HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Parting the Waters: America in the King Years 1954–63 (1988)

by Taylor Branch

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: America in the King Years (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,822196,547 (4.54)69
Chronicles the civil rights struggle from the twilight of the Eisenhower years through the assassination of President Kennedy.
  1. 01
    Local People: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi by John Dittmer (eromsted)
    eromsted: The best study of the Civil Rights Movement in Mississippi.
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 69 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 19 (next | show all)
The Civil Rights movement did not come overnight. It was decades in the making. Parting the Waters is probably the best written history of the early days of the civil rights movement. Taylor Branch goes back before
MLK came to Montgomery to set the scene. It's publication has changed the nature and tone of the books that have come after it. Taylor Branch tells the story of a movement that was based on black communities banding together to seek change. The first of three volumes, it is book that, as
we move further away from that era, deserves careful reading. ( )
  Steve_Walker | Sep 13, 2020 |
Taylor Branch makes the life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. the primary focus of this first volume,
while he illuminates the faith and strength of the many brave, daring, and controversial men and women who supported,
inspired and sustained him. That Dr. King did not always do the same for them is an example of the author's extensive
research, sparing no one, Black or White, male or female, rich or poor, Baptist or Atheist, radical or conservative - from the Kennedys to King -
to examine
fault lines, evil, and greatness.

From Vernon Johns and Stanley Levison to Robert Moses, Bayard Rustin, and John Lewis, all are heroes!

Taylor Branch moves with understated eloquence and honesty as he relates how kids were risking their lives
in pursuit of FREEDOM while their rich religious elders and the liberal establishment in Washington created
a violent farce for white racists to gloat over. They could continue to murder, then sue the survivors for creating a disturbance.

Questions: Did MLK ever help those men he was imprisoned with? He gave them a promise.

Why did Eisenhower do so little to help?

and, most important, would Dr. King have sent his own children out to face the deadly hoses and the snarling dogs?
The "Children's March" that saved The South could so easily have turned into the Bull Connor/George Wallace Children's Massacre.

Would King and the other pacifist leaders have confronted the men who sent that little girl rolling down the street?

How did the rich northern Baptist churches justify themselves when so many African Americans in the South
faced lives of near-starvation, poverty, and no schools, doctors, or hospitals?

The author 'parts the waters' is so many ways, revealing the lame and dangerous excuses the Kennedys offered for their refusals
to send in the desperately needed federal forces to end and prevent the violence and murders of those merely seeking to register to vote.
Where was the promised "Voter Protection?!?"
And why did the Baptist leaders waste so much time and money on ridiculous confrontations
like the Taylor Preacher fracas? Again, Taylor Branch spares no fools.

What could be improved are the confusingly marked photographs, notably the first set. ( )
  m.belljackson | Feb 23, 2020 |
Well deserving for 100 New Classics designation. Told in a conversational style with rich details that provide a history lesson and an understanding of individuals that made history. It takes skill, courage, and perseverance to write a book of this magnitude. It was not always comfortable to read the events and the actions, but I appreciate the historical education from reading and thinking about these events and people. Kudos to the author for writing with such clarity and boldness. ( )
1 vote deldevries | Jan 30, 2019 |
Well, this certainly deserved the Pulitzer Prize. Over a thousand pages of names, events, drama, pain, blood, suffering, injustice, success and hope. Almost impossible to take in one long reading (but it was on loan, so I persevered) because of the hundreds of characters and dozens of threads (can one say 'plots'?). Taylor still manages to write with a light touch and good humour. And this is just Part 1 of the trilogy! ( )
1 vote PhilipJHunt | May 17, 2018 |
Taylor Branch has written a three-volume history of the civil rights movement. Being three volumes, the book is comprehensive enough to include the names of the hymns sung in church services. These details help readers really get involved in the dramatic events of the time.

Reading about Selma and other events, you actually share the fear of the participants and appreciate what heroes these people really were. ( )
  M_Clark | Feb 28, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 19 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Taylor Branchprimary authorall editionscalculated
Estell, DickNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kilkelly, Mary BethDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Morton, JoeNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pounder, C. C. H.Narratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Chronicles the civil rights struggle from the twilight of the Eisenhower years through the assassination of President Kennedy.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.54)
0.5
1
1.5
2 2
2.5 2
3 12
3.5 4
4 46
4.5 8
5 122

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 150,931,905 books! | Top bar: Always visible