HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Have you checked out SantaThing, LibraryThing's gift-giving tradition?
dismiss
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

As You Like It (1623)

by William Shakespeare

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
6,126651,180 (3.74)168
With its explorations of sexual ambivalence, As You Like It speaks directly to the twenty-first century. Juliet Dusinberre demonstrates that Rosalind's authority in the play grows from new ideas about women and reveals that Shakespeare's heroine reinvents herself for every age. But the play is also deeply rooted in Elizabethan culture and through it Shakespeare addresses some of the hotly debated issues of the period.… (more)

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 168 mentions

English (60)  German (2)  Swedish (1)  Finnish (1)  Catalan (1)  All languages (65)
Showing 1-5 of 60 (next | show all)
ROSALIND:
My way is to conjure you; and I'll begin
with the women. I charge you, O women, for the love
you bear to men, to like as much of this play as
please you: and I charge you, O men, for the love
you bear to women--as I perceive by your simpering,
none of you hates them--that between you and the
women the play may please. If I were a woman I
would kiss as many of you as had beards that pleased
me, complexions that liked me and breaths that I
defied not: and, I am sure, as many as have good
beards or good faces or sweet breaths will, for my
kind offer, when I make curtsy, bid me farewell.
( )
  staunchwoody | Oct 30, 2020 |
It was like watching a family romantic comedy drama. And im happy at the end everyone found someone to share their life with. Even touchstone. Lol ( )
  Ajmi | Oct 20, 2020 |
English
  RevDrEdMac | Aug 13, 2020 |
First Shakespeare play, can't actually judge it, can I?
Honestly, I wish we were reading something else in my English Literature class, like Hamlet or Macbeth.
This play was a bore. There were some pretty good lines, but nonetheless, a bore. I only liked the character of the melancholy Jaques.
And I was expecting a really strong female character judging by the reviews but I HATED Rosalind. She was the most hypocritical female character ever.
I wish I could say I loved the play, but I didn't. I just didn't like it, it wasn't what I thought it will be. ( )
  AzuraScarlet | Aug 1, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 60 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (120 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Shakespeare, Williamprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bisson, Isabel J.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Brissenden, AlanEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Burchell, S.C.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Church, EsmeEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cunliffe, John WilliamEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Damon, Lindsay ToddEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dolan, Frances E.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dubrow, HeatherEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Duncan-Jones, KatherineEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dusinberre, JulietEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Furness, Horace HowardEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gaston, Charles RobertEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hudson, Henry N.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kellerman, IvyTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kellogg, BrainerdEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lamar, Virginia A.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Neilson, William AllanEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Oliver, H JEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pitt, David G.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Radspieler, HansEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ridley, M. R.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rolfe, William JamesEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Smith, J. C.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Thurber, SamuelEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Verity, A. W.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wetherbee, LouiseEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wieland, Christoph MartinTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wright, Louis B.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

Is contained in

Has the adaptation

Was inspired by

Has as a study

Has as a student's study guide

You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Information from the Finnish Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
As I remember, Adam, it was upon this fashion bequeathed me by will but poor a thousand crowns, and, as thou sayest, charged my brother, on his blessing, to breed me well: and there begins my sadness.
Quotations
All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players.
They have their exits and their entrances;
And one man in his time plays many parts...
The little foolery that wise men have makes a great show.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
This work is for the complete As You Like It only. Do not combine this work with abridgements, adaptations or "simplifications" (such as "Shakespeare Made Easy"), Cliffs Notes or similar study guides, or anything else that does not contain the full text. Do not include any video recordings. Additionally, do not combine this with other plays.
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (3)

With its explorations of sexual ambivalence, As You Like It speaks directly to the twenty-first century. Juliet Dusinberre demonstrates that Rosalind's authority in the play grows from new ideas about women and reveals that Shakespeare's heroine reinvents herself for every age. But the play is also deeply rooted in Elizabethan culture and through it Shakespeare addresses some of the hotly debated issues of the period.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.74)
0.5
1 10
1.5 7
2 71
2.5 11
3 248
3.5 51
4 320
4.5 23
5 222

Penguin Australia

2 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0140714715, 0141012277

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 152,515,477 books! | Top bar: Always visible