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Grave Peril

by Jim Butcher

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: The Dresden Files (3)

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7,703230875 (3.98)297
Harry Dresden investigates a fellow magic user whose meddling in the spirit world results in ghosts wreaking havoc in Chicago.
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English (224)  German (1)  Catalan (1)  Dutch (1)  Piratical (1)  All languages (228)
Showing 1-5 of 224 (next | show all)
It's been awhile since I'd read the previous Harry Dresden book and I'd forgotten how much fun they are, although this one got pretty dark. I also liked that this one didn't end all cleaned up with a bow. Might have to not wait as long to read the next one! ( )
  KrakenTamer | Oct 23, 2021 |
While I enjoyed this installment in the series, it fell a little flat for me. There was a LOT of action and not much else. I felt that the MC went from one disaster to another without stopping for a breath of air. I want and need three things, a great plot, an MC to care about and some world building to pull it all together.

I hear the series improves with age so I will read on. I would rate this one 3.5 stars. ( )
  purpledog | Sep 16, 2021 |
First there was a sorcerer. Then werewolves. Next up, ghosts and vampires. The Dresden Files certainly get around.

I already said it last time, but it applies again: Grave Peril is a much better book (in my opinion) than Fool Moon, which in turn is much better than Storm Front. I'm sure this won't be the same pattern forever, but it's impressive enough to carry through three books.

Next thought: Michael. Dresden is what many boys / young men want to be. He's a powerful loner who's out to save the day (more or less). Slightly older and wiser though (for some definitions there of), I really admire Michael. He has a rock solid faith in God (granted, it's a different sort of faith when God is quite obviously a force in the world)--even when doubting himself. He will protect those that need protecting and he will do the right thing.

There are a few other very cool scenes in this book: A showdown in a cemetery (it was a dark and stormy night). A vampire-hosted masquerade. A trip through the Fae realm. Dresden's mind. Dresden really letting loose and blowing things up. I enjoy both the worldbuilding that underlies each of these scenes combined with the descriptions to make them come to life in my head.

Here, we also see the world expanding. There are at least three different kinds of vampires with all of the politics that entails. Dresden has dealings with a powerful Fae. There's a very cool scene with a dragon (with the oomph to casually smack Dresden across the room). This is part of what makes me keep reading these books. It's a huge world that somehow manages to avoid (for the most part) feeling 'kitchen sink'y' (although I'm still not sure how).

There's also more of the same when it comes to a surprising number of characters ending up naked or at least mostly so. Less than Fool Moon (I think), but still. Add to that the seductive powers of the White Court...

On the weirder end, this is the first introduction we get to Dresden's subconscious. I'm not really sure what to think about it. It feels like there's more to it than just a hallucination, but it's hard to tell for certain.

Overall, as I said, a great read.

Onward! ( )
  jpv0 | Jul 21, 2021 |
The ghosts of Chicago are getting riled up, forcing Harry to seek help from Michael Carpenter. Michael is a Knight of the Cross, religious to his core, who disapproves of Harry's use of magic but they have a common goal: the elimination of evil. Together, they rescue a maternity ward and a cop on Lieutenant Murphy's squad before the evil subdues Karen, kidnaps Michael's pregnant wife, and lures Harry's reporter girlfriend (Susan) into trouble. Harry is also being harassed by his fae godmother to honor his promise to serve her, while trying to stop the evil forces at work. Things come to a head at a vampire's elevation to the Red Council, when all hell breaks loose and Harry has to self-sacrifice to save the city and Susan. Dark fun. ( )
  skipstern | Jul 11, 2021 |
Grave Peril was awkward and odd.

When I started reading I thought I had missed a book in-between, but nope I didn’t. A year has gone by between book 2, [b:Fool Moon|91477|Fool Moon (The Dresden Files, #2)|Jim Butcher|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1345556849s/91477.jpg|855288], and book 3, [b:Grave Peril|91476|Grave Peril (The Dresden Files, #3)|Jim Butcher|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1266470209s/91476.jpg|803205]. During this year Harry, Murphy, Michael, and the SL team took down a Bad Guy Sorcerer who was using a Demon and other stuff to wreak havoc in Chicago. So, Harry has patched things up with Murphy and the SL team, Michael (who is Michael and where did he come from?) is more or less a friend now and helping him out, and Susan and Harry are together (OMG No).

The vague reference to the takedown is the source for the plot in this book. We are soon pulled into vampire trouble, ghost trouble, and the Nevernever.

Harry has become an immensely engaging character, between his feats as a wizard and his chivalry. I like him even though in this installment he got on my nerves a little. Their are a few different plot threads that keep you engaged. One of those threads has to do with Harry’s Faerie Godmother, who is desperate to own him… (Why?? You’ll have to read to find out. Oh My!! What will Harry do to get out of that predicament?) Then we have what’s going on with the ghosts, Harry’s love life, and the vampires.

The secondary characters really come out in this installment and a few new ones are added to the cast. Bob, was a great source of humor and I liked having him along for the ride.

Last, we can’t forget Susan, yes the report, who I dislike and think Harry could do better. Susan, is her typical self and when Harry says NO to her request she goes behind his back and ends up in deep deep trouble. What happens to her, is her fault, and her actions brought what happen to her onto herself. All I’ll say is I don’t feel sorry for her and what happened. I do feel sorry for Harry; because we all know he’s going to take what happened to her onto himself and feel like it’s his fault and he has to fix it.

Grave Peril was a good read. It not my favorite and I had a few issues, but I’ll still be continuing on to see what happens next to Harry.

Rated: 3 Stars



( )
  angelsgp | May 14, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 224 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (12 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Butcher, Jimprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Chong, VincentIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Marsters, JamesNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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There are reasons I hate to drive fast.
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I felt uncomfortable, approaching the church -- not for any weirdo quasi-mystical reason. Just because I'd never been comfortable with churches in general. The Church had killed a lot of wizards in its day, believing them in league with Satan. It felt strange to be just strolling up on business. Hi, God, it's me, Harry. Please don't turn me into a pillar of salt. (chapter 9)
Thaumaturgy is traditional magic, all about drawing symbolic links between items or people then investing energy to get the effect that you want. You can do a lot with thaumaturgy, provided you have enough time to plan things out, and more time to prepare a ritual, the symbolic objects, and the magical circle.
I've yet to meet a slobbering monster polite enough to wait for me to finish. (Harry, chapter 16)
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Harry Dresden investigates a fellow magic user whose meddling in the spirit world results in ghosts wreaking havoc in Chicago.

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