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Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria: And Other…

by Beverly Daniel Tatum

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1,0321315,514 (4.09)3
With a discussion guide and a new Epilogue by the author, this is the fifth anniversary edition of the bestselling work on the development of racial identity. Shares real-life examples and current research that support the author's recommendations for "straight talk" about racial identity, identifying practices that contribute to self-segregation in childhood groups.… (more)
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Very approachable and practical theory about the stages and relationships people have to race and racism. Lots to learn from. ( )
  reg_lt | Feb 7, 2020 |
Unlike many books on social topics, this one has not lost relevancy in the two decades since it was first written. ( )
  MarthaJeanne | Mar 25, 2019 |
Thorough - almost like a textbook. A little dated but still unfortunately all too relevant for educators and parents and people of any culture who realize that White privilege" still exists." ( )
  Cheryl_in_CC_NV | Jun 6, 2016 |
Read for a class in the education department at Mount Holyoke College. See also "White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Backback" by Peggy McIntosh (1989).
  JennyArch | Jan 22, 2015 |
Well, a bit of a mixed bag. Assigned reading and certainly an evocative title. While certainly valid and well written, the author comes across too strong. She insists on a practical regime for anti racism, but the force of her convictions is somewhat of a turn off and a let down. Further the section devoted to persons of 'other colors,' c.f. Latino's, AmerIndians and Pacific Asians, is very interesting but weak on the ground with only a few case studies to support the work. The author is certainly convinced of her position, there can be no doubt about that, and she wants to convince the reader as well. It is perhaps precisely this foot in the door technique that I dislike personally. Still it is an easy to read, well crafter text technically. There is an uncomfortable and inexplicable undercurrent throughout the book, that has nothing to do with the question of "White guilt," as the author puts it. Maybe it is because the book remains rather on the surface and does not go deep enough into the interpersonal relations or the fact that it has a subtle accusatory flavour, and also seems "over the top" at times. I have as yet to realize the nature of that discomfort and no doubt it shall be come clearer at a later stage. Still if one is interested in the question of race and race relations it is a worthwhile read. ( )
  Phoenixangelfire | Apr 6, 2014 |
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This fifth anniversary edition of Beverly Daniel Tatum's Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? (2003) includes a discussion guide and new Epilogue not appearing in earlier editions. Please distinguish this edition from others having different content.
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With a discussion guide and a new Epilogue by the author, this is the fifth anniversary edition of the bestselling work on the development of racial identity. Shares real-life examples and current research that support the author's recommendations for "straight talk" about racial identity, identifying practices that contribute to self-segregation in childhood groups.

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