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The Red Limit: The Search for the Edge of the Universe

by Timothy Ferris

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2045102,906 (3.87)3
For centuries, it was assumed that our universe was static. In the late 1920s, astronomers defeated this assumption with a startling new discovery. From Earth, the light of distant galaxies appeared to be red, meaning that those galaxies were receding from us. This led to the revolutionary realization that the universe is expanding. The Red Limit is the tale of this discovery, its ramifications, and the passionately competitive astronomers who charted the past, present, and future of the cosmos.… (more)
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» See also 3 mentions

Showing 5 of 5
An enjoyable but extremely outdated overview of the history of cosmology. ( )
  jobinsonlis | May 11, 2021 |
For centuries, it was assumed that our universe was static. In the late 1920s, astronomers defeated this assumption with a startling new discovery. From Earth, the light of distant galaxies appeared to be red, meaning that those galaxies were receding from us. This led to the revolutionary realization that the universe is expanding. The Red Limit is the tale of this discovery, its ramifications, and the passionately competitive astronomers who charted the past, present, and future of the cosmos. ( )
  MarkBeronte | Jan 7, 2014 |
OK, outdated, but useful if read with a group of similar books. ( )
  carterchristian1 | Sep 8, 2011 |
Somewhat technical, but good read. Ferris is a good
writer of popular science. ( )
  zapato | Jan 28, 2007 |
Any cosmology book that has not been written *very* recently will be hopelessly outdated. This "second edition" is really a 1983, not a 2002, update of a 1977 book. It doesn't mention even such an essential idea as inflation theory (1980), let alone such a new and stunning discovery as accelerating expansion (1998). Ferris is a very good author, but I think this kind of republishing is inexcusable.
  fpagan | Dec 22, 2006 |
Showing 5 of 5
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For centuries, it was assumed that our universe was static. In the late 1920s, astronomers defeated this assumption with a startling new discovery. From Earth, the light of distant galaxies appeared to be red, meaning that those galaxies were receding from us. This led to the revolutionary realization that the universe is expanding. The Red Limit is the tale of this discovery, its ramifications, and the passionately competitive astronomers who charted the past, present, and future of the cosmos.

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