HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy (1980)

by David D. Burns

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,210295,477 (3.93)8
In Feeling Good, eminent psychiatrist, David D. Burns, M.D., outlines the remarkable, scientifically proven techniques that will immediately lift your spirits and help you develop a positive outlook on life. Now, in this updated edition, Dr. Burns adds an All-New Consumer's Guide To Anti-depressant Drugs as well as a new introduction to help answer your questions about the many options available for treating depression. Learn how to recognise what causes your mood swings, nip negative feelings in the bud, deal with guilt, handle hostility and criticism, overcome addiction to love and approval, build self-esteem, and feel good everyday.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 8 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 29 (next | show all)
I am embarrassed about loving a self-help book, but I do.

This book is brilliant. Practical advice and steps to help you control your own thoughts.
Even if you think you are in full control of your own mind it will probably be interesting to you as it gives you some idea of how cognitive therapy works and why it is so much more effective than everything that came before.

I don't think he's right about every feeling you have being brought about by your thoughts but, regardless of that, controlling them can only be useful. ( )
  RebeccaBooks | Sep 16, 2021 |
Sexist and dated. ( )
  digitalmaven | May 4, 2021 |
Stoicism writ practical. This belongs on the shelf next to Epictetus, Marcus Aurelius, Seneca. I'll be returning to this frequently. ( )
  exhypothesi | Mar 7, 2021 |
This book has changed sooo many things in my life that I'm not sure right now if I'm feeling good it's finished or not... ( )
  Reynik | Jan 27, 2021 |
The field of Cognitive Psychology is the underlying basis of this book on combating anxiety and depression. The first few chapters were very off-putting because the author tediously reiterated why buying his book was not a waste of money and then went on to give too much information about the development of cognitive psych. An additional oversight was the lack of explanation on whether anxiety is always an inextricable symptom of clinical depression. As a therapist, he could have explained simply and without all the self-justification that tainted the beginning chapters.

Once the reader has delved far enough into the book, around chapter 4, we get to the meat of the topic. These chapters were engaging and well-written. If one perseveres, genuine insights are available and the book becomes rewarding.

By comparison, other self-help books have more stringent editing with equally-effective techniques for self-help and education. It is always wise to read more than one author in a topic, as well. I recommend this book as worth your time, even if you skim a few of the irrelevant sections. For a comparison, check out The Body Keeps the Score (Bessel van der Kolk).

Note, the e-book copy of Burn's book (via Overdrive) was not formatted properly for either reading via a browser or an e-reader; if these display issues are an extreme irritant, I recommend borrowing the physical book. ( )
  SandyAMcPherson | Jan 24, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 29 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

Belongs to Publisher Series

You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
This book is dedicated to Aaron T. Beck, M.D., in admiration of his knowledge and courage and in appreciation of his patience, dedication and empathy.
First words
Depression has been called the world's number one public health problem.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy Revised and updated is the second edition of Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy, with only minor changes and a new introduction. It is not a separate work, so please do not separate the two editions of this work.

On the other hand, The Feeling Good Handbook IS a separate work from Feeling Good, as it is a companion book to this one.
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC
In Feeling Good, eminent psychiatrist, David D. Burns, M.D., outlines the remarkable, scientifically proven techniques that will immediately lift your spirits and help you develop a positive outlook on life. Now, in this updated edition, Dr. Burns adds an All-New Consumer's Guide To Anti-depressant Drugs as well as a new introduction to help answer your questions about the many options available for treating depression. Learn how to recognise what causes your mood swings, nip negative feelings in the bud, deal with guilt, handle hostility and criticism, overcome addiction to love and approval, build self-esteem, and feel good everyday.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.93)
0.5 1
1 5
1.5 2
2 15
2.5 2
3 45
3.5 6
4 64
4.5 6
5 85

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 164,590,795 books! | Top bar: Always visible