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Invisible Women: Data Bias in a World Designed for Men

by Caroline Criado Perez

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1,3105111,603 (4.28)80
Data is fundamental to the modern world. From economic development, to healthcare, to education and public policy, we rely on numbers to allocate resources and make crucial decisions. But because so much data fails to take into account gender, because it treats men as the default and women as atypical, bias and discrimination are baked into our systems. And women pay tremendous costs for this bias in time, money, and often with their lives. Celebrated feminist advocate Caroline Criado Perez investigates the shocking root cause of gender inequality and research in Invisible Women, diving into women's lives at home, the workplace, the public square, the doctor's office, and more. Built on hundreds of studies in the US, the UK, and around the world, and written with energy, wit, and sparkling intelligence, this is a groundbreaking, unforgettable exposé that will change the way you look at the world.… (more)
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English (49)  Finnish (1)  Spanish (1)  All languages (51)
Showing 1-5 of 49 (next | show all)
"Representation of the world, like the world itself, is the work of men; they describe it from their own point of view, which they confuse with the absolute truth" - Simone de Beauvoir

This is such an important book and I wish more people would read it. I had no idea of the severity of the gender data gap and its impact in our lives and future.
As a woman, I tend to be more aware of the invisible an unaccounted work we are doing. However, and probably naively, I had no idea of how much being a woman was ignored in the construction of the world we live.





( )
  Sara_Machado | Apr 7, 2022 |
I listened to the audiobook, and there was a large amount of statistics, making it difficult to follow at times, but I sure didn't know about all of the discrimination that has been rampant. This book was very informative. ( )
  Wren73 | Mar 4, 2022 |
An unexpectedly fast read, but exactly as interesting and engaging as I wanted it to be. ( )
  Monj | Jan 7, 2022 |
The result of this deeply male-dominated culture is that the male experience, the male perspective, has come to be seen as universal, while the female experience—that of half the global population, after all—is seen as, well, niche.

A deeply interesting book, but one that enraged me. I’ll be on the lookout for the female data gap from now on for sure. ( )
  isabelx | Jan 4, 2022 |
A look at the state of information on how women's needs differ from those of men. The author outlines what she calls the gender data gap - the lack of comprehensive information on women and their lives, their bodies, and their economics. This data gap is the result of centuries - make that millennia - of treating male humans as the default, and basing all the research on male subjects. She lays out a good case for why this is a bad idea, not just for women, but for everyone. She also demonstrates that at least part of this appears to be less oblivious than intentional, and that the challenges women face continue even as many people believe we have closed the gap between opportunities for men and for women. Highly recommended, especially for those who wouldn't dream of reading a book like this. ( )
  Devil_llama | Dec 31, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 49 (next | show all)
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Epigraph
Representation of the world, like the world itself, is the work of men; they describe it from their own point of view, which they confuse with the absolute truth.

Simone de Beauvoir
Dedication
For the women who persist: keep on being blood difficult
First words
Preface

Most of recorded human history is one big data gap.
Introduction: The default male

Seeing men as the human default is fundamental to the structure of human society.
Chapter 1.
Can snow-clearing be sexist?


It all started with a joke.
Quotations
The truth is that around the world, women continue to be disadvantaged by a working culture that is based on the ideological belief that male needs are universal, (Ch3 - The Long Friday, p86 hardback edition)
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Data is fundamental to the modern world. From economic development, to healthcare, to education and public policy, we rely on numbers to allocate resources and make crucial decisions. But because so much data fails to take into account gender, because it treats men as the default and women as atypical, bias and discrimination are baked into our systems. And women pay tremendous costs for this bias in time, money, and often with their lives. Celebrated feminist advocate Caroline Criado Perez investigates the shocking root cause of gender inequality and research in Invisible Women, diving into women's lives at home, the workplace, the public square, the doctor's office, and more. Built on hundreds of studies in the US, the UK, and around the world, and written with energy, wit, and sparkling intelligence, this is a groundbreaking, unforgettable exposé that will change the way you look at the world.

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