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Hood Feminism: Notes from the Women That a Movement Forgot

by Mikki Kendall

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1,3272814,268 (4.24)11
Politics. Sociology. African American Nonfiction. Nonfiction. HTML:A NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER
??
The fights against hunger, homelessness, poverty, health disparities, poor schools, homophobia, transphobia, and domestic violence are feminist fights. Kendall offers a feminism rooted in the livelihood of everyday women.? ??Ibram X. Kendi, #1 New York Times-bestselling author of  How to Be an Antiracist, in The Atlantic
??One of the most important books of the current moment.???Time
 
??A rousing call to action... It should be required reading for everyone.???Gabrielle Union, author of We??re Going to Need More Wine


A potent and electrifying critique of today??s feminist movement announcing a fresh new voice in black feminism

Today's feminist movement has a glaring blind spot, and paradoxically, it is women. Mainstream feminists rarely talk about meeting basic needs as a feminist issue, argues Mikki Kendall, but food insecurity, access to quality education, safe neighborhoods, a living wage, and medical care are all feminist issues. All too often, however, the focus is not on basic survival for the many, but on increasing privilege for the few. That feminists refuse to prioritize these issues has only exacerbated the age-old problem of both internecine discord and women who rebuff at carrying the title. Moreover, prominent white feminists broadly suffer from their own myopia with regard to how things like race, class, sexual orientation, and ability intersect with gender. How can we stand in solidarity as a movement, Kendall asks, when there is the distinct likelihood that some women are oppressing others?
In her searing collection of essays, Mikki Kendall takes aim at the legitimacy of the modern feminist movement, arguing that it has chronically failed to address the needs of all but a few women. Drawing on her own experiences with hunger, violence, and hypersexualization, along with incisive commentary on reproductive rights, politics, pop culture, the stigma of mental health, and more, Hood Feminism delivers an irrefutable indictment of a movement in flux. An unforgettable debut, Kendall has written a ferocious clarion call to all would-be feminists to live out the true mandate of the
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Showing 1-5 of 26 (next | show all)
In the feminist tract, Ms. Kendall illuminates the plight of women marginalized by the white mainstream feminist movement—whether unconsciously overlooked or deliberately erased. The chapters focus on feminist issues often ignored or downplayed: gun violence, food insecurity, poverty, race, sexuality, minority parenting issues. In doing so, Ms. Kendall crafts a solid argument that the problems with mainstream feminism’s lack of intersectionality sometimes cause or exacerbate the issues already facing non-mainstream women. The book tends to overgeneralize in places, ramble a bit, and repeat itself at times, but the inclusion of Ms. Kendall’s personal experiences added needed color to what sometimes was dry statistical argument. Despite the flaws I perceived, this book brings good arguments to the table. ( )
  bschweiger | Feb 4, 2024 |
I LOVED this book when I was reading it. Shortly after finishing it I posted on Instagram "amazing! so necessary and authoritative and ferocious!" I then saw a criticism of this book that it was not written for Black women, or even for women well-versed in intersectional feminism, but for Well Meaning White Women, and I immediately began questioning everything about my experience of reading this book.

But picking it up again, reading the cover copy, the blurbs, flipping through and reading snippets of the essays, I think that this is exactly what the book sets out to be. It is a reminder of who mainstream feminism does and does not serve. A reminder that looking out for the most marginalized ALWAYS benefits us all. A reminder about intersections — particularly those dealing with skin color. If those aren't reminders you need, there might not be much new in this book for you. But some of us need those reminders periodically, and I found this effective on that front. ( )
  greeniezona | Jan 28, 2024 |
"Hood Feminism" by Mikki Kendall is a groundbreaking and thought-provoking book that deserves a solid 5/5 stars. Kendall's insightful exploration of intersectional feminism not only challenges traditional feminist narratives but also provides a fresh perspective that is crucial for everyone to consider.

Kendall's writing skillfully addresses the gaps in mainstream feminism, highlighting the importance of including issues such as race, class, and accessibility in the feminist movement. Her emphasis on the experiences and struggles faced by women of color, low-income women, and marginalized communities is both eye-opening and empowering.

This book is a must-read for everyone, as it encourages readers to broaden their understanding of feminism and become more inclusive in their advocacy for gender equality. It is particularly valuable for white women and men who may not have fully grasped the depth of intersectionality within feminism. Kendall's passionate and eloquent writing invites readers to engage in essential conversations about privilege and solidarity.

In "Hood Feminism," Mikki Kendall challenges us to be better allies and to recognize that feminism is not a one-size-fits-all movement. It's an empowering and enlightening read that will undoubtedly leave a lasting impact, making it a 5-star recommendation for anyone interested in social justice and gender equality. ( )
  HauntedTaco13 | Dec 29, 2023 |
Hood Feminism is an engaging collection of essays that examines intersectional feminism. (aka the connection/overlap of feminism to hunger, the housing crisis, Black women’s maternal health, education, and more). When we think of feminism, what usually comes to mind is equal pay, abortion, and women’s suffrage. Hood Feminism shows us that the traditional embodiment of feminism focuses on the struggles of White women but leaves out those from marginalized communities, particularly Black women. ( )
  enlasnubess | Oct 2, 2023 |
definitely mixed feelings on this. i agree with much of what she states (although i do think she does not go deep enough at times) but its presented in a very scattered way. i do think this book is alright as an introduction to intersectional feminism but if youre well versed in intersectional, radical feminism nothing in here will read as revolutionary. i also wish she wouldve delved more into the issues of lesbian women of color and trans women of color. she touched on trans women slightly but it just did not go deep enough. ( )
1 vote femmedyke | Sep 27, 2023 |
Showing 1-5 of 26 (next | show all)
19 BLACK FEMINIST BOOKS YOU NEED IN YOUR LIBRARY
 
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Politics. Sociology. African American Nonfiction. Nonfiction. HTML:A NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER
??
The fights against hunger, homelessness, poverty, health disparities, poor schools, homophobia, transphobia, and domestic violence are feminist fights. Kendall offers a feminism rooted in the livelihood of everyday women.? ??Ibram X. Kendi, #1 New York Times-bestselling author of  How to Be an Antiracist, in The Atlantic
??One of the most important books of the current moment.???Time
 
??A rousing call to action... It should be required reading for everyone.???Gabrielle Union, author of We??re Going to Need More Wine


A potent and electrifying critique of today??s feminist movement announcing a fresh new voice in black feminism

Today's feminist movement has a glaring blind spot, and paradoxically, it is women. Mainstream feminists rarely talk about meeting basic needs as a feminist issue, argues Mikki Kendall, but food insecurity, access to quality education, safe neighborhoods, a living wage, and medical care are all feminist issues. All too often, however, the focus is not on basic survival for the many, but on increasing privilege for the few. That feminists refuse to prioritize these issues has only exacerbated the age-old problem of both internecine discord and women who rebuff at carrying the title. Moreover, prominent white feminists broadly suffer from their own myopia with regard to how things like race, class, sexual orientation, and ability intersect with gender. How can we stand in solidarity as a movement, Kendall asks, when there is the distinct likelihood that some women are oppressing others?
In her searing collection of essays, Mikki Kendall takes aim at the legitimacy of the modern feminist movement, arguing that it has chronically failed to address the needs of all but a few women. Drawing on her own experiences with hunger, violence, and hypersexualization, along with incisive commentary on reproductive rights, politics, pop culture, the stigma of mental health, and more, Hood Feminism delivers an irrefutable indictment of a movement in flux. An unforgettable debut, Kendall has written a ferocious clarion call to all would-be feminists to live out the true mandate of the

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