Then the Internet died. The television and radio went silent. The phones stopped ringing. And we couldn't look outside anymore. Malorie raises the children the only way she can; indoors. The house is quiet. The doors are locked, the curtains are closed, mattresses are nailed over the windows. They are out there. She might let them in. The children sleep in the bedroom across the hall. Soon she will have to wake them. Soon she will have to blindfold them. Today they must leave the house. Today they will risk everything.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:25:08 -0400)

Something is out there, something terrifying that must not be seen. One glimpse of it, and a person is driven to deadly violence. No one knows what it is or where it came from. Five years after it began, a handful of scattered survivors remains, including Malorie and her two young children. Living in an abandoned house near the river, she has dreamed of fleeing to a place where they might be safe. Now that the boy and girl are four, it's time to go, but the journey ahead will be terrifying: twenty miles downriver in a rowboat -- blindfolded -- with nothing to rely on but her wits and the children's trained ears. One wrong choice and they will die. Something is following them all the while, but is it man, animal, or monster?… (more)

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