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The Night Bird by Brian Freeman
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The Night Bird

by Brian Freeman

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English (10)  Italian (1)  All languages (11)
Showing 1-5 of 10 (next | show all)
Plot line was solid and the suspense was great. The character descriptions fell flat for me and seemed a bit superficial and immature but thankfully did not distract too much from the plot. ( )
  JamieBH | Apr 3, 2018 |
I won this in a GoodReads giveaway. ( )
  tenamouse67 | Jan 6, 2018 |
The Night Bird

The Night Bird by Brian Freeman
The Night Bird (Frost Easton, #1)
by Brian Freeman (Goodreads Author)
66991814
Angela Gibson's review Oct 23, 2017 · edit
liked it
bookshelves: mystery, thriller, suspense

Brian Freeman writes a great series of books based in Minneapolis, the Jonathan Stride series. I always look forward to when a Stride novel has been published, and I can add it to my TBR list.

The setting of San Francisco is as much a character in The Night Bird as any of the human characters. Brian Freeman is good at setting the place of a novel, which I like with the Stride series as well. There were times in The Night Bird where I could feel the dampness of the fog or get frustrated with getting lost in Dogpatch.

I didn't enjoy all of the characters and found that I was getting quite angry at how stupid some of these supposedly intelligent people were acting. Francesca Stein is a psychiatrist who uses a controversial method of memory erasure to help clients cope with memories that apparently can't be managed by recognized treatments. She would need a lot of academic smarts in order to attain PhD levels of education but apparently has no common sense. I don't want to spoil the action of the book, so I don't want to divulge when Francesca Stein exhibits a lack of common sense. I trust that you'll easily recognize these situations when you read them as they should hit you like an anvil to the head. I'm not sure how I feel about Frost Easton as a cop. In reading this first book about Frost, I don't think he is long for this world of police investigations if he continues to follow murderous suspects into a fog shrouded park and doesn't want for back up. Frost could use some more common sense as well as Francesca.

Now what I really enjoyed about this book was that it was spooky and freaky. It gave me chills to read about the suspect wearing a thoroughly creepy mask. It was interesting to contemplate the psychological torture; I'm not sure what that says about me as a person. In any event, this was a creepy book, and it fit a Halloween mood. I definitely read it at the right time of the Halloween season. ( )
  MNTreehugger | Oct 24, 2017 |
This book hooked me from the first chapter, so if you're looking for a page turner, look no further. I liked the main character (Frost) and will eventually check out the next book in this series. I didn't connect with another central character, the psychiatrist (Frankie), which may be intentional--the book mentions repeatedly how cold and guarded she seems and doesn't do a lot to build empathy. At several points in the book Frankie fails to see/admit the potential moral implications of her memory work. That central issue--whether it is ok to modify memory--covers the same philosophical ground as Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, but from a different enough direction that it doesn't feel like a retread.

The book is short enough and fun enough (in that murder mystery way) that it's worth the read if you like a) thinking about memory as topic (I do) or b) breezing through a page turner (I do too).

(Thank you Amazon Publishing and Goodreads for the copy of this book.) ( )
  little-gidding | May 4, 2017 |
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Book description
Homicide detective Frost Easton doesn’t like coincidences. When a series of bizarre deaths rock San Francisco—as seemingly random women suffer violent psychotic breaks—Frost looks for a connection that leads him to psychiatrist Francesca Stein. Frankie’s controversial therapy helps people erase their most terrifying memories…and all the victims were her patients.

As Frost and Frankie carry out their own investigations, the case becomes increasingly personal—and dangerous. Long-submerged secrets surface as someone called the Night Bird taunts the pair with cryptic messages pertaining to the deaths. Soon Frankie is forced to confront strange gaps in her own memory, and Frost faces a killer who knows the detective’s worst fears.

As the body count rises and the Night Bird circles ever closer, a dedicated cop and a brilliant doctor race to solve the puzzle before a cunning killer claims another victim.
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Homicide detective Frost Easton doesnt like coincidences. When a series of bizarre deaths rock San Franciscoas seemingly random women suffer violent psychotic breaksFrost looks for a connection that leads him to psychiatrist Francesca Stein. Frankies controversial therapy helps people erase their most terrifying memoriesand all the victims were her patients. As Frost and Frankie carry out their own investigations, the case becomes increasingly personaland dangerous. Long-submerged secrets surface as someone called the Night Bird taunts the pair with cryptic messages pertaining to the deaths. Soon Frankie is forced to confront strange gaps in her own memory, and Frost faces a killer who knows the detectives worst fears. As the body count rises and the Night Bird circles ever closer, a dedicated cop and a brilliant doctor race to solve the puzzle before a cunning killer claims another victim.… (more)

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