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William Shakespeare's Tragedy of the Sith's Revenge

by Ian Doescher

Other authors: George Lucas (Inspiration), William Shakespeare (Inspiration)

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: William Shakespeare's Star Wars (Part the Third)

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2086108,256 (4.17)4
The curtain rises once again on that star-crossed galaxy far, faraway-this time, to chronicle a once-heroic knight's transformation into the darkest of villains. William Shakespeare's Tragedy of the Sith's Revengeis the climactic conclusion to the fall of the house of Skywalker, a collaboration between William Shakespeare and George Lucas that's filled with masterful meter, stirring soliloquies, inside jokes, and intricate Elizabethan illustrations. You'll fall in love with Star Wars-and Shakespeare-all over again. At the same time!… (more)
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» See also 4 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
What a wild ride all six of these plays were!

To be honest, there were a few (IMHO) poorly written "Lucas Lines" that Doescher saved by Shakespeareanizing them (in particular, a handful of the cringey ones from the final Mustafar scene; you know the ones I'm talking about).

Bravo! ( )
  djlinick | Jan 15, 2022 |
The tragedies that we have seen do reach
Beyond the pale of what we humans should
Endure, far worse than mine imagination...


Well thank the Midi-chlorians thats over with. I really reget reading these in chronological order. At least i can move on to the original books now.

On its own i might have only rated this a high 3 but grading on a curve its much better. Although for almost every big soliloquy added by the adaptor, giving much needed depth or clarity to the plot, there will inevitably follow something clunky from the film that the adaptor couldn't change.

I'm not even sure i've ever watched this one... i mean i've definitely seen parts of it but not sure if i've ever sat down and watched it start to end.
The opening with the chancellor already kidnapped by General Grievous, who's i've barely heard of. I know he's from the cartoon but i mean who the hell thought that was a good idea?

Anyway, the adaptor really tries but can't entirely pull the Darth Vader plot thread out of its tailspin. Still overall, the best of the worst. ( )
  wreade1872 | Nov 28, 2021 |
A strong end to Ian Doescher's Star Wars prequel trilogy rendered in the style of the plays of William Shakespeare. Unsurprisingly, the prequels have been less fruitful for Doescher than the originals were, but he has still crafted some great work out of some often-underwhelming source material. That is an impressive achievement, for some of the elements of the prequel films are truly god-awful. However, as I have said in previous reviews, Doescher's new trilogy has helped me see the prequels in a new light and, whilst they are still deeply flawed, they are not quite the turkeys that they have often been labelled as. Leaving aside the sheer enjoyment I gain from reading Doescher's stuff, it is this altered perception which has been the main benefit to me.

It would be redundant to go into a proper review of Tragedy of the Sith's Revenge, because all the pros and cons are the same as the previous books and I would merely be repeating what I have said in other reviews. I suppose all I can do here is try to reassure potential readers. I had severe misgivings when I heard Doescher would be turning his aim from the successful original Star Wars films to the maligned prequels. Happily, I can say that whilst they are not quite as inspired as the originals (due to the diminished quality of source material), Doescher has still crafted some very entertaining books here. Unlike their film counterparts, they do not tarnish what came before, and I am very keen to learn where the author will next turn his hand. He's nothing if not prolific – these three prequel mash-ups have all been released in the space of about five months – so I don't think we'll have to wait too long for news. If Doescher does choose to pen more Shakespeare/pop culture mash-ups, or even tries his hand at more original fiction, I'll be first in the queue. ( )
  MikeFutcher | Jun 3, 2016 |
In Tragedy of the Sith's Revenge, Ian Doescher concludes his Shakespeare Star Wars saga on a suitably theatrical note. Doescher uses the theatrical genre to tease out more of the tragedy than appeared on film. When Anakin's fall begins to drive Padme away, Doescher ceases the rhyming couplets with which they'd conversed since the last book. Mace Windu's dialogue contains more references to Samuel Jackson movies, including Black Snake Moan, and R2-D2 has a fun reworking of "Let it Go" from Frozen (possibly to reference Disney's new ownership of the franchise). Fans of both Star Wars and Shakespeare will find plenty in which to delight as Doescher has created a masterpiece that gives new insight into both of his inspirations. ( )
  DarthDeverell | Dec 24, 2015 |
The dark fate of Anakin Skywalker is realized in “William Shakespeare’s Tragedy of the Sith’s Revenge” by Ian Doescher. The final prequel film was witness to the end of love and the rise of empire with little hope at the end, of which Doescher brings out in fantastic Elizabethan language just as Shakespeare would of if he had written it.

The journey of Anakin into Darth Vader alongside the downfall of the Jedi and the Republic to a Sith-led Empire is the central arc of the entire book. Doescher’s use of Shakespeare’s play-within-a-play theme as Palpatine’s vehicle to steer Anakin to the dark side is well done and another impressive choice the author has made throughout this adaptation series. The use of the character Rumour throughout the prequels pays off in this book as this character of Fate is given a departing soliloquy during Anakin and Obi-Wan’s epic duel in Act V. The duel itself is handled masterfully with asides from both characters and direct dialogue between them. Though unable to intertwine the various scenes post-duel, Doescher is able to construct a suitable sequence in which they occur rapidly one upon another to great effect.

The “Tragedy of the Sith’s Revenge” lives up to is heartbreaking title, but just as the film it ends with a little glimmer of hope. Doescher hints that he might be adapting the upcoming sequel trilogy, if this is the last adaptation of the Star Wars films into Elizabethan theater then like he begun the series Doescher ends it on a high. ( )
  mattries37315 | Oct 23, 2015 |
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» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Doescher, IanAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Lucas, GeorgeInspirationsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Shakespeare, WilliamInspirationsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Delort, NicolasIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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The curtain rises once again on that star-crossed galaxy far, faraway-this time, to chronicle a once-heroic knight's transformation into the darkest of villains. William Shakespeare's Tragedy of the Sith's Revengeis the climactic conclusion to the fall of the house of Skywalker, a collaboration between William Shakespeare and George Lucas that's filled with masterful meter, stirring soliloquies, inside jokes, and intricate Elizabethan illustrations. You'll fall in love with Star Wars-and Shakespeare-all over again. At the same time!

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