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Do As I Say (Not As I Do): Profiles in Liberal Hypocrisy (2005)

by Peter Schweizer

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2217124,816 (3.51)2
Prominent liberals support a whole litany of policies and principles: progressive taxes, affirmative action, greater regulation of corporations, raising the inheritance tax, strict environmental regulations, children's rights, consumer rights, and more. But do they actually live by these beliefs? Peter Schweizer decided to investigate the private lives of politicians like the Clintons, Nancy Pelosi, the Kennedys, and Ralph Nader; commentators Michael Moore, Al Franken, Noam Chomsky, and Cornel West; entertainers or philanthropists Barbra Streisand and George Soros. Using publicly-available real estate records, IRS returns, court depositions, and their own published statements, he sought to examine whether they lived by the principles they so forcefully advocate.What he found was a long list of contradictions. Many of these proponents of organized labor had developed various methods to sidestep paying union wages or avoid employing unions altogether. They were also adept at avoiding taxes; invested heavily in corporations they had denounced; took advantage of foreign tax credits to use non-American labor overseas; espoused environmental causes while opposing those that might affect their own property rights; hid their investments in trusts to avoid paying estate tax; denounced oil companies but quietly owned them.Schweizer's conclusion is simple: liberalism in the end forces its adherents to become hypocrites. They adopt one pose in public, but when it comes to what matters most in their own lives-their property, their privacy, and their children--they jettison their liberal principles and adopt conservative ones. If these ideas don't work for the very individuals who promote them, Schweizer asks, how can they work for the country?… (more)
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Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
Do as I say, not as I do. What prominent people say and how they actually lead their lives. ( )
  MrDickie | Sep 2, 2021 |
Regardless of your politics, this is interesting. Opinion changing, can-you-believe-that interesting. ( )
  SMBrick | Feb 25, 2018 |
It’s tough sometimes for us conservatives. We try and try and try again to point out the rank hypocrisies of our liberal betters – did you see the size of that house Al Gore just bought – only to be poo-poo’ed by our listeners, and to see our attempts muffled by a liberal-compliant mainstream media.

The problem is, then we sometimes get angry, and our tone gets perhaps a bit strident, and then we’re open to yet more opprobrium for being hateful haters who hate.

These temptations/pitfalls must have haunted Peter Schweizer as he grazed the vast buffet of liberal hypocrites available to him to expose and castigate. But he keeps his head, chooses wisely (he skewers such liberal leading lights as Ralph Nader, Noam Chomsky, the Colossus of double-speak that is Michael Moore, Barbra Streisand, the Clintons, and more), and writes it all up in the calmest, most even tone imaginable. There’s not an intemperate word in this book – just page after page after chapter of clearly-recorded, utterly infuriating hypocrisies from people who make it their life’s mission to hector the rest of us.

Schweizer is to be commended for this work. It’s a pity it’s not better-known and, incidentally, that it’s so ill-served by its rather lurid cover.

Highly recommended. ( )
1 vote mrtall | Jan 10, 2012 |
This is one oof my favorite books. It deals with various liberal political and cultural leaders who talk the progressive talk, but live their lives conservatively. Many of these people devote their lives to bashing the capitalist system and yet, through it, they became millionaires--some, billionaires. ( )
  GeorgeBarr | Jul 24, 2010 |
This book is for those who say that they avoid church because "that's where all the hypocrites are." ( )
  snappytype | Sep 6, 2008 |
Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
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Prominent liberals support a whole litany of policies and principles: progressive taxes, affirmative action, greater regulation of corporations, raising the inheritance tax, strict environmental regulations, children's rights, consumer rights, and more. But do they actually live by these beliefs? Peter Schweizer decided to investigate the private lives of politicians like the Clintons, Nancy Pelosi, the Kennedys, and Ralph Nader; commentators Michael Moore, Al Franken, Noam Chomsky, and Cornel West; entertainers or philanthropists Barbra Streisand and George Soros. Using publicly-available real estate records, IRS returns, court depositions, and their own published statements, he sought to examine whether they lived by the principles they so forcefully advocate.What he found was a long list of contradictions. Many of these proponents of organized labor had developed various methods to sidestep paying union wages or avoid employing unions altogether. They were also adept at avoiding taxes; invested heavily in corporations they had denounced; took advantage of foreign tax credits to use non-American labor overseas; espoused environmental causes while opposing those that might affect their own property rights; hid their investments in trusts to avoid paying estate tax; denounced oil companies but quietly owned them.Schweizer's conclusion is simple: liberalism in the end forces its adherents to become hypocrites. They adopt one pose in public, but when it comes to what matters most in their own lives-their property, their privacy, and their children--they jettison their liberal principles and adopt conservative ones. If these ideas don't work for the very individuals who promote them, Schweizer asks, how can they work for the country?

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