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Walking the trail : one man's journey along the Cherokee trail of tears (1991)

by Jerry Ellis

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1662129,399 (3.57)None
One fall morning Jerry Ellis donned a backpack and began a long, lonely walk: retracing the Cherokee Trail of Tears, the nine hundred miles his ancestors had walked in 1838. The trail was the agonizing path of exile the Cherokees had been forced to take when they were torn from their southeastern homeland and relocated to Indian Territory. Following in their footsteps, Ellis traveled through small southern towns, along winding roads, and amid quiet forests, encountering a memorable array of people who live along the trail today. Along the way he also came to glimpse the pain his ancestors endured and to learn about the true beauty of modern rural life and the worth of a man's character.… (more)
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A good book to read. Ellis shares just a bit of his own personal history but more of his immediate actions & responses to the people and nature he encounters on his walk from Tahlequah, OK to New Echota, GA. He is mostly encouraged by the helpfulness of strangers he meets along the way. His search for his connection with the Aniyun'Wiya (Cherokee) loses some of its power when the reader realizes he follows this book with one on his retracing the Pony Express Trail. He gives little pieces of events from the historical expulsion of the Cherokee from their homelands, so it helps if you've heard of the history before. There is a brief reference list cited at the end. ( )
  juniperSun | Oct 1, 2017 |
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For my mother and father and my ancestors in the other world.
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I'm soaked to the bone as I walk through a storm down a country road in western Arkansas.
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One fall morning Jerry Ellis donned a backpack and began a long, lonely walk: retracing the Cherokee Trail of Tears, the nine hundred miles his ancestors had walked in 1838. The trail was the agonizing path of exile the Cherokees had been forced to take when they were torn from their southeastern homeland and relocated to Indian Territory. Following in their footsteps, Ellis traveled through small southern towns, along winding roads, and amid quiet forests, encountering a memorable array of people who live along the trail today. Along the way he also came to glimpse the pain his ancestors endured and to learn about the true beauty of modern rural life and the worth of a man's character.

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