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The work I did : A memoir of the secretary to Goebbels

by Brunhilde Pomsel, Thore D. Hansen (Author)

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221808,902 (3.83)None
'I know no one ever believes us nowadays: everyone thinks we knew everything. We knew nothing. It was all a well-kept secret. We believed it. We swallowed it. It seemed entirely plausible.' Brunhilde Pomsel described herself as an 'apolitical girl' and a 'figure on the margins'. How are we to reconcile this description with her chosen profession? Employed as a typist during the Second World War, she worked closely with one of the worst criminals in world history: Nazi Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels. She was one of the oldest surviving eyewitnesses to the internal workings of the Nazi power apparatus until her death in 2017. Her life, mirroring all the major breaks and continuities of the twentieth century, illustrates how far-right politics, authoritarian regimes and dictatorships can rise, and how political apathy can erode democracy. Compelling and unnerving, The Work I Did gives us intimate insight into political complexity at society's highest levels at one of history's darkest moments.… (more)
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Despite the misleading hungarian title (she wasn’t Goebbels’ personal secretary) it’s a higly interesting book advised to everyone. While reading one can’t stop thinking about that can ignorance and (let’s say it plainly, she does the same about herself in the book) stupidity be adequate answer to the question “and why didn’t you do anything?” The reader wavering between condemning and forgiving. At the end of the book there is a maybe a bit long but interesting essay comparing the 1930s to today’s political happenings and about the youth’s political indifference. ( )
  TheCrow2 | Feb 17, 2020 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Pomsel, BrunhildeAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Hansen, Thore D.Authormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Ovenden, HollyDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Whiteside, ShaunTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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'I know no one ever believes us nowadays: everyone thinks we knew everything. We knew nothing. It was all a well-kept secret. We believed it. We swallowed it. It seemed entirely plausible.' Brunhilde Pomsel described herself as an 'apolitical girl' and a 'figure on the margins'. How are we to reconcile this description with her chosen profession? Employed as a typist during the Second World War, she worked closely with one of the worst criminals in world history: Nazi Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels. She was one of the oldest surviving eyewitnesses to the internal workings of the Nazi power apparatus until her death in 2017. Her life, mirroring all the major breaks and continuities of the twentieth century, illustrates how far-right politics, authoritarian regimes and dictatorships can rise, and how political apathy can erode democracy. Compelling and unnerving, The Work I Did gives us intimate insight into political complexity at society's highest levels at one of history's darkest moments.

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