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Maybe You Should Talk to Someone: A Therapist, HER Therapist, and Our Lives Revealed (2019)

by Lori Gottlieb

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,053878,014 (4.2)48
Biography & Autobiography. Psychology. Nonfiction. HTML:INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER!
Now being developed as a television series with Eva Longoria and ABC!
"Rarely have I read a book that challenged me to see myself in an entirely new light, and was at the same time laugh-out-loud funny and utterly absorbing."â??Katie Couric

"This is a daring, delightful, and transformative book."â??Arianna Huffington, Founder, Huffington Post and Founder & CEO, Thrive Global

"Wise, warm, smart, and funny. You must read this book."â??Susan Cain, New York Times best-selling author of Quiet
From a New York Times best-selling author, psychotherapist, and national advice columnist, a hilarious, thought-provoking, and surprising new book that takes us behind the scenes of a therapist's worldâ??where her patients are looking for answers (and so is she).
One day, Lori Gottlieb is a therapist who helps patients in her Los Angeles practice. The next, a crisis causes her world to come crashing down. Enter Wendell, the quirky but seasoned therapist in whose of­fice she suddenly lands. With his balding head, cardigan, and khakis, he seems to have come straight from Therapist Central Casting. Yet he will turn out to be anything but.

As Gottlieb explores the inner chambers of her patients' lives â?? a self-absorbed Hollywood producer, a young newlywed diagnosed with a terminal illness, a senior citizen threatening to end her life on her birthday if nothing gets better, and a twenty-something who can't stop hooking up with the wrong guys â?? she finds that the questions they are struggling with are the very ones she is now bringing to Wendell.

With startling wisdom and humor, Gottlieb invites us into her world as both clinician and patient, examining the truths and fictions we tell ourselves and others as we teeter on the tightrope between love and desire, meaning and mortality, guilt and redemption, terror and courage, hope and change.

Maybe You Should Talk to Someone is rev­olutionary in its candor, offering a deeply per­sonal yet universal tour of our hearts and minds and providing the rarest of gifts: a boldly reveal­ing portrait of what it means to be human, and a disarmingly funny and illuminating account of our own mysterious lives and ou
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» See also 48 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 86 (next | show all)
Interesting way to understand how therapy works. ( )
  kashakona | May 7, 2024 |
Really enjoyed how the author gave both sides of the experience of being in therapy. Very clever method and gave it lots of interest. ( )
  kheders | Apr 1, 2024 |
I really enjoyed this read. But, I did wonder how the author could reveal so much about her patients, even with name changes. I wondered how much of their stories were real or disguised. Still, I found all the stories and each patient’s personal journey (including the author’s) interesting. Reminded me of the old HBO show In Treatment which the author references at one point in the book. ( )
  ellink | Jan 22, 2024 |
Just a few observations:

I was more interested in Lori's patients than Lori herself, though I did really like Wendell as a character.

I stayed up way too late finishing this.

I cried and cried when Julie died.

I couldn't get it out of my head that John was Mad Men creator Matthew Weiner.

I believe almost everyone could benefit from therapy and this book confirmed that. ( )
  LibrarianDest | Jan 3, 2024 |
I have mixed feelings about this book. The parts where Gottlieb described her own patients were interesting enough to keep me reading, but I really couldn't have cared less about Gottlieb's life or her sessions with her own therapist. (He seemed very annoying, in fact.)

There were a couple of interesting bits here and there about psychotherapy, but if that's why you're reading the book, you'll likely be disappointed.

Actually, my favorite couple of paragraphs in the entire book were about Gottlieb experiencing an undiagnosed illness, which I can relate to. ( )
  RachelRachelRachel | Nov 21, 2023 |
Showing 1-5 of 86 (next | show all)
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Epigraph
It is proposed that happiness be classified as a psychiatric disorder and be included in future editions of the major diagnostic manuals under the new name: major affective disorder, pleasant type. In a review of the relevant literature it is shown that happiness is statistically abnormal, consists of a discrete cluster of symptoms, is associated with a range of cognitive abnormalities, and probably reflects the abnormal functioning of the central nervous system. One possible objection to this proposal remains—that happiness is not negatively valued. However, this objection is dismissed as scientifically irrelevant.
—RICHARD BENTALL, 
JOURNAL OF MEDICAL ETHICS, 1992

The eminent Swiss psychiatrist Carl Jung said this:
“People will do anything, no matter how absurd,
to avoid facing their own souls.”
But he also said this:
“Who looks inside, awakes.”
Dedication
First words
CHART NOTE, JOHN:
Patient reports feeling “stressed out” and states that he is having difficulty sleeping and getting along with his wife.
Quotations
Though we travel the world over to find the beautiful, we must carry it with us, or we find it not. - Ralph Waldo Emerson
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Do not combine the workbook or tool kit
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Biography & Autobiography. Psychology. Nonfiction. HTML:INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER!
Now being developed as a television series with Eva Longoria and ABC!
"Rarely have I read a book that challenged me to see myself in an entirely new light, and was at the same time laugh-out-loud funny and utterly absorbing."â??Katie Couric

"This is a daring, delightful, and transformative book."â??Arianna Huffington, Founder, Huffington Post and Founder & CEO, Thrive Global

"Wise, warm, smart, and funny. You must read this book."â??Susan Cain, New York Times best-selling author of Quiet
From a New York Times best-selling author, psychotherapist, and national advice columnist, a hilarious, thought-provoking, and surprising new book that takes us behind the scenes of a therapist's worldâ??where her patients are looking for answers (and so is she).
One day, Lori Gottlieb is a therapist who helps patients in her Los Angeles practice. The next, a crisis causes her world to come crashing down. Enter Wendell, the quirky but seasoned therapist in whose of­fice she suddenly lands. With his balding head, cardigan, and khakis, he seems to have come straight from Therapist Central Casting. Yet he will turn out to be anything but.

As Gottlieb explores the inner chambers of her patients' lives â?? a self-absorbed Hollywood producer, a young newlywed diagnosed with a terminal illness, a senior citizen threatening to end her life on her birthday if nothing gets better, and a twenty-something who can't stop hooking up with the wrong guys â?? she finds that the questions they are struggling with are the very ones she is now bringing to Wendell.

With startling wisdom and humor, Gottlieb invites us into her world as both clinician and patient, examining the truths and fictions we tell ourselves and others as we teeter on the tightrope between love and desire, meaning and mortality, guilt and redemption, terror and courage, hope and change.

Maybe You Should Talk to Someone is rev­olutionary in its candor, offering a deeply per­sonal yet universal tour of our hearts and minds and providing the rarest of gifts: a boldly reveal­ing portrait of what it means to be human, and a disarmingly funny and illuminating account of our own mysterious lives and ou

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