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21 Lessons for the 21st Century (2018)

by Yuval Noah Harari

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3,174854,261 (3.99)42
History. Sociology. Nonfiction. HTML:#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER In Sapiens, he explored our past. In Homo Deus, he looked to our future. Now, one of the most innovative thinkers on the planet turns to the present to make sense of todays most pressing issues.

Fascinating . . . a crucial global conversation about how to take on the problems of the twenty-first century.Bill Gates, The New York Times Book Review

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY FINANCIAL TIMES AND PAMELA PAUL, KQED

How do computers and robots change the meaning of being human? How do we deal with the epidemic of fake news? Are nations and religions still relevant? What should we teach our children?

Yuval Noah Hararis 21 Lessons for the 21st Century is a probing and visionary investigation into todays most urgent issues as we move into the uncharted territory of the future. As technology advances faster than our understanding of it, hacking becomes a tactic of war, and the world feels more polarized than ever, Harari addresses the challenge of navigating life in the face of constant and disorienting change and raises the important questions we need to ask ourselves in order to survive.

In twenty-one accessible chapters that are both provocative and profound, Harari builds on the ideas explored in his previous books, untangling political, technological, social, and existential issues and offering advice on how to prepare for a very different future from the world we now live in: How can we retain freedom of choice when Big Data is watching us? What will the future workforce look like, and how should we ready ourselves for it? How should we deal with the threat of terrorism? Why is liberal democracy in crisis?

Hararis unique ability to make sense of where we have come from and where we are going has captured the imaginations of millions of readers. Here he invites us to consider values, meaning, and personal engagement in a world full of noise and uncertainty. When we are deluged with irrelevant information, clarity is power. Presenting complex contemporary challenges clearly and accessibly, 21 Lessons for the 21st Century is essential reading.

If there were such a thing as a required instruction manual for politicians and thought leaders, Israeli historian Yuval Noah Hararis 21 Lessons for the 21st Century would deserve serious consideration. In this collection of provocative essays, Harari . . . tackles a daunting array of issues, endeavoring to answer a persistent question: What is happening in the world today, and what is the deep meaning of these events?BookPage (top pick)
.
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» See also 42 mentions

English (69)  Spanish (7)  French (5)  Portuguese (Brazil) (2)  Chinese, traditional (1)  Norwegian (1)  Dutch (1)  German (1)  Catalan (1)  Italian (1)  All languages (89)
Showing 1-5 of 69 (next | show all)
This is the second book by this author which I have read. I like how he puts problems we face on a global basis rather than an individual or national basis. In order to survive in the future, we need to have a plan that will work for future generations. He talks about many subjects which will affect our lives in the future. For me, his most profound thoughts arise out of his belief that our lives consist of myths and stories which encompass such things as nationhood, religion, and other categories with which each of us self-identifies. What surprised me the most was at the end of the book where the author finds meaning and solace in meditation.

One thing I especially love about Harari’s writing is that he writes about each subject clearly and objectively. Whether I agree or disagree with what he writes, I understand perfectly what says. I also delight in the ways he expresses himself (i.e. “What my people lack in numbers and real influence, they more than compensate for in chutzpah.”). This author’s truths are so factual they oftentimes make me laugh in their simplicity.

Books like this one are exceptional in forcing readers to think about how objectively they see the world in terms of such things as religion, politics, and truth. I am eager to continue reading the brilliant writing of this author. ( )
  SqueakyChu | May 26, 2024 |
The author is not as well versed in AI, biotechnology, nanotechnology and digital technology - so the start of the book involves some implausible proposed scenarios and misses other more likely ones.

However, overall the book is great with many valuable ideas that are useful for broader critical thinking. Yuval unravels many of the cognitive contradictions that we live by every day and proposes realistic suggestively existential alternatives. ( )
  yates9 | Feb 28, 2024 |
Pensamientos que a veces tenemos, escritos para una lectura ligera y práctica. Percibo que es un libro de frustraciones, luchas internas y miedos, y al final dice como el logro manejarlos. Creo que lo que le funciono a el, puede que funcione a otros, pero no necesariamente es la misma solución para todos, a otros seguramente les funciona apegarse a esos mismos “relatos”, que para el son el “problema”, y para otros es otra la solución, una mas sencilla, y es que simplemente no existe o no tienen esas frustración y miedos (el por que y como no los tienen, es otra historia, que podría ser un capitulo entero de un libro o un libro). ( )
  keplerhc | Jan 22, 2024 |
Spellbinding and thought provoking study of human beings and the world they live in. Commentary on the world today and what it might become in the future and how humans should prepare for what lies ahead. Coincidentally, there was some interesting overlap of ideas with a book I just finished, ”God’s of the Upper Air”. In both, the author emphasizes how we must educate ourselves regarding our own inclinations, weaknesses, and prejudices In order to have any control over our destinies. ( )
  jemisonreads | Jan 22, 2024 |
В своей новой книге автор бестселлеров для умных Homo Sapiens и Homo Deus рассуждает уже не о том, как мы дошли до жизни такой, и не о том, что нас ждет через 100–500 лет, а о самом ближайшем будущем, которое разворачивается прямо перед глазами, но не всегда регистрируется нашим сознанием или нашими СМИ. Дает Харари и реакцию на значительную обратную связь, которую он получает со всего мира на свои будоражащие мысли. Главы 11-я «Война. Нельзя недооценивать человеческую глупость» и 12-я «Скромность. Вы не пуп земли» надо давать читать подрастающему поколению, даже если вам там что-то не по душе. А вот самую большую главу, 20-ю, «Смысл. Жизнь — не вымысел», венец всего труда и, наверное, квинтэссенцию всего здравого, что выработала человеческая мысль к данной минуте, советую прочесть уже всем и каждому.
  Den85 | Jan 3, 2024 |
Showing 1-5 of 69 (next | show all)
It’s no criticism to say that Harari hasn’t produced a satisfying answer yet. Neither has anyone else. So I hope he turns more fully to this question in the future. In the meantime, he has teed up a crucial global conversation about how to take on the problems of the 21st century.
 
Wittgenstein schreef dat filosofie alles zou moeten laten zoals het is: de wereld beschrijven en ordenen, zonder die uit te willen leggen of conclusies te willen trekken en daarmee de werkelijkheid geweld aandoen. Historicus Harari lijkt zich in precies zo’n spagaat te bevinden. Hij wil de geschiedenis beschrijven zoals die was, huidige wetenschappelijke en technologische ontwikkelingen weergeven zoals die zijn. Maar in zijn drang om conclusies te trekken en lessen aan te dragen, wordt zijn verhaal een theoretisch construct dat raakvlakken mist met de werkelijkheid.
 
[T]his book sees Harari enter that class of gurus who are assumed to be experts on everything. The 22nd lesson of this book is obvious: no single member of the tribe Homo Sapiens can know everything. If this new age needs new stories, then we have to let more people tell them.
added by Jozefus | editThe Guardian, Helen Lewis (Aug 15, 2018)
 

» Add other authors (13 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Yuval Noah Harariprimary authorall editionscalculated
Holdorf, JürgenNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Piani, MarcoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pieters, IngeTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Riera Arbussà, ErnestTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ros, JoandomènecTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Russia is one of the most unequal countries in the world, with 87 percent of wealth concentrated in the hands of the richest 10 percent of people.
The U.S. armed forces need thirty people to operate every unmanned Predator or Reaper drone flying over Syria, while analyzing the resultant harvest of information occupies at least eighty people more. In 2015, the U.S. Air Force lacked sufficient trained humans to fill all these positions, and therefore faced an ironic crisis in manning its unmanned aircraft.
Today, the richest 1 percent own half the world's wealth. Even more alarmingly, the richest one hundred people together more than the poorest 4 billion.
Devices, such as Google Glass and games such as Pokémon Go are designed to erase the distinction between online and off-line, merging them into a single augmented reality.
Since the 1950s, superpowers avoided conflicts with one another because they all knew that war meant mutually assured destruction.
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History. Sociology. Nonfiction. HTML:#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER In Sapiens, he explored our past. In Homo Deus, he looked to our future. Now, one of the most innovative thinkers on the planet turns to the present to make sense of todays most pressing issues.

Fascinating . . . a crucial global conversation about how to take on the problems of the twenty-first century.Bill Gates, The New York Times Book Review

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY FINANCIAL TIMES AND PAMELA PAUL, KQED

How do computers and robots change the meaning of being human? How do we deal with the epidemic of fake news? Are nations and religions still relevant? What should we teach our children?

Yuval Noah Hararis 21 Lessons for the 21st Century is a probing and visionary investigation into todays most urgent issues as we move into the uncharted territory of the future. As technology advances faster than our understanding of it, hacking becomes a tactic of war, and the world feels more polarized than ever, Harari addresses the challenge of navigating life in the face of constant and disorienting change and raises the important questions we need to ask ourselves in order to survive.

In twenty-one accessible chapters that are both provocative and profound, Harari builds on the ideas explored in his previous books, untangling political, technological, social, and existential issues and offering advice on how to prepare for a very different future from the world we now live in: How can we retain freedom of choice when Big Data is watching us? What will the future workforce look like, and how should we ready ourselves for it? How should we deal with the threat of terrorism? Why is liberal democracy in crisis?

Hararis unique ability to make sense of where we have come from and where we are going has captured the imaginations of millions of readers. Here he invites us to consider values, meaning, and personal engagement in a world full of noise and uncertainty. When we are deluged with irrelevant information, clarity is power. Presenting complex contemporary challenges clearly and accessibly, 21 Lessons for the 21st Century is essential reading.

If there were such a thing as a required instruction manual for politicians and thought leaders, Israeli historian Yuval Noah Hararis 21 Lessons for the 21st Century would deserve serious consideration. In this collection of provocative essays, Harari . . . tackles a daunting array of issues, endeavoring to answer a persistent question: What is happening in the world today, and what is the deep meaning of these events?BookPage (top pick)
.

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