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Corrie Ten Boom's Prison Letters (1975)

by Corrie Ten Boom

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635628,593 (3.54)10
In 1944, as an act of resistance and commitment to their Christian faith, Corrie ten Boom and her family hid Dutch Jews from the Nazi regime. As a result, Corrie and her family were captured and imprisoned at Scheveningen and the concentration camp, Vught. While imprisoned, she communicated with her loved ones through letters filled with stories of unimaginable trials, resilience, and her unfailing faith in the Lord. This collection of deeply-moving letters represents the only tie between Corrie, her loved ones, and the outside world. It serves as a testament to her love and devotion to Christ and provides inspiration to us all.… (more)
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Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
As always Corries faith shows through. What an inspiration she and her family were to keeping your faith and trust in God even in very difficult times. ( )
  Lisa_Huettl | Jul 23, 2020 |
This is a collection of letters saved by Corrie ten Boom's sister Nollie from when Corrie and her sister Betsie were in prison. It is amazing to me that in the midst of prison and concentration camps, both sisters drew nearer to God. I liked their father's gymnasium actions on the night before they were sent to prison and separated and liked that it gave them something to think on and hold onto in their early prison days.

It's a mystery as to why some members of the family were released quickly and others were not. Even at Vught, it seemed that Corrie or Betsie thought they'd be released soon--but they were not.

I remember reading a story elsewhere of Corrie meeting a guard at one of her speaking engagements and realizing she had to forgive him. I hadn't before seen her letter to the person she thought had turned her family in for hiding Jews.

I am going to pass this book on to a friend to read. ( )
  JenniferRobb | Feb 23, 2020 |
Prison Letters is exactly what the title suggests: letters between the Ten Boom family and family and friends directly after they were imprisoned. Alongside The Hiding Place, this is an okay read. I didn't find it as enjoyable or as in-depth as The Hiding Place or as In My Father's House, but it sheds some light on what they went through. The letter format might not be enjoyable to some readers. ( )
  Nova23 | Sep 3, 2018 |
In this slim volume we are given a glimpse of life within a Nazi prison, told through letters written by Corrie and her sister Betsie. Their crime? Hiding Jews from the Nazis and assisting their escape. This is a good companion to the excellent The Hiding Place, but can also be read as a standalone volume. ( )
  fuzzi | Feb 16, 2018 |
This is a compiling of deeply moving letters that were the only tie between Carrie, her loved ones and the outside world during her time of trial and triumph.
  SABC | May 19, 2011 |
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To my family on earth and in Heaven whose testimony lives on through these letters and through my life
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From time to time I wrote short sketches on scraps of paper.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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In 1944, as an act of resistance and commitment to their Christian faith, Corrie ten Boom and her family hid Dutch Jews from the Nazi regime. As a result, Corrie and her family were captured and imprisoned at Scheveningen and the concentration camp, Vught. While imprisoned, she communicated with her loved ones through letters filled with stories of unimaginable trials, resilience, and her unfailing faith in the Lord. This collection of deeply-moving letters represents the only tie between Corrie, her loved ones, and the outside world. It serves as a testament to her love and devotion to Christ and provides inspiration to us all.

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The deeply moving letters that were the only tie between Corrie, her loved ones and the outside world during her time of trial and triumph.
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