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The Draining Lake by Arnaldur Indriðason
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» See also 84 mentions

English (47)  Dutch (3)  Spanish (3)  Norwegian (2)  German (2)  Swedish (1)  Danish (1)  French (1)  Catalan (1)  All languages (61)
Showing 1-5 of 47 (next | show all)
I don't think I could live in Iceland although I would like to visit. Arnaldur Indridason certainly won't be hired by the Icelandic Tourism Board because he paints a pretty bleak picture about life there. He mentioned several times in this book about the high rate of depression in Iceland. His detective, Erlendur, likes to read books about people that have gone missing in Iceland and their bodies never found. For such a small population it seems to me that the rate of disappearance is excessive if there are a number of books about this. As I said Indridason isn't likely to be hired to attract visitors or immigrants to Iceland.

In this book a skeleton is found on the bed of a lake that has drained away a considerable amount of its water. The skeleton had a large hole in its head and was attached to a radio transmitter of Russian make. Erlendur and his co-workers are trying to figure out who the dead man is and whether there is any connection to Soviet spying during the Cold War. It takes them months to come to a conclusion and when they do the reader wonders why it took so long because the killer told his story in pieces throughout the book. I kept wanting the detectives to move faster but instead they were publishing cookbooks and going on vacations and having barbecues. And Erlendur's romance with Valgerdur, which started in the last book, doesn't seem to have progressed much. Also his daughter has fallen back into addiction and Erlendur hasn't figured out what to do about that. All in all, it just seemed to me a slow plod to a forseeable ending. ( )
  gypsysmom | Dec 14, 2018 |
One of Iceland's well known lakes is losing water and shrinking. Scientists from the National Energy Authority come researching the phenomenon because what was a deep body of water has slowly dried up, revealing long held secrets; some more disturbing than others. One such secret is the skeleton of a man murdered thirty years earlier. Anchored down with a Russian listening device from thirty years earlier, Inspector Erlendur and his team are called to the case. The mystery of the dead man brings Erlendur, Elinborg, and Sigurdur Oli back to the college days of the Cold War and Communism. Dancing between past and present, Indridason presents his readers with a thrilling tale of espionage and the very definition of loyalty. Fans will be happy to see a little more of Erlendur's personal life as well. ( )
  SeriousGrace | Jul 18, 2018 |
Indridasson writes very well in a low-key style which I liked very much, and the characters are very well-drawn.

The translation is excellent. There is no overblown prose or breathless descriptions of implausibly violent events, but the atmosphere and sense of place, both in present-day Iceland and in 1950s East Germany is exceptionally well evoked and truly engrossing - I really enjoyed getting a feel for Iceland in particular. The plot is (thank heavens) both comprehensible and believable and there is mystery and plenty of genuine tension in spite of a total (and to me welcome) absence of sex scenes, explosions and car chases.

In short, this is an intelligent, thoughtful and humane book which is also a really gripping read. ( )
  Jawin | Dec 29, 2017 |
Too predictable by half. ( )
  Lindoula | Sep 25, 2017 |
Number 4 in his Erlendur series. A lake, draining as a result of a fissure opened by a volcanic eruption, gives up a skeleton chained to a Soviet listening device. Erlendur's specialty is missing persons and the team is tasked with identifying the skeleton. This leads the to a man missing since 1968 and a group of Icelandic students at Leipzig University in the 1950s. Erlendur goeas in search of a missing hubcap (from the man's car) and follows the trail to the resolution of the crime. Several relationships are interwoven and a lot of Icelandic depression. ( )
  lmnopqr | Jul 10, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 47 (next | show all)
Realistically told, emotionally charged, and brimming with compassion, The Draining Lake is likely to challenge the reader’s values system. For this reviewer, at least, Indridason’s latest English-translated novel is one of the highlights of 2007. Although it’s full of pathos, the book also makes clear just how strong the human spirit is, and reminds us that the flip-side of friendship is far from pleasant. It can sometimes be hard to distinguish comrade from foe -- a person can be both at the same time....I wait patiently for the next Arnaldur Indridason/Bernard Scudder collaboration to arrive in bookstores. This is crime fiction at its most insightful, poetic and poignant

 
Indridason's novels are an undiluted pleasure....this series places Indridason at the centre of the best of contemporary crime fiction. He is a master storyteller, and has a real gift for evoking the complex humanity at the heart of the most dour-seeming individuals.
 

» Add other authors (29 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Arnaldur Indriðasonprimary authorall editionscalculated
Éric BouryTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bernadez, EnriqueTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Guidall, GeorgeNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Løken, Silje BeiteTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lembek, KimTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rexford, JustinCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Scudder, BernardTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Werkman, WillemienTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Slaap maar, ik ben dol op je (uit een volksliedje)
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She stood motionless for a long time, staring at the bones as if it should not be possible for them to be there. Any more than for her.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0312428588, Paperback)

Inspector Erlendur returns in this international Bestseller

Following an earthquake, the water level of an Icelandic lake suddenly falls, revealing a skeleton. Inspector Erlendur's investigation takes him back to the Cold War era, when bright, left-wing students in Iceland were sent to study in the "heavenly state" of Communist East Germany. Teeming with spies and informants, though, their "heavenly state" becomes a nightmare of betrayal and murder. Brilliantly weaving international espionage and a chilling cold case investigation, The Draining Lake is Arnaldur Indridason at his best.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:10:52 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

Following an earthquake, the water level of an Icelandic lake suddenly falls, revealing a skeleton. Inspector Erlendur's investigation takes him back to the cold war era, when bright, left-wing students in Iceland were sent to study in the "heavenly state" of Communist East Germany. Teeming with spies and informants, though, their "heavenly state" becomes a nightmare of betrayal and murder. Brilliantly weaving international espionage and a chilling cold-case investigation, The Draining Lake is Arnaldur Indri?ason at his best.… (more)

» see all 6 descriptions

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