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Backstory: Inside the Business of News by…
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Backstory: Inside the Business of News

by Ken Auletta

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The Amazon reviewer gave mixed opinions of this book. It IS a compilation over a number of years from the author's New Yorker articles on journalism (which continue)and some reviewers believed the material too dated to be valuable. However, after almost a decade the issue of the effect of the Internet on print is not yet resolved. They are varied, good reads, and the last chapter, a take on the relationship of the press and the Bush administration are especially valuable. ( )
  carterchristian1 | May 6, 2010 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0143034634, Paperback)

It is said that journalism is a vital public service as well as a business, but more and more it is also said that big media consolidation; noisy, instant opinions on cable and the Internet; and political “bias” are making a mockery of such high-minded ideals. In Backstory, Ken Auletta explores why one of America’s most important industries is also among its most troubled. He travels from the proud New York Times, the last outpost of old-school family ownership, whose own personnel problems make headline news, into the depths of New York City’s brutal tabloid wars and out across the country to journalism’s new wave, chains like the Chicago Tribune’s, where “synergy” is ever more a mantra. He probes the moral ambiguity of “media personalities”—journalists who become celebrities themselves, padding their incomes by schmoozing with Imus and rounding the lucrative corporate lecture circuit. He reckons with the legacy of journalism’s past and the different prospects for its future, from fallen stars of new media such as Inside.com to the rising star of cable news, Roger Ailes’s Fox News. The product of more than ten years covering the news media for The New Yorker, Backstory is Journalism 101 by the course’s master teacher.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 17:59:46 -0400)

An insider's look at the world of journalism addresses the struggle between ideals and the business of news, the moral ambiguity of the "media personality" phenomenon, the impact of the Internet, and other key topics.

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