HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

The Saturday Night Ghost Club (2018)

by Craig Davidson

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2822574,144 (3.96)28
Growing up in 1980s Niagara Falls - a seedy but magical, slightly haunted place - Jake Baker spends most of his time with his uncle Calvin, a kind but eccentric enthusiast of occult artifacts and conspiracy theories. The summer Jake turns twelve, he befriends a pair of siblings new to town, and so Calvin decides to initiate them all into the 'Saturday Night Ghost Club.' But as the summer goes on, what begins as a seemingly light-hearted project may ultimately uncover more than any of its members had imagined.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 28 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 25 (next | show all)
I picked this book up for my Halloween ghost stories fix. The cover and title made it seem like a cute little story kids and their "Ghost Club", to get in the Halloween spirit. However, it turns out the story really isn't about the kids and their "Saturday Night Ghost Club", but about the tellers' quirky uncle, and his struggle with mental illness. I really did enjoy the story, and would certainly recommend it. It's certainly worth your time to pursue...but if you're looking for a story about the kids and their "Ghost Club", the title and description are a little misleading. ( )
  Carol420 | Oct 22, 2021 |
A quick read, a ghost story/urban legend/family drama/coming-of-age story. Feels as though it was really written by a man looking back at what he remembered of his childhood. Had a very nostalgic vibe, but not as if it was cashing in on the recent Stranger Things trend, which was nice. ( )
  misslevel | Sep 22, 2021 |
I've come to the conclusion that Craig Davidson/Nick Cutter and I were simply not meant to be.

I know everyone else is fawning all over this novel, but for me, there was very little magic.

Someone else said in their review of this that Davidson is a reader's writer. I have to respectfully disagree, as anyone who reads a lot can very plainly see all the strings Davidson is pulling. A seasoned reader will see all the support structure behind the pretty sets. I find Davidson's writing very obvious.

I won't give it all away here, but if you were to make a list of a stereotypical coming of age novel, what would you stick in that list?

- the main character is likely the kid who's a bit different, who doesn't fit in
- a kid who bullies him that he'll need to eventually stand up to
- a new girl in town who's simply too attractive and kind to him
- a quirky relative who's engaging and takes the main character under his wing
- a bit of a mystery
- a town that can be both fondly remembered, but also has the ability to harbour darkness

Yeah. That's this novel. A paint-by-numbers novel that has been done—and done much better—by others. Davidson takes fucking forever to get the story going, then telegraphs his revelations pages in advance, and tacks on a very clunky explanation toward the end of the novel, instead of letting it all come to the main character in a more organic fashion.

And then there's just some stuff in there that simply feels like filler. The Screaming Tunnel. The junkyard.

I love the sandbox Davidson/Cutter plays in, but everything he does is weak echoes of those that played in the sandbox before him, and did it all better.

If you want to read the better written—and much more magical—version of this novel, do yourself a favour and pick up Robert R. McCammon's wonderful Boy's Life. Read that, and you'll see how much this one pales in comparison.

And I'm done with him now. I'll never read another Davidson or Cutter book again. Life's too short. ( )
  TobinElliott | Sep 3, 2021 |
3.5.

It was a quick, easy read. I liked it. I wasn’t blown away by it but I liked it. ( )
  lost_in_here | Jun 23, 2021 |
The writing was wonderful, the characters were interesting and likable (I particularly appreciated that Billy and Dove's indigenous heritage didn't come into play as some sort of mystical deus ex machina), the whole "80s small town with a dark history" concepy was done much better than I was expecting, but the actual plot itself left something to be desired.
I think the buildup was so good that I was anticipating something bigger, something supernatural, something that bridged the gap between dimensions, something suitably ghostly and terrifying enough to finish the book off with a nice bang. The actual ending was not any of those things and it felt like a massive letdown.
Generally, most of the times it's revealed that the "supernatural" events in a story can actually be explained by someone being mentally ill, as opposed to any kind of actual otherworldly things that would take the story into paranormal/horror/fantasy/magical realism territory I feel like the author just wussed out of leaning full tilt into the aforementioned genres because they didn't think they could do it, but wanted to try.
This isn't always the case, obviously. There have been fantastic stories of that manner, and as a literary device it can work well. I also understand what Davidson meant to do with this book and the direction he meant to take it in, but I can't shake the feeling that it would have been so much better with some actual element of the paranormal. ( )
  mateoj | Jun 2, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 25 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
The Brain--is wider than the Sky--
For--put them side by side--
The one the other will contain
With ease--and You beside

The Brain is deeper than the sea--
For--hold them--Blue to Blue--
The one the other will absorb
As Sponges--Buckets--do--


The Brain is just the weight of God--
For--Heft them--Pound for Pound--
And they will differ--if they do--
As Syllable from Sound--

--Emily Dickinson, 632
Memory is another word for story, and nothing is more unreliable.

--Ann-Marie MacDonald, Fall on Your Knees
Dedication
To Nicholas, With all the love in my body.
First words
Most people believe the human brain is solid.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Growing up in 1980s Niagara Falls - a seedy but magical, slightly haunted place - Jake Baker spends most of his time with his uncle Calvin, a kind but eccentric enthusiast of occult artifacts and conspiracy theories. The summer Jake turns twelve, he befriends a pair of siblings new to town, and so Calvin decides to initiate them all into the 'Saturday Night Ghost Club.' But as the summer goes on, what begins as a seemingly light-hearted project may ultimately uncover more than any of its members had imagined.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.96)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5 1
3 16
3.5 8
4 32
4.5 4
5 18

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 164,588,265 books! | Top bar: Always visible